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Methodists in his Memoirs. In 1806 he removed from Alvestone to Taunton, the town in which he served his apprenticeship, where he purchased some houses, and expended 30001. in erecting a chapel for the use of the Wesleyan Methodists, to which he added a salary of 150l. per annum for the preacher. In front of this building appears the following inscription :

“This Temple is erected as a monument of God's mercy, in convincing an Infidel of the important Truths of Christianity.

“Man, consult thy whole existence, and be safe.”

The Wesleyan Methodists continued to preach in this chapel until 1810, when a dispute arose between Mr Lackington and the Conference, respecting the conveyance of the same, according to the Wesleyan scheme of church government, from which the latter could not deviate. The terms upon which the conveyance was required being deemed illiberal by Mr Lackington, he requested the president of the New Connection, named Kilhamites,* to send him a preacher. His request was attended to, and a Mr Henley was despatched to Taunton to preach in Mr Lackington's chapel; and, as he possessed considerable eloquence and abilities, it was much frequented during the year that he officiated. At the expiration of that period, however, being informed that the principles of Mr Henley bordered on Calvinism, Mr Lackington applied once more to the Conference, who sent him a Mr Beaumont, with whom he soon after engaged in a paper war, which at length terminated in the purchase of the chapel by the Wesleyans for 10001. Mr Lackington continued to reside at Taun

* So called from Alexander Kilham, formerly a Wesleyan preacher of some note; but, dissenting from his brethren on the subject of church government, he was expelled the Connection, on which event he raised a society of his own, which has since been called “The New Connection."

ton for two years longer, when his health declining, he determined to live by the sea-side, and finally chose Budleigh Sulterton, in Devonshire, for his future abode. Here he built another chapel, which cost him 20001., and appointed Mr Hawkey, a retired captain in the army, whose father had been recorder of Exeter, his minister, with a salary of 1501. per annum. This salary, with the use of the chapel, Mr Hawkey was to enjoy for his life, after which, the latter was to fall to the Wesleyan connection, and the money appropriated to secure the salary to be divided among the donor's relations.

Soon after this event the health of the eccentric subject of this little volume rapidly declined, and he became subject to epileptic fits. These were succeeded by apoplexy and paralysis, under the effect of which he survived longer than might have been expected, until at length his decease took place on the 22nd of November 1815, in the seventieth year of his age, and his remains were interred in Budleigh church-yard.

It is easy to find more important autobiographies than that of this pertinacious bookseller, sceptic and methodist, but few are more lively, curious, or characteristic.

INDEX.

PAGE
Author's motives for publishing his Life......

14
Author's gratitude to his customers

7
Author's thanks to some booksellers
Additions since the first edition, why not printed sepa-
rately

22
All alive, alive 0! in W- cathedral

39
Author's birth not predicted, nor his nativity calculated 31
bound apprentice to a shoemaker

50
learns to read; is born again

56
his rigid application to study of divinity. 65
leaps out of a two-story window to hear a Me.
thodist sermon

67
becomes a backslider

79
arrives at Bristol

82
forms a friendship with Mr John Jones

89
strange mode of life.

99
composes songs before he could write

92
relapses into Methodism

94
converts his friends

96
great talents for controversy..

100
lucubrations like to prove fatal.

100
lives on bread and tea only

103
travels to Bridgewater, Taunton, Exeter, and
Kingsbridge

105
teaches himself to write

106
leaves Kingsbridge

107
returns to Bristol ...

ib.
falls in love with a dairy-maid ; his spiritual
courtship .....

109
attaches himself to Hannah Allen, another holy
sister

111
married to Nancy Smith, the dairy-maid

114

PAGR
Author begins the world with a halfpenny

115
lives op water-gruel to support his sick wife 118
sets off for, and arrives in, London

121
is shocked at the wickedness of London ; his
consolation

122
goes to receive his legacy, loses part, commits
a faux-pas

125
turns bookseller ; his motive for so doing

130
marries Miss Turton...

150
attention to metaphysics

157
quits the Methodists; some reasons why 158
general opinion of Methodists

172
cannot be rivalled in business

231
mode of stating his profits and expenses. 258
visits his old masters..

290
Amorous gentleman and blundering ostler, a story. 84
Abstinence taught, but not practised, by preachers 158
Apple and old iron-stall keepers turn preachers

190
Almanack vender

49
An old buck tempted by his maid and the devil .. 75
A man to speak less of himself than he really is, is
folly, not modesty

261
A man believes himself to be the Holy Ghost.

188
Anecdotes very curious of very spiritual ladies

138
Anecdotes of very carnal and very spiritual ladies 142
Authors publishing and selling their own books never

227
Authors should be careful in choosing their publishers ib.
Address to covetuous tradesmen

256
Anecdote of an author's great expectations.

226
Birth and genealogy of the author

31
Bayhorse, a story

38
Black and white devil, a story

42
Bowden family, characters of; their library

50
Bowden, George and John converted

55
Band meetings, account of

74
-, select, only for such as are perfect .

76
Booksellers are benefited by our authors selling cheap 263
Baldwin, Mr, a strange story of

86
Bookselling succeeds with our hero

133
Bottomly, Shaw and Wheeler, save the author from
ruin

149

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