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... Further to illustrate the doctrine of election, and if possible, to commend it to every man’s conscience, we may attend to some particular remarks. i. The elect are not chosen to salvation, on account of any good disposition, or moral excellency which they possess; nor on account of any foreseen repentance, faith, or obedience. Election, as well as regeneration, is of free grace, and is absolutely unconditional. The subjects of election are “chosen in Christ before the foundation of the world,” not because they are, in any measure, holy; but “that they should be holy, and without blame before him in love.” “Who maketh thee to differ from another ? and what hast thou, that thou didst not receive?” The difference that takes place between the elect and others, is the fruit and consequence, and not the ground and reason of their election. In the case of Paul, and many others, election to salvation could not be owing to any foreseen goodness. For it is abundantly evident, that, in their natural state, they were void of goodness; and that, in their renewed and converted state, their goodness was the fruit of the Holy Spirit. {& # the grace of God,” said Paul, “I am what I am.” . The repentance, faith and obedience of the elect were indeed foreseen by the omniscient God. But they were foreseen, as the effects, and not the cause of renewing grace; and renewing grace was foreseen as the effect of the election of God. Tepentance and faith are the gist of God; and this, precious gift is the fruit, and not the cause, or condition of his election. Had it not been for the election of God, and regenerating grace, never would there have been an instance of repentance towards God, and faith towards our Lord Jesus Christ. * 2. No man is elected to salvation, at all events, whether he be holy or unholy, penitent or impenitent. For it is plainly declared in the scriptures, that sinful men are “chosen to salvation through sanctification of the Spirit, and belief of the truth:” “Chosen in Christ, that they should be holy, and without blame before him in love.” Do we not read, that we must “follow peace with all men, and holiness, without which no man can see the Lord * How great is the error and absurdity of those who say, if they are elected they shall be saved at all events! and if not, then, at all events they shall be damned These are rash and groundless conclusions from the doctrine of election. Why does the Apostle exhort us to give diligence to make our calling and election sure P Repentance, faith in Christ, and holy obedi. ence to the divine requirements, which are considered as the condition of salvation, consist in the voluntary exercises of our own minds; and they are considered as our own acts and deeds. Without these, salvation is nowhere promised in the gospel. Of course, a neglect of duty cuts off the hope of salvation by the gracious election of God. 3. By electing a part of mankind to salvation, God does no injustice to the non-elect. All have sinned, and fallen under just condemnation. And all ought to be thankful, rather than envious, that God extends his grace to any of the fallen race of men. From a view of the perfections of God, and of his abundant grace, in the election and salvation of a multitude, which no man can number; we may rest assured, that, were it for his own glory, and the general good, to save all mankind, all would be saved; and even the universe would be delivered from both moral and natural evil. But, as matters are, “What if God, willing to shew his wrath, and make his power known, endureth, with much long-suffering, the vessels of whath, fitted to des. truction; and that he might make known the riches of his glory, on the vessels of mercy, which he had afore prepared unto glory Po If a wise king, having granted an act of pardon to all his rebellious subjects, on condition of true penitence; and finding all still persisting in their rebellious temper, could devise a way, whereby he could melt their hearts into submission to his government; he would then be at his option, whether to melt the hearts of all, or of a part only ; holding the rest as examples of vindictive wrath, and just punishment. If he can be sure to rid as many criminals, and just such individuals, from guilt and punishment, as the greatest good of his king

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dom requires; does he do injustice to the rest? Is it not
then a clear case, that the wise and holy election of God,
by which some are taken, and others i. is consistent
. perfect justice; and is doing no injury to the non-
elect! - -
4. It is evident, that, in his election, God is not a res-
pecter of persons. To despise the poor, and be partial
to the rich and honorable, is to respect persons. But,
in the exercise of mercy to the guilty, there is scarcely
room for partiality. But, effectually to guard against the
charge of partiality, “God hath,” generall; speaking,
“chosen the poor of this world; and made them rich in
faith, and heirs of his kingdom.” . In the bestowment of
his grace, he has an undoubted right, if the general good
require it, to make the last first, and the first last. “ Is
it not lawful for me to do what I will with mine own P”
5. The doctrine of election is consistent with the free
offers and invitations of the gospel. It has been, more
than once, made manifest, in the discussion of the sys-
tem of divine truth, that all mankind, sinners as well as
Saints, are free agents, and accountable to God. All
mankind, elect and non-elect, are under obligation to
repent and believe the gospel; to love God, and keep
his commandments; to embrace the Holy Saviour, and
be his faithful followers. On God’s part, “All things are
now ready.” An all-sufficient atonement is made; and
nothing prevents the salvation of sinners, but their own
evil heart of unbelief. Salvation is offered to all, and of
course, to the non-elect, as well as the elect. These, in
a state of nature, when they cannot be distinguished
from the elect, are the proper subjects of the offers of the
gospel. And when the non-elect perish in their sins, the
fault is wholly their own. God, in his word and provi-
dence, evidently treats mankind as free and accountable
creatures; and all the offers, invitations, entreaties, and
expostulations of the gospel, are evidently made with
erfect sincerity. In an important sense, he is not wil-
ing that any should perish, but that all should come to
repentance. In itself considered, he has no pleasure in
the death of him that dieth ; but that he turn from his evil

