Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

625.

C. M. BROWNE.
Reflections at the Close of the Year.

J AND now, our souls, another year
Of our short life is past:
We cannot long continue here;
And this may be our last.

2 Part of our doubtful life is gone,
Nor will return again;

And swift our fleeting moments run-
The few which yet remain !

3 Awake, our souls! with all our cares
Our true condition learn;

What are our hopes-how sure, how fair,
And what our great concern?

4 Now a new space of life begins,
Set out afresh for heaven:
Seek pardon for thy former sins,
Through Christ, so freely given.
5 Devoutly yield thyself to God,
And on his grace depend;

With zeal pursue the heavenly road,
Nor doubt a happy end.

626.

8s & 7s. BP. HORNE.

Autumnal Warnings.

1 SEE the leaves around us falling,
Dry and withered to the ground;
Thus to thoughtless mortals calling,
In a sad and solemn sound:-

2 "Youth, on length of days presuming,
Who the paths of pleasure tread :
View us, late in beauty blooming,
Numbered now among the dead:
What though yet no losses grieve you,
Gay with health and many a grace,
t not cloudless skies deceive you:
Summer gives to autumn place.

Yearly in our course returning,
Messengers of shortest stay,

Thus we preach this truth concerning,
Heaven and, earth shall pass away.'

5 On the tree of life eternal,
O let all our hopes be laid:
This alone, for ever vernal,

Bears a leaf that shall not fade. 627. C. M. CHRISTIAN PSALMIST.

Thanks for an abundant Harvest.
1 FOUNTAIN of mercy, God of love!
How rich thy bounties are!
The rolling seasons, as they move,
Proclaim thy constant care.

2 When in the bosom of the earth
The sower hid the grain,

Thy goodness marked its secret birth,
And sent the early rain.

3 The spring's sweet influence, Lord, was The plants in beauty grew:

Thou gav'st refulgent suns to shine,
And mild, refreshing dew.

4 These various mercies from above
Matured the swelling grain;

A kindly harvest crowns thy love,
And plenty fills the plain.

[thine:

5 We own and bless thy gracious sway;
Thy hand all nature hails;

Seed-time nor harvest, night nor day,
Summer nor winter, fails.

628.

C. M.

ANONYMOUS.

Wedding Hymn.

1 SINCE Jesus freely did appear
To grace a marriage feast;
O Lord, we ask thy presence here,
To make a wedding guest.

2 Upon the bridal pair look down,
Who now have plighted hands;
Their union with thy presence crown,
And bless their nuptial bands.

3 With gifts of grace their hearts endov
Of all rich dowries best;

Their substance bless, and peace bes
To sweeten all the rest.

4 In purest love their souls unite,
That they, with Christian care,
May make domestic burdens light,
By taking each their share.

5 True helpers may they prove indeed,
In prayer, in faith, and hope,
And see with joy a goodly seed,
To build their household up.
6 As Isaac and Rebekah give
A pattern chaste and kind,
So may this married couple live;
And die in friendship join'd.

7 On every soul assembled here,
Now make thy face to shine;

Thy goodness more our hearts can cheer, Than richest food or wine.

629.

MISCELLANEOUS.

C. M. BP. HEBER.

Early Religion.

1 BY cool Siloam's shady rill

How sweet the lily grows!

How sweet the breath beneath the hill
Of Sharon's dewy rose!

2 Lo, such the child whose early feet
The paths of peace have trod;
Whose secret heart, with influence sweet,
Is upward drawn to God!

3 By cool Siloam's shady rill

The lily must decay;

The rose that blooms beneath the hill

Must shortly fade away.

4 And soon, too soon, the wintry hour

Of man's maturer age

Will shake the soul with sorrow's power,

And stormy passion's rage!

thou who giv'st us life and breath,
We seek thy grace alone,

childhood, manhood, age and death,

To keep us still thine own!

630.

L. M.

STENNETT.

1 HOW soft the words our Saviour speaks! How kind the promises he makes! A bruised reed he never breaks,

Nor will he quench the smoking flax.

2 The humble poor he won't despise,
Nor on the contrite sinner frown
His ear is open to their cries;
He quickly sends salvation down.

3 When piety, in early minds,

Like tender buds begins to shoot,
He guards the plants from threat'ning winds,
And ripens blossoms into fruit.

4 With humble souls he bears a part
In all the sorrows they endure:
Tender and gracious is his heart,
His promise is for ever sure.

5 He sees the struggles that prevail
Between the powers of grace and sin;
He kindly listens while they tell
The bitter pangs they feel within.

6 Though press'd with fears on every side,
They know not how the strife may end;
Yet he will soon the cause decide,
And judgment unto victory send.

[blocks in formation]

Advantages of early Religion.

1 HAPPY the child whose tender years
Receive instructions well;

Who hates the sinner's path, and fears
The road that leads to hell.

2 When we devote our youth to God,
'Tis pleasing in his eyes;

A flower when offered in the bud
Is no vain sacrifice.

3 'Tis easier work if we begin
To fear the Lord betimes;

While sinners, who grow old in sin,
Are hardened in their crimes.

4 'Twill save us from a thousand snares
To mind religion young;

Grace will preserve our following years,
And make our virtue strong.

5 To thee, almighty God! to thee
Our childhood we resign:

'Twill please us to look back and see
That our whole lives were thine.

6 Let the sweet work of prayer and praise Employ our youngest breath:

Thus, we're prepared for longer days,
Or fit for early death.

632.

C. M.

DODDRIDGE.

Young persons encouraged to seek Christ. 1 YE hearts with youthful vigour warm, In smiling crowds draw near,

And turn from every mortal charm,
A Saviour's voice to hear.

2 The soul that longs to see my face,
Is sure my love to gain;

And those that early seek my grace,
Shall never seek in vain.

3 What object, Lord, our souls should move,
If once compared with thee?
What beauty should command our love,
Like what in Christ we see?

4 Away, ye false delusive toys,

Vain tempters of the mind!

'Tis here we fix our lasting choice, And here true bliss we find.

633.

C. M. SALISBURY COLL.

Remember thy Creator in the days of thy youth.

IN the soft season of thy youth,
In nature's smiling bloom,
Ere age arrive, and trembling wait
Its summons to the tomb;

Remember thy Creator, God;

For him thy powers employ;
Make him thy fear, thy love, thy hope,
Thy confidence, thy joy.

« AnteriorContinuar »