Imágenes de páginas
PDF

pray, that, an effectual door may speedily be opened among them for the entrance of that Gospel which is life and peace!

SOUTH AFRICA.

Our Readers will have noticed, in the Report just published, that mention is made of a contribution of 20l. from a Baptist church at Graham's Town, South Africa. A letter has lately been received from Mr. Duxbury, the pastor of that church, containing some interesting particulars respecting its state and prospects. After acknowledging, in grateful terms, the receipt of some books for their Sunday School, he remarks—

“Our Sabbath School, on the whole, prospers : the children, who are all of English parents, improve in reading and in singing; and, considering the heathenish state of the Colony, it is pleasing to hear their infant voices lifted to proclaim the glories of God and the Lamb, in songs of praise. I hope the children make progress in knowledge; we endeavour to instill into their minds the important truths of revealed religion, and as the seed of divine truth is sown among them, I hope it will spring up, in some thirty, in some sixty, and in some an hundred sold. New-year's day, was held the anniversary of the School, when the children repeated portions of Scripture, and Young's Night Thoughts. They were afterwards treated with dinner and tea. About 100 children, besides a number of friends, Partook with them of the repast, among whom were two Missionaries of the London Society, and two of the Wesleyan missionaries. . One of the latter gave the children an exhortation. You will doubtless feel desirous of information respecting the church here. We are not without our little trials and discouragements, and yet we are not without proofs of the divine approbation. Our chapel is well attended, and we have lately had an increase of six, who had been members before of Baptist churches; part of the six having recently come from England; and on Christmas eve we had six added to us by Baptism. It was a pleasing sight, and excited considerable interest in the town. I have the pleasure to inform you that four others are iooking forward to the enjoyment of gospel ordinances and church fellowship.” I hope

you received the £20 which was directed to your care for the use of the Baptist Missionary Society. The sum was but small, but if you knew all the difficulties we have had to grapple with, you would think it very handsome. Besides this, we have made two collections for the London Missionary Society; one to assist in a mission to the poorest and most degraded of all the African tribes, namely, the Bushmen; the other to aid in building a chapel at Algoa bay, for the use of the Hottentots residing there. The state of religion here, all things considered, is as well as might be expected, The Wesleyans have a large chapel, and are pretty well attended. They have also three chapels in the country, within about 30 miles of Graham's Town, and another building at Somerset, about 90 or 100 miles from this place. They intend to erect a chapel at Port Francis, between 30 and 40 miles off; they have also three Missionary stations among the Caffres; one particularly under the ministry of a Mr. Shaw in a very flourishing state. Our In dependent friends are endeavouring to raise a cause in Graham's Town; they have a chapel in part built, and preaching in a schoo room by one of the missionaries under the patronage of the London Society. There is a large church building here also, which is so far finished as to be covered in, and when completed, will I suppose seat from 1500 to 1800, so that the inhabitants will not have to complain of the want of means in this town. Think, my dear Sir, of our situation, far removed from British churches, placed alone, the only church of our denomination on a vast continent, surrounded by numerous savage heathen tribes, and living amongst nominal Christians of our own country; say my dear friend, if we do not need the notice and sympathy of our brethren, yet we are not cast down, we are persuaded that the Lord has established a church here, against which the gates of hell shall not prevail.”

HOME PROCEEDINGS.

SOUTH DEVON.

THE Friends of the Mission in this district have had the pleasure of receiving at their meetings this year, as a deputation from the Parent Society, the Secretary and Dr. Steadman. The visit of these, their highly-esteemed brethren, was rendered additionally interesting to many Christian friends, by the recollection of intercourse for.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]

Contributions received on account of the Baptist Missionary Society, from August 20 to September 20, 1827, not including individual

Subscriptions.

