Romance, Poetry, and Surgical Sleep: Literature Influences Medicine

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1995 - 162 páginas

Pain and suffering, once associated with punishment for sin, became regarded as a purposeless evil that was hostile to human welfare. The works of Thomas Beddoes, Coleridge, and Shelley embody the change in attitude toward suffering and lay the groundwork for the general use of anesthesia in modern medicine. Papper contends that there was no real societal readiness to treat or prevent pain until the idea of the worth of the common man or woman was established by the upheaval of the French Revolution. The humanitarian concepts that we take for granted were relatively recent developments in Western society and were associated with the recognition of the importance of the individual.

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Contenido

An Ansthesiologists Attempts to Understand Pain and Suffering as a MedicalLiterary Conglomerate
1
The Discovery of AnesthesiaAn Outgrowth of an Understanding About the Prevention of Pain and Suffering
27
Thomas Beddoes Sr Physician and Philosopher
37
The Importance of Bristol as a Site for the Pneumatic Institute Beddoes and Bristol
49
The Recruitment of Scientists Writers and Experimenters for the Pneumatic Institute
63
Samuel Taylor Coleridge Pain and Suffering as Experience
75
Percy Bysshe Shelley
109
Commentary and Summary
131
Epilogue
137
Supplementary Reading
147
Index
157
About the Author
Derechos de autor

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Página 127 - The breath whose might I have invoked in song Descends on me; my spirit's bark is driven, Far from the shore, far from the trembling throng Whose sails were never to the tempest given; The massy earth and sphered skies are riven! I am borne darkly, fearfully, afar; Whilst burning through the inmost veil of Heaven, The soul of Adonais, like a star, Beacons from the abode where the Eternal are.
Página 125 - To suffer woes which Hope thinks infinite; To forgive wrongs darker than death or night; To defy Power, which seems omnipotent; To love, and bear; to hope till Hope creates From its own wreck the thing it contemplates...
Página 97 - For not to think of what I needs must feel, But to be still and patient, all I can; And haply by abstruse research to steal From my own nature all the natural man This was my sole resource, my only plan: Till that which suits a part infects the whole, And now is almost grown the habit of my soul.
Página 78 - Science is pleasure ; but the knowledge of the one cleaves to us as a necessary part of our existence, our natural and unalienable inheritance ; the other is a personal and individual acquisition, slow to come to us, and by no habitual and direct sympathy connecting us with our fellow-beings.
Página 118 - Poetry is indeed something divine. It is at once the centre and circumference of knowledge ; it is that which comprehends all science, and that to which all science must be referred. It is at the same time the root and blossom of all other systems of thought...
Página 29 - My heart leaps up when I behold A rainbow in the sky: So was it when my life began; So is it now I am a man; So be it when I shall grow old, Or let me die! The Child is father of the Man; And I could wish my days to be Bound each to each by natural piety.
Página 119 - It is impossible to / read the compositions of the most celebrated writers of the present day without being startled with the electric life which burns within their words. They measure the circumference and sound the depths of human nature with a comprehensive and all-penetrating spirit, and they are themselves perhaps the most sincerely astonished at its manifestations; for it is less their spirit than the spirit of the age.
Página 78 - The man of science seeks truth as a remote and unknown benefactor ; he cherishes and loves it in his solitude : the poet, singing a song in which all human beings join with him, rejoices in the presence of truth as our visible friend and hourly companion.

Acerca del autor (1995)

E. M. PAPPER is Professor of Anesthesiology and Pharmacology at the University of Miami School of Medicine where he was Dean of the Faculty of Medicine until 1981. He is the author of hundreds of publications and is one of the legends of American anesthesiology.

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