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Man's abuses of power.--contrasted with the Benevolence of the Deity.--
Loss of the ten tribes. Inferences-- The Messiah was the great object
of the Old Testament dispensation. . The very existence of the Jews de-
pended upon their connexion with the Savior.--The captivity of Judah,
when? and by whom? Intermediate events---The reading of the roll---
Nebuchadnezzar's first vision explained by Daniel---Total ruin of Jerusa-
lem.--Description of Babylon --lts walls.--The bridge and banks of the
river.--Canals---Palace, hanging gardens, and temple---Nebuchadnezzar's
pride and fall; related in his decree;--Obscurely hinted in Abydenus.--
Confirmed by Herodotus—Asserted by Josephus—Gathered from Ptole-
my's Canon--- His reign and works mentioned by Berosus, Megasthenes,
Diocles, and Philostratus---Evil Merodach succeeds him---Then Nerig-
lasser---Then Belshazzar—Babylon taken by Cyrus---The Jews restored
--Improvement---The facility with which God can punish nations---Ele.
vation sometimes bestowed upon the worst of characters--The power of
the wicked limited---War a dreadful curse---Let us seek a better world!

Luke 1 1, 1-7. 1 Cox. xv, 3-8. 2 Pet. 1, 16. --Sublimity allied to

terror-- Go! alike great in every point of view --The former dispensa-

tion has yielded to one more simple and more spiritual---The obscurity of

antiquity left behind.:-The subject stated.--It relates to facts transpiring

in the zenith of the glory of kome---Expectations of the world at this

period-- Extract from Virgil's Pollio --compared with Isaiah’s predictions

---Tranquility of all nations---The decree of Augustus.--Conjectures

respecting this tax, and its extent-- Inns of the East---Poverty of the Sa-

viol’s birth--It is announced to the Shepherds...Journey of the Magi–

who they were---the star which conducted them-- their country---Testi-

monies of Pliny and Chalcidius to this circumstance.--Cruelty of Herod

---Evidence that Christ had been in Egypt.--Testimony of Josephus res.

pecting him-- Julian, Porphyry, and Celsus allow his works---His death

---Acts of Pilate---asserted by Justi: Martyr and Tertullian - Manner of

it mentioned by Tacitus and by Lucian.---Miracles attending his death--

Darkness supernatural -- Testimony of Phlegon.- of Suidas--and the re-

mark of Dionysius the Areopagite---Burial of the Savior... Evidences of

the resurrection---Plea of the guards answered in seven different ways---

Ascension--Testimony 6f Pliny to the early worship of Christ...General

evidences of Quadra" us--Tertullian, and Arnobius---Improvement---Rev-

elation resembles the guiding Swar---in its nature --in its source.--in ius

object---and in its issue. - -

‘THE CHARACTElt OF THE Wit ITERS OF THE OLD AND NEW
Trest a MEN'i s.
1 Jo HN 1. 1–3. HE E. x 1.36–33.-Sensations excited in heaven and

of all nations—They were for the most part eye-witnesses of the facts
which they recorded—What they did not see they derived from the most
certain evidences—Their integrity—Their impartiality—Their candor--
Their wisdom—Their holiness—Their lives contrasted with those of
their opponents—Their motives disinterested—proved by their actions—
and by their preaching—Their testimony respecting themselves—They
believed what they taught—proved by their sufferings—They were
guided by that which they preached—proved by the correspondence
of their lives—They could not be deceived in the facts which they re-
late—they would not deceive—proved from their acknowledged charac-
ters—and from their criminality, supposing it possible—Their views
stated, and their prejudices—Their appeals considered—The concession
of their enemies—Improvement—The allowances to be made in reading
the scriptures—and the spirit in which they should be consulted.

LECTURE XIV.

PAGE 377–397.

the UNSEARCHABLE GOD: or, AN Attempt to PROVE AN
ANALOGY BETWEEN THE RELIGION OF NATURE AND THAT OF
THE BIBLE, BY SHEWING THAT THE SAME OBSCURITY WHICH

ov ERs HADows RF v ELATION, Equ ALLY overts PREADs NATURF.
an D PROVIDENCE.

Jon xxxvi. 14 —Mañ, a needy dependent creature—in his infancy—
his childhood—his youth—his manhood—his death—Revelation meets
him on the terms of his nature—Magnitude, beauty, and wisdom, com.
parative terms—Limitation of human powers—Created minds swallow.
ed up in the Deity—The subject stated—God unsearchable in the works
of creation—Ignorance of man in early ages—Progress of philosophy—
Our present ignorance of the planetary system—Attempts to reach the
poles frustrated—Our ignorance of the minutiae of nature, and of the
structure of the human frame—God unsearchable in providence—its mys-
teries relative to empires—The assistance of Revelation—its perplexi-
ties relative to individuals—Partial illumination from the Bible—Our ig-
morance of the invisible worlds—These were once unknown altogether—
Their existence is now clearly proved in the Scriptures—Their nature is
general is ascertained—But faw particulars respecting them have trans-
pired—God unsearchable in the word of Revelation—Its general truths
exhibited—its promises—Concession respecting its difficulties: but in
this very point consists its arralogy with nature and providence—These
all are but partial views of the Deity—The thunder of his power is incon-
ceivable—Illustrations—Conclusion.

