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S E R M 0 N XXIV.
Opens the Enemies second and third Preparatives for the

Death of Christ, by their illegal Trial and Condemna.

tion.
Luke xxiii. 23, 24.

“ And they were inkant with loud voices,
requiring that he might be crucified,” &c.

S E R M N XXV.
Remarks a memorable Passage of Christ, in his Way to the

Place of his Execution.
Luke xxiii. 27, 28, &c. “And there followed him a great

company of people, and of women, which also be wailed
“ and lamented him. But Jesus turning upto them, said,

Daughters of Jerusalem weep not for me, but weep for
“ yourselves, and for your children,"

332
S E R Μ Ο Ν XXVI,
Opens the Nature and Quality of the Death Christ died

upon the Cross.
A As ii. 23. “ Him being delivered by the determinate counsel

“ and fore knowledge of God, ye have taken, and by wicked
“ hands have crucified and Nain,”

345
S E R M ON XXVII,
Opeos and improves that signal Providence, which direct-

ed aod ordered the Title affixed to the Cross of Christ.
Luke xxiii 38. And a Superscription also was written over

" him in letters of Greek, and Latin, and Hebrew; This is
" the King of the Jews,

359
S E R M ON XXVIII.
Opens the Manner of Christ's Death, in respect of the soli-

tariness thereof.
Zech. xiii. 7. “Awake, o sword, against my shepherd, and a-

gainst the man that is my fellow, saith the Lord of hosts;
“ smite the shepherd, and the sheep shall be scattered ; and
" I will turn mine hand upon the little ones,"

370
S E R M ON XXIX.
Opens the Manner of Christ's Death, in relpect of the Pa-

tience thereof.
Ifa. liü. 7. “ He was oppressed, and he was afilicted, yet he o-

pened not his mouth: he is brought as a lamb to the

Naughter, and as a sheep before her shearers is dumb, so
“ lie opened not his mouth,"

384
SERMO N XXX.
Opens the Instructiveness of the Death of Christ, in bis

seven laft Words ; the first of which is here opened.
Luke xxiii. 34. “Then faid Jesus, Father, forgive them, for
they know not what they do,

397

Pag.

SE R M 0 N XXXI.
Opens the second excellent Word of Christ upon the Cross.
John xix. 27. " Then saith he to his disciple, Behold thy mo-

" ther,"

412

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S E R M 0 N XXXII.
Opens the third of Christ's laft Words upon the Cross.
Luke xxiii.

43.

“ And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto
“ thes, to day shalt thou be with me in paradise,' 423

S E R M Ο Ν XXXIII.
Opens the fourth excellent Saying of Christ upon the Cross.
Matth, xxvii. 46. “ And about the ninth hour, Jesus cried with

a loud voice, saying, Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani ; that
" is to say, My God, my God, why haft thou forsaken me?” 438
S E R M

XXXIV,
Opens the fifth excellent Saying of Christ upon the Crofs.
John xix. 28. “ After this, Jesus knowing all things were now

accomplished, that the scripture might be fulfilled, faith,
" I thirst,"

451
S E R M ON XXXV.
Opens the fixth excellent Saying of Christ upon the Cross.
John xix. 30. “When Jesus therefore had received the vine-
“ gar, he said, [It is finished); and he bowed his head, and
gave up the ghoft,"

.464
S E R M o N XXXVI.
Opens the seventh and last Word with which Christ breath

ed out his Soul.
Luke xxiii. 46. And when Jesus had cried with a loud voice,

“ he said, Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit ;
“ and having said thus, he gave up the ghost,"

S E R M 0 N XXXVII.
Treats of Christ's Funeral, opening the Manner, Reasons,

aod excellent Eads thereof.
John xix. 40, 41, 42. “ Then took they the body of Jesus,
“ and wound it in linen cloaths, with the spices, as the inan-
ner of the Jews is to bury,” (sc.

