Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

10. Truly, we would not offend you.
11. “Tried and convicted trăitor ? Who

says

this? Who'll prove' it at his peril on my head'? "Banished ?” I thank you for 't. It breaks my chain

MONOTONE.

When no inflection is used, a monotone, or same ness of tone, is produced.

The term monotone, in the language of elocution, should not be understood in its literal signification, as "a sound never varied,” but rather to imply the successive recurrence of the same radical pitch or tone, with a full, smooth, and prolonged stress of voice. Its low-pitched, solemn utterance may be said to resemble the repeated sounds of a deep-toned bell, with its perpetually recurring low note.

It is the language of awe, reverence, solemnity, grandeur, majesty, and power; especially when connected with the idea of supernatural agency, or influence. Emotions of amazement, terror, and horror are often expressed in monotone.

In its proper place, monotone can be employed with beauty and effect; but one of the most prominent faults in reading is a prevalent use of this mode of voice, without reference to appropriateness. This habit destroys every thing like feeling or expression, and is the chief cause of that wearisome sameness so common in the reading exercise of the school room. Teachers should be un. remitting in their efforts to counteract this tendency. To this end they should Smit no opportunity of showing the use and effect of the inflections and the circumflex; also, of leading the child to study the meaning of the selection to se read, and to give expression to the author's ideas by means of the proper vones, stress, pitch, and movement of the voice.

EXAMPLES OF MONOTONE.

The stars shall fade away, the sun himself

Grow dim with age, and nature sink in years. In thoughts from the visions of the night, when deep Bleep falleth on men, fear came upon me, and trembling, which made all my bones to shake. Then a spirit passed before my face; the hair of my flesh stood up: it stood still, but I could not discern the form thereof: an image was before mine eyes; there was silence, and I heard a voice, saying, Shall mortal man be mom just than God ? shall a man be more pure than hi Maker ?

WORDS OFTEN MISPRONOUNCED. The correct pronunciation of the following words should be learned by the pupil from a Pronouncing Dictionary. Worcester's Dictionaries are the most womplete and accurate in this department. See Pronunciation, on page 21.

[blocks in formation]

Abdomen
accent (v.)
accessory
acoru
mult
Mverse
advertise
again
aged
agyrandize
agile
alabaster
ally
Alternate
Amateur
amenable
anchovy
ancient
antipodes
apparent
Arab
Arabic
architect
archives
Rretio
are
kria
aroma
Asia
#spirant
wxylum
зуе

chest
clique
clothes
coadjutor
column
combatant
comely
comparable
compensate
complaisance
compromise
comrade
concentrate
confiscate, ed
coustrue
consummate
contemplate
contrary,
coutumely
conversant
coquetry
courier
courteous
creek

Sacrament
sacritice
saucy
sausage
scallop
scathi, -ing
series
sinecure
sirup
sloth
soirce
spaniel
specialty
species
spectace
splenetic
squirrel
stone
strew
suite
summary
sword
synod

Nasal
national
none
nothing

Gainsay
gather
gaunt
genuine
get
girl
glacier
governor
grievous
grimace
guardian

Daunt
debut
defalcation
demonstrate
desultory
devastate, es
diplomacy
discern
discrepant
discrepancy
dishabille
disputable
disputant
district
docile
does

Half
harass, -ing
hearth
heroin.
heroism
homage
horizon
humble
hundred

Tedious
tenet
threshold
thyme
tiny
tortoise
toward
transparent
tribune
truculent
truths
tune

Oasis
obdurate
often
opponent
orthocpist
Panegyric
parent
partrer
partridge
patent in.)
patent (adj.)
patriot
patriotism
pedestal
peremptory
pianist
piquant
placard
platina
precedent (n.)
jrcccdent (adj.)
precise
preiace
prestige
pretty
primary
progress
protege
puissant
Quay
Recess
recognize
reparable
reptile
rhubarb
robust
roof
root

Bala
onlig
beard
been
beneath
betroth
bitumen
bivouao
blasphemous
blithe
bonbaet
bonnet
bouquet
rethren
brooch
bulwark
Luoyant

