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IX. Not death—death was no more refuge or rest; Not life—it was despair to be!—not sleep, For fiends and chasms of fire had dispossest All natural dreams: to wake was not to weep, But to gaze, mad and pallid, at the leap To which the Future, like a snaky scourge, Or like some tyrant's eye, which aye doth keep Its withering beam upon his slaves, did urge Their steps; they heard the roar of Hell's sulphureous surge. X. Each of that multitude alone, and lost To sense of outward things, one hope yet knew ; As on a soam-girt crag some seaman tost, Stares at the rising tide, or like the crew Whilst now the ship is splitting through and through; Each, if the tramp of a far steed was heard, Started from sick despair, or if there flew One murmur on the wind, or if some word Which none can gather yet, the distant crowd has stirr'd. XI.

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XV. “Ye Princes of the Earth, ye sit aghast Amid the ruin which yourselves have made; Yes, desolation heard your trumpet's blast, And sprang from sleep!—dark Terror has obey'd Your bidding—O, that I whom ye have made Your foe, could set my dearest enemy free From pain and fear! but evil casts a shade, Which cannot pass so soon, and Hate must be

The nurse and parent still of an ill progeny.

XVI. “Ye turn to Heaven for aid in your distress; Alas, that ye, though mighty and the wise, Who, if ye dared, might not aspire to less Than ye conceive of power, should fear the lies Which thou, and thou, didst frame for mysteries To blind your slaves:—consider your own thought, An empty and a cruel sacrifice Ye now prepare, for a vain idol wrought

Out of the fears and hate which vain desires have

brought.

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XVIII.

The warm touch of a soft and tremulous hand Waken'd me then ; lo, Cythna sate reclined Beside me, on the waved and golden sand Of a clear pool, upon a bank o'ertwined With strange and star-bright flowers, which to the wind Breathed divine odor; high above, was spread The emerald heaven of trees of unknown kind, Whose moonlike blooms and bright fruit overhead A shadow, which was light, upon the waters shed.

XIX. And round about sloped many a lawny mountain With incense-bearing forests, and vast caves Of marble radiance to that mighty fountain; And where the flood its own bright margin laves, Their echoes talk with its eternal waves, Which, from the depths whose jagged caverns breed Their unreposing strife, it lists and heaves, Till through a chasm of hills they roll, and feed A river deep, which flies with smooth but arrowy speed. XX. As we sate gazing in a trance of wonder, A boat approach'd, borne by the musical air Along the waves which sung and sparkled under Its rapid keel—a winged shape sate there, A child with silver-shining wings, so fair, That as her bark did through the waters glide, The shadow of the lingering waves did wear Light, as from starry beams; from side to side, While veering to the wind, her plumes the bark did guide. XXI. The boat was one curved shell of hollow pearl, Almost translucent with the light divine Of her within ; the prow and stern did curl Horned on high, like the young moon supine, When o'er dim twilight mountains dark with pine, It floats upon the sunset's sea of beams, Whose golden waves in many a purple line Fade fast, till borne on sunlight's ebbing streams, Dilating, on earth's verge the sunken meteor gleams.

XXII.

Its keel has struck the sands beside our feet;-
Then Cythna turn'd to me, and from her eyes
Which swam with unshed tears, a look more sweet
Than happy love, a wild and glad surprise,
Glanced as she spake: “Ay, this is Paradise
And not a dream, and we are all united'
Lo, that is mine own child, who in the guise
Of madness came, like day to one benighted

In lonesome woods: my heart is now too well re

quited'." XXIII. And then she wept aloud, and in her arms Clasp'd that bright Shape, less marvellously fair Than her own human hues and living charms; Which, as she lean'd in passion's silence there, Breathed warmth on the cold bosom of the air, Which seem'd to blush and tremble with delight: The glossy darkness of her streaming hair Fell o'er that snowy child, and wrapt from sight The sond and long embrace which did their hearts unite.

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Between the walls of mighty mountains crown'd
With Cyclopean piles, whose turrets proud,
The homes of the departed, dimly frown'd

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XLI. Motionless resting on the lake awhile, I saw its marge of snow-bright mountains rear Their peaks aloft, I saw each radiant isle, And in the midst, asar, even like a sphere Hung in one hollow sky, did there appear The Temple of the Spirit; on the sound Which issued thence, drawn nearer and more near, Like the swift moon this glorious earth around,

o'er the bright waves which girt their dark sounda-The charmed boat approach'd, and there its haven

tious round.

found.

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