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591.
78. M.

RAFFLES.
The Saints in Glory.
1 HIGH, in yonder realms of light,

Dwell the raptured saints above,
Far beyond our feeble sight,

Happy in Immanuel's love.
2 Pilgrims in this vale of tears,

Once they knew, like us below,
Gloomy doubts, distressing fears,

Torturing pain, and heavy woe.
3 Happy spirits, ye are fled

Where no grief can entrance find,
Lulled to rest the aching head,

Soothed the anguish of the mind.
4 'Mid the chorus of the skies,

'Mid th' angelic lyres above, Hark! their songs melodious rise,

Songs of praise to Jesus' love.

592.

C. M.

STENNETT. Heaven in Prospect. 1 ON Jordan's stormy banks I stand,

And cast a wishful eye
To Canaan's fair and happy land,

Where my possessions lie.
2 0, the transporting, rapturous scene

That rises to my sight!
Sweet fields arrayed in living green,

And rivers of delight.
3 No chilling winds, nor poisonous breath,

Can reach that healthful shore;
Sickness and sorrow, pain and death,

Are felt and feared no more.
4 When shall I reach that happy place,

And be for ever blest?
When shall I see my Father's face,

And in his bosom rest?
5 Filled with delight, my raptured soul

Would here no longer stay ;
Though Jordan's waves should round me roll,
I'd fearless launch away.

593.

C. M. SIR J. E. SMITH.
The Changes of Nature Types of Immortality.
1 AS twilight's gradual veil is spread

Across the evening sky;
So man's bright hours decline in shade,

And mortal comforts die.
2 The bloom of spring, the summer rose,

In vain pale winter brave;
Nor youth, nor age, nor wisdom knows

A ransom from the grave.
3 But morning dawns and spring revives,

And genial hours return;
So man's immortal soul survives,

And scorns the mouldering urn.
4 When this vain scene no longer charms,

Or swiftly fades away,
He sinks into a Father's arms,

Nor dreads the coming day.

594.
C. M.

STEELE.
Glories of Heaven.
1 FAR from these narrow scenes of night,

Unbounded glories rise,
And realms of joy and pure delight,

Unknown to mortal eyes.
2 Fair, distant land !-- could mortal eyes

But half its charms explore,
How would our spirits long to rise,

And dwell on earth no more !
3 No cloud those blissful regions know,-

Realms ever bright and fair ;
For sin, the source of mortal woe,

Can never enter there.
4 O, may the heavenly prospect fire

'Our hearts with ardent love,
Till wings of faith, and strong desire,

Bear every thought above.
5 Prepare us, Lord, by grace divine,

For thy bright courts on high;
Then bid our spirits rise and join

The chorus of the sky.

595.
L. M.

STEELE. The Worship of Heaven. 1 0, FOR a sweet, inspiring ray,

To animate our feeble strains,
From the bright realms of endless day,

The blissful realms where Jesus reigns. 2 There, low before his glorious throne,

Adoring saints and angels fall;
And, with delightful worship, own

His smile their bliss, their heaven, their all. 3 Immortal glories crown his head,

While tuneful hallelujahs rise,
And love, and joy, and triumph spread

Through all th' assemblies of the skies. 4 He smiles, - and seraphs tune their songs

To boundless rapture, while they gaze;
Ten thousand thousand joyful tongues

Resound his everlasting praise.
5 There all the followers of the Lamb

Shall join at last the heavenly choir ;
O, may the joy-inspiring theme

Awake our faith and warm desire.

596.

S. M. MONTGOMERY.
The Issues of Life and Death.
1 0, WHERE shall rest be found,

Rest for the weary soul?
'T were vain the ocean depths to sound,

Or pierce to either pole.
2 The world can never give

The bliss for which we sigh ;
'T is not the whole of life to live,

Nor all of death to die.
3 Beyond this vale of tears,

There is a life above,
Unmeasured by the flight of years ;

And all that life is love :-
4 There is a death, whose pang

Outlasts the fleeting breath;
0, what appalling horrors hang
Around the “ second death”!

5 Lord God of truth and grace,

Teach us that death to shun,
Lest we be banished from thy face,

And utterly undone.
6 Here would we end our quest;

Alone are found in thee
The life of perfect love, - the rest

Of immortality. 597.

78. M.

MONTGOMERY.
The Redeemed in Heaven.
1 WHO are these in bright array,

This exulting, happy throng,
Round the altar night and day,

Hymning one triumphant song?
Worthy is the Lamb, once slain,

Blessing, honor, glory, power,
Wisdom, riches, to obtain,

New dominion every hour."
2 These through fiery trials trod ;

These from great affliction came;
Now, before the throne of God,

Sealed with his almighty name :
Clad in raiment pure and white,

Victor-palms in every hand,
Through their great Redeemer's might,

More than conquerors they stand.
3 Hunger, thirst, disease, unknown,

On immortal fruits they feed;
Them the Lamb, amidst the throne,

Shall to living fountains lead;
Joy and gladness banish sighs ;

Perfect love dispels all fears ;
And for ever from their

eyes
God shall wipe away their tears.
598.

L. M. 6 L.
The visible World a Shadow of the invisible.
1 I PRAISED the earth in beauty seen,

With garlands gay of various green ;
I praised the sea, whose ample field
Shone glorious as a silver shield ;
And earth and ocean seemed to say,
“ Our beauties are but for a day.”

HEBER.

2 I praised the sun, whose chariot rolled

On wheels of amber and of gold;
I praised the moon, whose softer eye
Gleamed sweetly through the summer sky ;
And moon and sun in answer said,

“Our years are told when we must fade." 3 O God, O, good beyond compare !

If thus thy meaner works are fair,
If thus thy bounties gild the span
Of sinful earth and mortal man,
How glorious must thy mansion be
Where thy redeemed shall dwell with thee.

599
C. M.

WATTS.
Death and immediate Glory.
1 THERE is a house not made with hands,

Eternal and on high ;
And here my spirit waiting stands,

Till God shall bid it fly.
2 We walk by faith of joys to come;

Faith lives upon his word ;
But while the body is our home,

We're absent from the Lord.
3 Shortly this prison of my clay

Must be dissolved and fall;
Then, O my soul,

with joy obey
Thy Heavenly Father's call.

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600.

C. M.
The Christian in the Prospect of Death.
1 0, MOST delightful hour by man

Experienced here below,
The hour that terminates his span,

His folly, and his woe. 2 Worlds should not bribe me back to tread.

Again life's dreary waste,
To see again my day o'erspread

With all the gloomy past.
3 My_home henceforth is in the skies ;

Earth, seas, and sun, adieu !
All heaven unfolded to my eyes, -

I have no sight for you.

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