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CONTENTS

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13
21
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speech, &c.

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EXERCISES ON INFLECTION.

Exercise 2. Disjunctive or

3. Direct Question, &c.

Conjunctive or

4. Negation opposed to affirmation

Comparison and contrast

5. Pause of Suspension

6. Tender Emotion

7. Indirect Question, &c.

8. Language of Authority, Surprise, &c.

9. Emphatic Succession, &c.

10. Emphatic Repetition

78

79

81

81

82

84

88

90

92

98

99

EXERCISES ON EMPHASIS.

Inflection

18. Difference between common and Intensive Inflection 110

EXERCISES ON MODULATION.

Exercise 19. COMPASS OF VOICE

TRANSITION

20. The power of Eloquence

21. Hohenlinden

22. Battle of Waterloo

23. Negro's Complaint

24. Marco Bozzaris

25. Extract from Paradise Lost

111

116

116

118

119

120

122

123
Mrs. Sigourney. 191

62. Love of Applause

Hawes. 192

63. Christian Integrity

Hawes. 193

64. Watch

j. Mason Good. 194

65. New social order in America

Douglas. 196

66. Voluntary Association

Douglas. 197

67. Bible Societies

Douglas. 198

68. Christ's entry into Jerusalem

Cunningham. 199

69. Evening Hymn

Monthly Vis. 200

70. Universal Peace

Chalmers. 201

71. The Elder's Death Bed

Prof. Wilson. 202

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Exercise

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72. Benevolence of God

Chalmers. 207

73. Death of Princess Charlotte

Robert Hall. 208

74. Remarkable preservation from death at Sea Prof. Wilson. 210

75. The Bible the best Classic

Grimke. 214

76. Fathers of New England

Sprague. 215

77. Duty of Literary men to their Country

Grimke. 218

78. Eulogy on Adams and Jefferson

Wirt. 219

79. The Greek Revolution

Webster. 221

80. Triumph of the Gospel

Phillip. 223

81. Duties and Prospects of New England Pres. Quincy. 225

82. The Sabbath School Teacher

Jumes. 227

83. Motives of the Gospel

Dwight. 228

84. Character of Richard Reynolds

Thorpe. 230

85. Address of the Bible Society-1816

Mason. 231

86. Roman Soldier; — Last days of Herculaneum Atherstone. 232

87. The Orphan Boy

Mrs. Opie. 235

88. Christian Consolation

236

89. Cruelty to Animals

Cowper. 237

90. Christianity

Muson. 238

91. Character of Mrs. Graham

Mason. 240

92. Living to God

Griffin. 241

93. Plea for Africa

Grifin. 243

94. Abolition of the Slave Trade

Christian Ols. 245

95. Eliza

Darwin. 246

96. Character of Mr. Brougham

248

97. Character of Mr. Wilberforce

250

98. Eulogium on Mr. Fox

Sheridan. 251

99. Death of Sheridan

Byron. 252

100. The last family of Eastern Greenland Montgomery. 254

101. The City and the Country

M'Donnough. 255

102. Summary Punishment

Scott. 257

103. On the receipt of his Mother's Picture

Cowper. 258

104. Extract from “ The Grave"

Montgomery. 259

105. Defence of Johnson

Curran. 260

106. Taking of Warsaw

· Campbell

. 262

107. Lord atham

Butler. 263

108. Mr. Fox, and Mr. Pitt

Butler. 265

109. Death of Lord Chatham

Percy. 266

110. Lord Mansfield

Percy. 268

111. Providential Distinctions

Pollok. 270

112. Eloquence of Bossuet

Butler. 271

113. Eloquence of Bourdaloue

Butler. 273

114. Eloquence of Bridaine

Butler. 275

115. Eloquence of Whitefield

Gillies. 276

116. Satan's Lamentation

Milton. 278

117. Eloquence of Sneridan

280

118. Spirit of the American Revolution

j.

Quincy, Jr. 282

119. America

Philips. 284

120. Patriotism of 1775

P. Henry. 286

121. The discontented Pendulum

Jane Taylor. 289

122. Valedictory Hymn

. N. Adams. 292

123. Scene from Pizarro

Kotzebue, 293

124. God

Derzhanir. 297

125. The Dead Sea

Croly. 299

126. New Missionary Hymn

S. F. Smith. 300

APPENDIX

301

.

THE

RHETORICAL READER.

CHAPTER I.

READING.

ITS CONNEXION WITH GOOD EDUCATION.

The art of reading well is indispensable to one who expects to be a public speaker; because the principles on which it depends are the same as those which belong to rhetorical delivery in general, and because nearly all bad speakers were prepared to be so, by early mismanagement of the voice in reading.

But the subject is one of common interest to all, who aim at a good education. Every intelligent father, who would have his son or daughter qualified to hold a respectable rank in well-bred society, will regard it as among the very first of polite accomplishments, that they should be able to read well. But beyond this, the talent may be applied to many important purposes of business, of rational entertainment, and of religious duty. Of the multitudes who are not called to speak in public, including the whole of one sex, and all but comparatively a few of the other, there is no one to whom the ability to read in a graceful and impressive manner, may not be of great value. In this country, then, where the advantages of education are open to all, and where it is a primary object with parents of all classes, to have their children well instructed, it would seem reasonable to presume that nearly all our youth, of both sexes, must be good readers. Yet the number who yan

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