Uranus

Idea
imbecile
impetus
intutile
inquiry
integri?
interested
isolate
isthumns
Italian
Italic

Vagary vehement viguette Wcapon well whole wly wiseacre withes

E’er
erotisma
elegiac
eleven
elin
enervate
engine
epliemeral
epirurean
epoch
ere
errard
European
every
excise

Juvenile

Calf bartridge catch celibasy Bellar Yence

Lamentable
laugh
learned (adj.)
legislative
legislature

Yacht yes yet yonder youths

Zoology

[blocks in formation]

1. COME, let us praise God, for He is exceeding'great; let us bless God, for He is very good.

2. He made all things; the sun to rule the day, the moon to shine by night.

3. He made the great whale,' and the elephant,' and the little worm that crawleth on the ground.

4. The little birds sing praises to God when they war ble sweetly in the green shade.

5. The brooks and rivers praise God, when they murmur' with melody amongst the smooth pebbles.”

6. I will praise God with my voice ; for I may praise Him though I am but a little child.

831

7. A few years ago, and I was a little infant, and my tongue was dumb within my mouth.

8. And I did not know the great name of God, for my reason was not come unto me.

9. But now I can speak, and my tongue shall praise Him; I can think of all His kindness, and my heart shall love Him.

10. Let Him call me, and I will come unto Him; let Him command, and I will obey Him.

11. When I am older, I will praise Him better; and I will never forget God, so long as my life remaineth in me.

1 EXCEEDING. Very, exceedingly.
2 WHALE. The largest animal living

in water.
8 ELEPHANT. The largest land animal.
4 WARBLE. To sing as birds do.

6 MURMUR. To make a low, contin

ued sound, as a running brook.
O MELODY. Sweetness of sound, music.
7 PEBBLES. Small, roundish stones.
8 DUMB, 1 Not able to speak.

II. - THE SHEEP AND THE BIRDS.

a-lärmed
ought (awt) +

crēat'ạres / câught (kawt) An'swered (-serd) com' fort-a-ble troŭb'led 03 hătch'et

yes'ter-day al 1. A FATHER and his son were once sitting under a tree upon a hill. It was near sunset, and a flock of sheep were feeding near them. A strange' man came by, who had a dog with him. As soon as the sheep saw the dog, they became alarmed,' and ran into some thorny bushes which grew near by. Some of their wool caught upon the thorns, and was torn off.

2. When the boy saw this, he was troubled,' and said, “ See, father, how the thorns tear away the wool from

the poor sheep. These bushes ought to be cut down, so that hereafter they may not harm the sheep.” His father was silent a while, and then said, “So you think the bushes ought to be cut down ?“Yes," answered his son,

66 and I wish I had a hatchet to do it with.” The father made no reply, and they went home.

3. The next day they came to the same place with a hatchet. The boy was full of joy, and very eager to have his father begin to cut down the bushes. They sat down upon the hill, and the father said, “ Do you hear how sweetly the birds sing? Are they not beautiful creatures ?” “0, yes,” replied the boy; "the birds are the most beautiful of all creatures."

4. As they were speaking, a bird flew down among the bushes, and picked off a tuft* of wool, and carried it away to a high tree. See,” said the father, “ with this wool the bird makes a soft bed for its young in the nest. How comfortables the little things will be ! and the sheep could well spare a little of their fleece. Do you now think it well to cut down the bushes?“No," said the boy; “we will let them stand.”

5. “My dear son," said the father, “the ways of God are not always easy to understand. It seemed to you very hard, yesterday, that the poor sheep should loso their wool; but to-day you see that without this wool the little bird could not have made its warm nest. So, many things happen to us which seem hard; but God ordains' them for our good, and they are meant in kindness and love."

1 STRANGE. Unknown.
2 ALARMED. Frightened, scared.
8 TROUBLED. Disturbed, vexed.
* TUFT. A collection, as thread, hair,

or feathers in a bunch.

5 COMFORTABLE. In a state of com

fort, free from distress or uneast.

ness, at ease. 6 UNDERSTAND. Comprehend, know. 7 ORDAINS. Appoints, decrees.

« AnteriorContinuar »