Corinth, the Lord declared, “I have much people in this city.” These could be God’s people, only by the election of God; for, as yet, they were, for the most part, in a state of heathen idolatry. In the first epistle of Peter, the church is styled a o, or elected generation: and in his second epistle, they who constitute the church, are called the elect, according to the foreknowledge of God the Father. Paul, describing the woeful state of the reprobate Jews, makes this exception, that “There is a remnant, according to the election of grace.” Thus the churches and followers of Christ are often denominated the elect. The doctrine of election is established by a single text respecting Jacob and Esau, “For the children being not yet born, neither having done any good or evil, that the purpose of God according to election might stand, not of works, but of him that calleth ; it was said unto her,” their mother Rebecca, The elder shall serve the younger.” As it is written, “Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated.” Between these twin brothers, the Lord, by his own purpose and election, made a wide, if not an everlasting distinction. Lest any should suppose that God’s election takes place in time, and has not been from eternity; we may notice some testimonies on this head. To the Ephesians, the Apostle says, “According as he hath chosen usin him, before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy.” Also, in his second letter to the Thessalonians, the Apostle expresses his thankfulness to God for the brethren, beloved of the Lord, because “God had from the beginning, or from eternity, chosen them to salvation, through sanctification of the Spirit, and belief of the truth.” And again; The manifold wisdom of God, displayed by the redeemed and elected church of Christ, is said to be “According to the eternal purpose, which he purposed in Christ Jesus our Lord.” "And in fact, the immutability of God implies, that his election and purposes are all eternal, and cannot be otherwise. For, he is without variableness, or shadow of turning, “he is the same yesterday, to day and forever.”

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* Further to illustrate the doctrine of election, and if

possible, to commend it to every man’s conscience, we
may attend to some particular remarks.
i. The elect are not chosen to salvation, on account
of any good disposition, or moral excellency which they
possess; nor on account of any foreseen repentance,
faith, or obedience. Election, as well as regeneration,
is of free grace, and is absolutely unconditional. The
subjects of election are “chosen in Christ before the
foundation of the world,” not because they are, in any
measure, holy; but “that they should be holy, and with-
out blame before him in love.” “Who maketh thee to
differ from another P and what hast thou, that thou didst
not receive?” The difference that takes place between
the elect and others, is the fruit and consequence, and
not the ground and reason of their election. In the case
of Paul, and many others, election to salvation could not
be owing to any foreseen goodness. For it is abundantly
evident, that, in their natural state, they were void of
goodness; and that, in their renewed and converted
state, their goodness was the fruit of the Holy Spirit.
{& * the grace of God,” said Paul, “I am what I am.”
. The repentance, faith and obedience of the elect were
indeed foreseen by the omniscient God. But they were
foreseen, as the effects, and not the cause of renewing
grace; and renewing grace was foreseen as the effect of
the election of God. Tepentance and faith are the gift
of God; and this, precious gift is the fruit, and not the
cause, or condition of his election. Had it not been for
the election of God, and regenerating grace, never would
there have been an instance of repentance towards God,
and faith towards our Lord Jesus Christ.
2. No man is elected to salvation, at all events,
whether he be holy or unholy, penitent or impenitent.
For it is plainly declared in the scriptures, that sinful
men are “chosen to salvation through sanctification of
the Spirit, and belief of the truth:” “Chosen in Christ,
that they should be holy, and without blame before him in
love.” Do we not o, that we must “follow peace with
all men, and holiness, without which no man can see the

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