489

476

ADVERTISEMENT by the PUBLISHER.

In this Edition, all the Greek and Latin Notes, which were either Illustrations of the Text or contained instructive Matter, are, for the sake of those that are not acquainted with the Greek and Latin Languages, Translated; except those which the Author himself had Englished in the Text, where his Traflations is marked with " inverted Commas,

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T

HOSE of the name of Flavel derive their pedigree from

one who was the third great Officer that came over with

William the Conqueror ; but this worthy Divine was far from that weakness and vanity to boast of any thing of that nature; being of the Poet's mind, who said,

Et genus, et proavos, et quae non fecimus ipsi,

Vix ea noftra vocoHis father was Mr. Richard Flavel, a painful and eminerit minister. He was first minister at Broomsgrove in Worcestershire, then ag Hafler, and removed from thence to Willerley in Gloucestershire, where he continued till 1600, whence he was outed upon the restoration of king Charles II, because it was a sequestred living, and the Incumbent then alive: This did not so much affect Mr. Flavel, as that he wanted a fixed place for the exercise of his pastoral function. He was a person of such extraordinary piety, that those who conversed with him, said, They never heard one vain word drop from his mouth. A little before the turning out of the Nonconformist ministers, being near Totness in Devon, he preached from Hofea vii. 6. The days of visitation are come, the days of recompence are come, Ifrael fall know it. His application was so close, that it offended fome people, and occasion. ed his being carried before some Justices of the Peace; but they could not reach him, so that he was discharged. He afterwards quitted that country, and his son's house, which was his retiring place, and came to London, where he continued in a faithful and acceptable discharge of his office, till the time of the dreadful plague in 1665, that he was taken and imprisoned in the mapaer following. He was at Mr. Blake's house in CoventGarden, where some people had met privately for worship: whilft Voir l..

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he was at prayer, a party of foldiers brake in upon them, with their swords drawn and demanded their preacher, threatning fome, and flattering others to discover him, but in vain. Some of the compädy threw a coloured cloak over him, and in this disguise he was, together with his hearers, carried to Whitehall ; the women were dismissed, but the men detained, and forced to ly all that night upou the bare foor'; and, because they would

five pounds each, were sent to Newgate, where the peftilence raged most violently, as in other places of the city. Here Mr. Flavel and his wife were shut up, and seized with the ficknets: They were bailed out, but died of the contagion; of which their son John had a divine monition given him

by a dream, as we shall observe in its proper place. Mr. Richard Flavel left two sons behind him, both ministers of the gospel, viz. John and Phineas.

John the eldest was born in Worcestershire. It was observ. able, that whilst his mother lay-in with him, a nightingale made her nest in the out-side of the chamber-window, where the used to sing most sweetly. He was religiously educated by his father, and having profited well at the grammar schools, was fent early to Oxford, and settled a commoner in Univerfity. College. He plied his studies hard, and exceeded many of his contemporaries in university learning.

Soon after his commencing batchelor of arts, Mr. Walplate, the minister of Diptford in the county of Devon, was rendred uncapable of performing his office by reason of his age and infirmity, and sent to Oxford for an affiftant; Mr. Flavel, tho' but young, was recommended to him as a perfon duly qualified, and was accordingly settled there by the standing com. mittee of Devon, April 27, 1650, to preach as a probationer and assistant to Mr. Walplate.

Mr. Flavel considered the weight of his charge, applied himself to the work of his calling with great diligence; and being affiduous in reading, meditation and prayer, he increased in ministerial knowledge daily, (for he found himself that he came raw enough in that respect from the university) so that he attained to an high degree of eminency and reputation for his aseful labours in the church.

About six months after his fettling at Diptford, he heard of an ordination to be at Salisbury, and therefore went thither with his testimonials, and offered himself to be examined and ordained by the presbytery there: They appointed him a text, upon which he preached to their general fatisfaction ; aud have ing afterwards examined in as to his learning, &c. they set

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