FOR THE MISSION. £ s. d. Legacy of the Rev. Samuel Bull, late of Bassingbourn, Cambridgeshire.... 10 0 0

Legacy of Mrs. Mary Ostle, late of Toll Square, near North Shields, by Mr.
Wm. Ostle, Executor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . 19 19 0
North of England Auxiliary, Houghton-le-Spring, by Rev. R. Pengilly.... G 7 (2
Boxmoor, Collected by Mrs. Pearce................. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 0 0
Shrewsbury, Collection after Sermons by Messrs. Carey and Statham........ 15 10 0
Gloucester, Collected by Miss Rees........... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 8 0
Loughton, Collection after a Sermon by Rev. E. Carey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 0 0

Fakenham, Baptist Congregation, by Rev. Mr. Thompson (Sabbath School
4s. 7d.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 6 11
Guilsborough, Collection, by Rev. W. Gray.................. . . . . . . . . . . 7 12 0.
Tewkesbury, (including Translations, 51. 3s. ; Female Schools, 171. 17s.6d.) 61 12 6
Scarborough Auxiliary Society, by Mr. C. Hill, Treasurer................ 75 12 4
Plymouth, on account, ........by Wm. Prance, Esq. Treasurer .......... 28 0 0
Mr. Richard Sinnock, Battle, ... by Rev. J. Ivimey ..............Donation 20 0 0
J. G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . by the Secretary................ Do. 10 10 0
Friend to Missions .......... by Rev. W. Gray .............. Do. 5 0 0
Thos. Adderley, Esq. Great Surrey-street, by Rev. James Upton... Do. 1 1 0
“Jethro' M. H. (Native Schools) by the Secretary.............. Do. 1 1 0
A Seafaring Friend . . . . . . . . . . . . by Ditto.................... Do. 1 0 0

WIDOW AND ORPHANS” FUND.
W. B. Gurney, Esq. Muswell Hill............................Donation 25 0 0
Collected by the Rev. James Coultart, towards a Female School in Kingston, Jamaica.

Bristol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............... 190 7 0 Abergavenny . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 10 0 0 Brecon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 0 9 Carmarthen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................. 8 0 0 Narbeth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 17 9 £ s. d. Tenby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 0 0 Pembroke Dock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 10 0 Milford Haven . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - . . . . . . I 5 6 Haverfordwest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 10 0 Middle Mill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - . 2 1 0 Fishguard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 2 6 6 Newport, Pembroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 5 9 Nailsworth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 0 ° Miss Whitchurch and Friend, Salisbury ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 0 ° Joseph Fletcher, Esq. and Mrs. Fletcher, Bruce Grove ................ 10 10 0 Mr. and Misses Stennett, London . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 12 6 - Since received. Ladies' Society for the Instruction of Negro Children, by Miss E. F. Maitland, Secretary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 0 0 Miss Smith, Olney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 0

[graphic]

TO CORRESPONDENTS.

Parcels of Books and Pamphlets have been received from the Rev. T. King, Bedford; and Mr. George Farr, Holborn.

In the List of Contributious last month, for Lincoln, 6l. 16s.7d. read Boston; and for Mrs. Holines, Hill Top, Warrington, read Mrs. Martha Hart, Hill Top, Latchford.

The name of the Rev. W. Yates, of Gloucester, should have appeared in the list of Life Subscribers appended to the Report just published, with the sum of 10l.

We have carefully examined the various Letters of our respected Correspondent from Hull, and find that the omission of 17 l. 2s. 3d. from the Juvenile Society, and of 8s. 6d. Widows' Mites, by Rev. J. M'Pherson, is owing to those sums never having been specified in the lists forwarded by him, though they are included in the general anount of receipts. The Subscription of 21, 2s. from Beverley was paid through another channel; the “Poor Woman's Mite” is precisely as it stands in his own list.

Our Friends generally will be aware, that in transcribing for the press such a number of proper names and figures, errors will probably occur, notwithstanding the utmost care to prevent them. Should any be discovered of sufficient importance to require notice, the Editor will be happy to correct them. He takes occasion further to remark, that the labour of the transcriber, and the chance of mistake, would be materially lessened, were all the Lists of Contributions made out in a plain and legible hand.

The generous proposal from J. W., Monmouthshire, shall be attentively considered. Reasons which would be perfectly satisfactory to the Friends who make it, prevent its being more publicly referred to at present.