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Writers quoted, or referred to, in the course of the Lectures, with their respective dates.

MoDERNs.

Pearson

Grotius

Usher -
Milton - -
Addison

Rollin

Saurin

Burnet

Whiston

M. de la Pryme

Taylor

Prideaux

Bryant

Shaw

Pocoke

Volney

Bisselius

Allix

Doddridge

Horne

Poole

Bruce

Watson o
Geddes

Burn

St. Pierre
Ancient Universal History
Humphrys's Annotations
Encyclopedia Britannica

B. C. OR Ph Eus. - - 1000 Hesiod - - . 900 Homer - - 850 Sanchoniathan - . 760 Xenophanes - - 620 born - 484 Herodotus died - 413 Plato - - . 348 Aristotle - - . 32 Diocles - - - S21 Abydenus - - 300 Megasthenes - . .298 Menander - - 293 Strato Lampsacenus . 288 Lycophron . - 276 Manetho - - 261 Aristobulus - - 124 Diodorus Siculus - . 44 Cicero - - - 43 Trogus Pompeius . - 41 Catullus - - - 40 Virgil - - - 18 A. 1). Nicholaus Demascenus - 6 Suidas - - . 11 Ovid - - - 17 Strabo - - . 25 Apion - - - - 35 Philo—about - - . 50 Lucanus - - . 65 Seneca - - - 65 Pliny the elder - - 80 Solinus - - - 81 Josephus—died - 95 Pliny the younger - 103 Plutarch - - 119 Juvenal - - 128 AElian - - . 140 Justin - - 148 Justin Martyr - - 163 Lucian - - ... 130 Origen - - 200 Clemens Alexandrinus . 220 Philostratus - * . 241 Ocellus Lucanus - 250 Cyprian - * - 258 I.onginus - - 273 Tacitus. - - 276

A.D.

Chalcidius—in the third cen

tury
Arnobius
Porphyry -
Eusebius - -
Julian f - - -
- of Alexandria
Cyrillus 3: Jerusalem
Epiphanius—died
AEncus Gazeus -
Alexander Trallianus
Hermippas
Rhodigenus -
N. }~
Eupolemus

300
304
342
$63
386
444
403
490

-JZ

1600 1645 1655 1674 1719 1741

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Canst thou by searching find out God? Canst thou find out the Almighty unto perfection? It is high as heaven, what canst thou do? deeper than hell, what caust thou know? The measure thereof is longer than the earth, and broader than the sea!

To enlarge the sphere of knowledge, and to increase the sum of happiness in the present world, is an object worthy the attention of every friend of human nature; and the effort, even should it fail, deserves the approbation and the applause of wise and good men: but to provide consolation against the severest moments of trial, to disperse the cloud which hangs over “the valley of the shadow of death,” and to conduct the immortal spirit safe to the throne of the invisible God, is a purpose far more sublime, and an exertion of still greater utility. To shed lustre over a few years, or to live in remembrance a century or two, and then to be forgotten, is comparatively of small importance: yet for this the scholar labors, and the hero endures hardship—this is the summit of human ambition, and the boundary of its most Sanguine expectations. To shine on the roll of one. to pluck honors which fade like the flower of the field, while you gather them, or to sparkle among the favorites of fortune, is of little avail to man, who must soon resign to the merciless grasp of death, even the sceptre of the world, were it committed to his possession. Yet these things are sought amid repeated disappointments; and the golden bait is received with increased avidity, although barbed with anguish and sorrow. But who regards the silent finger of religion pointing to an inheritance above the stars, promising splendors which shall never expire, and waiting to crown the man, who obeys her gracious admonitions, with honor, glory, and immortality? When I remember the occasion on which I stand before this large assembly, and the awful engagement which, at the solicitation of many among you, I have undertaken—I shrink from my subject, and enter upon the discussion of it with “fear and trembling.” To , throw down the gauntlet, and to enter the list with winning and attractive fashion, is a bold and daring effort. It will be admitted that this is a day of prevailing infidelity; and Surely it will also be allowed, that it is the duty of every man, who sustains the sacred office of a Christian minister, to “contend earnestly for the faith once delivered to the saints,” and to “give a reason for the hope that is in him.” On this principle the Lecturer presumes to offer his mite to the Lord of the Treasury towards the support of this great and common cause. It may be asked, why hoary age should not rather enter upon this arduous work? Would to God that more efforts were made on the part of able and faithful ministers, equally venerable for years and for literature, against the common enemy! Those, however, who imagine that age should exclusively wield the “two-edged sword” against skepticism, will dowellto re

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