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TEACHER'S LESSONS

ON THE

CREATION;

WITH

A CATECHISM.

BY

CHARLES BAKER,

HEAD MASTER OF THE YORKSHIRE INSTITUTION FOR THE
DEAF AND DUMB, AUTHOR OF "A TBACHER'3 LESSONS
ON 8CR1PTURE CHARACTERS," *fA TEACHER'S FIRST
LESSONS ON RELIGION," ETC.

* Thou hast created all things, and for thy pleasure they are and
were created."Book of the Revelation.

Edition;

Longman And Co. Paternoster Row; 8ekley8, Fleet-
Strkkt; Nisbet, Berners-strest; Houlbtons, Pa-
Ternoster-row; Hammond, Birmingham; Mozleys.
Derby I Charles Whits, Doncabter; And Srookh
And Co. Doncaster.

Mdcccxxxiii.

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TEACHER'S LESSONS

ON THE

CREATION;

WITH

A CATECHISM.

CHARLES BAKER,

HEAD MASTER OF THE YORKSHIRE INSTITUTION FOR THE DEAK AND DUMB, AUTHOR OP •* A TEACHER'S LESSONS ON SCRIPTURE CHARACTERS," "A TEACHER'S FIRST LESSONS ON RELIGION," ETC.

'Thou hast created all things, and for thy pleasure they are and were created."Book of the Revelation.

EonHon;

LONGMAN AND CO. PATERNOSTER ROW; SEELEYS, FLKXTSTREET; NISBET, BERNKRS-STREBT; HOULSTONS, PATERNOSTBR-ROW; HAMMOND, BIRMINGHAM; MOZLEY3, DERBY; CHARLES WHITE, DONCASTBR t AND BROOKK AND CO. DONCASTER.

MDCCeXXXIII.

NOTE.—The Author of a Teacher's Lessons is aware that two little works on the subject of this small volume have been lately published. He was engaged on the subject ot the Creation before he knew of the " Child's Book of the Creation" by Mr. Goodrich; and the subject matter of his lessons on the soul of man was written several years apo, long before he had seen Mr. Gallaudet's little work on the same subject. The merits of the lattei work demand a most respectful notice: Mr. T. H. Gallaudet is personally unknown to the Author of these pages, but well known as a successful and eminent teacher of the deaf and dumb in America. The train of reasoning pursued in the following lessons is not dissimilar to that pursued in Mr. Gallaudet's small work. There is no doubt but that he fell into such a course of treating a very difficult subject while analyzing it for his deaf and dumb pupils; the Author of a Teacher's Lessons arrived at his end by similar means, and this may sufficiently account for a certain degree of similarity.

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PREFACE.

Children begin to exercise their thinking and reasoning faculties at a very early age. Our daily experience shews us that they do so in all matters personally connected with themselves. A good opportunity for observing the extent to which children reason is, when they are busied among their toys: they do nothing without an object, as we should be clearly assured, if the little creatures had language with which to express their mental impulses. And it is truly wonderful, how soon we may begin to reason with infants;—long before they begin to speak, they can understand what is said to them, and they shew forth their emotions at what they hear, in even a more expressive way than language could dictate. It is at this time that education should commence. In the first stage by shewing that we are interested in their little pleasures, and by leading them to draw correct conclusions: next by encouraging and assisting them to express their ideas in the simple

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