Littlewood & Co., Printers, 15, Old Bailey.

Quarterly Japerg,

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][subsumed][graphic][graphic][graphic]

ChristiAN FRIENDs, It sometimes happens that, amidst the absurdities and i.i. which abound in the fabulous accounts of heathen gods, there are traditions, which evidently derived their origin, in a far distant age, from a nobler and purer source. A very remarkable instance of this kind is presented to your notice in the engraving on the first page, which is copied from paintings on the wall of an ancient pagoda or Hindoo temple. The picture is said to represent their god Krishnoo, in one of his various avatars, or incarnations. You perceive that in the first instance, in the figure on the left, he appears as a sufferer; his countenance is strongly marked with the expression of pain from the venomous bite of an enormous serpent, which seems to have bound him fast in its coils. In the second figure, he is seen, exulting and joyful, as a crowned Conqueror treading on the head of the serpent from the power of which he has been delivered. It cannot, surely, be doubted, that these figures must have originally been intended to preserve the memory of the first gracious promise to fallen man, given in the form of a curse denounced on the serpent. I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed: it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel. This memorable declaration may justly be considered as the corner stone of patriarchal faith. It was well understood by those ancient saints, who called upon the name of the Lord before and after the flood, as pointing, to a future great Deliverer, in the faith of whom they might live and die in a state of reconciliation with God, and in the assurance of salvation from all the evils which the serpent and the fall had brought upon them. Writing was not then invented—figures or hieroglyphics, as they are called, were the only methods, besides personal conversation, of communicating ideas; and therefore we may conclude that sculpture or painting was used in order to keep up, from generation to generation, the memory of this inestimable [...". and that thus i. of this ind were first of all brought into use. You will not fail to remark, Christian friends, how strikingly these traditions of a distant nation, inhabiting the very part of the world which was first peopled by Noah and his immediate posterity, serve to confirm and enliven our faith in the Holy Scriptures. And surely, when we see this interesting kind of evidence that the remote ancestors of the poor be. nighted Hindoos, were acquainted with

him.

the same great fundamental truths of the fall and recovery of mankind which are now, in these later , so clearly set before us in the Gospel of Christ, it should animate our desires and quicken our endeavours to make known the glad tidings of salvation to them.

Our Missionary friend Mr. N. M. Ward, has lately sent home from Sumatra a curious document which throws some light on the nature of practical Mahommedanism, as it exists in those countries. This document consists of a translation of various inscriptions on a roll of charms, worn as a protection by a native ruffian who lately attempted to murder the Fiscal or Dutch Magistrate at Padang. In introducing the account of this outrage, Mr. Ward observes:—“The unity of God is the rallying point of the Mahommedans; their strong hold, and the weapon with which they combat all their enemies, yet we find their system and that of heathen idolatry in practice substantially the same. The idolatrous polytheist makes an image of some imaginary supernatural power, performs his devotions before it, propitiates it with offeri and looks to it for deliverance from his troubles and calamities. The Mahommedan unitarian entertains the utmost abhorrence of all images, and will not approach one without discovering his detestation by a visible sign, yet he makes a representation of a mark on the body of his prophet, inscribes it with the sacred name Mahommed, and invests it with the power of accomplishing all his desires, of pardonin o his sins, and of finally conducting him to heaven without account. It will be seen from the resent communication that these are not harmless play-things, mere notions, too absurd to *. seriously credited by those who make the unity of God the basis of their creed. On the contrary, they have a ". influence over the conduct, and become the source of numerous actions equally incompatible with the welfare of society and the personal happiness of their deluded votaries.” He then proceeds to relate the circumstance to which we have already referred: —“On the 23rd. December last, a Malay, called Malim Dubalong, was accused before the Fiscal of having robbed his i. a native of the Madras coast, to the amount of 1000 rupees. The party accused could not clear himself, ..". directed to find bail or to be sent to pri son. He was, however, suffered to return home, chiefly to seek a person to bai In the evening the plaintiff in

« AnteriorContinuar »