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age that the judge and the lawyers must find out, by asking questions, whether he or she understands the meaning of an oath. The judge decides by the answers whetlier the witness shall be received or not.

5. Once, at a trial in the State of New York, a little girl, nine years of age, was offered as a witness against a prisoner who was on trial for a crime committed in her father's house.

6. “ Now, Emily,” said the counsel for the prisoner, “I want to know if you understand the nature of an oath.”

7. I don't know what you mean," was the simple

answer.

8. “ There, your honor," said the counsel, addressing the judge," it is obvious that this witness must be rejected, because she does not comprehend the nature of an oath.”

9. “Let me see,” said the judge. “Come here, my daughter."

10. Assured 4 by the kind manner and tone of the judge, the child stepped forward to him, looking confidingly in his face, with a calm, clear eye, and in a manner so artless and frank that it went straight to the heart.

11. “ Did you ever take an oath ?” inquired the judge.

12. The little child stepped back with a look of horror, and, blushing deeply, answered, “No, sir.” She thought he meant to ask if she had ever used profane language.

13. “I do not mean that,” said the judge, who saw ber mistake ; “I mean, were you ever a witness be. fore?"

14. “ No, sir; I never was in court before, the answer.

15. He handed her the Bible open.
16. “Do you know that book, my daughter ?

17. She looked at it, and answered, “ Yes, sir; it is the Bible."

18. “Do you ever read it ?” he asked. 19. “ Yes, sir, every evening.”

20. “Can you tell me what the Bible is ?" inquired the judge.

21. “It is the word of the great God," she answered.

22. “Well, place your hand upon this Bible, and listen to what I say;” and he repeated slowly the oath usually administered' to witnesses.

23. “Now," said the judge, “you have been sworn as a witness. Will you tell me what will befall you

if you do not tell the truth?”

24. “I shall be shut up in the state prison,” answered the child.

25. “ Any thing else ?” asked the judge.
26. “I shall never go to heaven,” she replied.

27. “How do you know this?” asked the judge again.

28. The child took the Bible, and turning rapidly to the chapter containing the Commandments, pointed to the injunction, “ Thou shalt not bear false witaess against thy neighbor ;” adding, “I learned that before I could read.”

29. “Has any one talked to you about your being a witness in court against this man?” inquired the judge.

30. “ Yes, sir,” she replied ;“my mother heard they wanted me to be a witness, and last night she called me

10

to her room, and asked me to tell her the Ten Commandments; and then we knelt down together, and she prayed that I might understand how wicked it was to bear false witness against my neighbor, and that God would help me, a little child, to tell the truth as it was before him. And when I came up here with mother, she kissed me, and told me to remember the Ninth Commandment, and that God would hear every word that I said.”

31. “Do you believe this?” asked the judge, whilo a tear glistened in his eye, and his lip quiveredo with emotion."

32. “Yes, sir,” said the child, with a voice and manner that showed her conviction" of its truth was perfect.

33. “God bless you, my child,” said the judge ; "you have a good mother. This witness is competent," 12 he continued. “ Were I on trial for my life, and innocent of the charges against me, I would pray God for such witnesses as this. Let her be examined.”

34. She told her story in a simple way, but with a directness that made every body who heard her believe that she was telling the truth. The lawyers on both sides asked her many questions, but she never varied from the statement she had first made. Some of the witnesses for the prisoner had sworn falsely, but the truth of the little girl prevailed against their untruth. The jury helieved her, and the prisoner was convicted" mainly on the strength of what she testified.

I OFFENCE. Misdeed.

T ADMINISTERED. Given or tendered 2 PRESIDES. Has charge of.

8 GLISTENE.D. Shone or glittered. 8 OBVIOUS. Plain.

9 QUIVERED. Moved tremulously. 4 ASSURED. Made confident.

10 EMOTION. Feeling. HORROR, Extreme terror.

11 CONVICTION. Belief. * PROFANE. Irreverent to sacred per- 12 COMPETENT. Qualified or suitable Bons or things, impious.

18 CONVICTED. Declared guilty.

VI. - THE LORD'S PRAYER.

ROBERT BLAIR.

fä'ther

grāte'fûl ū-ni-vër'sal lhbm'age hăl'lowed 3 rę-sīgned'; be-neath' con-těnt'ęd

for-giv'en (for-biva!
guard
temp-tā'tion
e-tër'ni-ty

1. FATHER of all, we bow to thee,

Who dwell'st in heaven adored,
But present still through all thy works,

The universal' Lord.

2. Forever hallowed be thy name

By all beneath the skies;
And may thy kingdom still advance,

Till grace to glory rise.

3. A grateful homage may we yield,

With hearts resigned to thee; And as in heaven thy will is done,

On earth so let it be.

4. From day to day we humbly own

The hand that feeds us still;
Give us our bread, and teach to rest

Contented in thy will.

6. Our sins before thee we confess;

O, may they be forgiven!
As we to others mercy show,

We mercy beg from Heaven.

6. Still let thy grace our life direct,

From evil guard our way,
And in temptation's fatal path

Permit us not to stray.

7. For thine the power, the kingdom thine ;

All glory's due to thee :
Thine from eternity they were,

And thine shall ever be.

UNIVERSAL. Of or comprising all. JIALLOWED. Holy, sacred. HOMAGE. Reyerence, worship.

4 RESIGNED. Yielded, given up.
5 POWER. Ability, might.
6 ETERNITY. Endless duration.

VII. – THE THEFT OF THE GOLDEN EAGLE.

in-hăb'it-ants
en-jöğ'ıng
în-ter-răpt'ęd
piērç'ing

vil'lạ-đẹry
ex-clāim'ing
hŭr'ry-ing
ey'ry (dr'ę or t're)

vìş'ı-ble 1 wring'ing bạp-tized' i prèç'i-pïçe

1. The golden eagle is a bird of prey, and it is found in the British Islands, and in the lofty and barren cliffs of the Orkney Islands, which lie on the north of Scotland.

2. One of these birds was once the cause of great distress and terror to the inhabitants of a village there. The villagers had gone out, one summer day, to the hay fields. About one o'clock they left their labor, to rest, and to eat the food they had brought with them. While they were enjoying themselves in this quiet way, the peaceful, happy scene was suddenly interrupted' by a

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