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" Ye nymphs of Solyma''! begin the song;

To heav'nly themes", sublimer strains belong." But if it should so happen that words which have so strict and intie mate a connexion, as not to bear even a momentary separation, are divided from one another by this cæsural pause, we then feel a sort of struggle between the sense and the sound, which renders it difficult to read such lines harmoniously. The rule of proper pronunciation in such

cases, is to regard only the pause which the sense fornis ; and to read the line accordingly. The neglect of the cæsural pause may make the line sound somewhat unharmoniously; but the effect would be much worse, if the sense were sacrificed to the sound. For instance, in the following line of Milton,

_“ What in me is dark, « Illumine; what is low, raise and support, the sense clearly dictates the pause after illumine, at the end of the third syllable, which, in reading, ought to be made accordingly; though if the melody only were to be regarded, illumine should be connected with what follows, and the pause not made till the fourth or sixth syllable. So in the following line of Pope's Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot,

“I sit, with sad civility I read," the ear plainly points out the cæsural pause as falling after sad, the fourth syllable. But it would be very bad reading to make any pause there, so as to separate sad and civilily. The sense admits of no other pause than after the second syllable sit, which therefore must be the only pause made in reading this part of the sentence.

There is another mode of dividing some verses, by introducing what may be called demi-cæsuras, which require very slight pauses; and which the reader should manage with judgment, or he will be apt to fall into an affected sing-song mode of pronouncing verses of this kind: The following lines exemplify the demi-cæsura.

* Warms in the sun", refreshes' in the breeze,
« Glows' in the stars”, and blossoms in the trees :
** Lives' through all life"' ; extends' through all extent;

"Spreads' undivided", operates unspent." Before the conclusion of this introduction, the Compiler takes the liberty to recommend to teachers, to exercise their pupils in discovering and explaining the emphatic words, and the proper tones and pauses, of every portion assigned them to read, previously to their being called out to the performance. These preparatory lessons, in which they should be regularly examined, will improve their judgment and taste; prevent the practice of reading without attention to the subject; and establish a habit of readily discovering the meaning, force, and beauty, of every sentence they peruse.

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CHAPTER VIII.-Public Speeches.

SÈC. 1. Cicero against Verres,

125

2. Speech of Adherbal to the Roman. Senate, imploring their

protection against Jugurtha,

128

3. The Apostle Paul's noble defence before Festus apd

Agrippa,

132

4. Lord Mansfield's speech in the House of Lords, 1770, on

SEC. 1. Earthquake at Calabria, in the year 1638,

141

2. Letter from Pliny to Geminius,

145

3. Letter from Pliny to Marcellinus, on the death of an ami-

able young woman,

ib.

4. On discretion,

147

5. On the government of our thoughts,

149

6. On the evils which flow from unrestrained passions, 151

7. On the proper state of our temper, with respect to one

another,

152

8. Excellence of the Holy Scriptures,

155

9. Reflections occasioned by a review of the blessings, pro-

nounced by Christ on his disciples, in his sermon on

the mount,

ib.

10. Schemes of life often illusory,

166

11. The pleasures of virtuous sensibility,

159

12. On the true honor of man,

161

13. The influence of devotion on the happiness of life, 162

14. The planetary and terrestrial worlds comparatively con-

sidered,

164

15. On the power of custom, and the uses to which it may be

applied,

166

16. The pleasures resulting from a proper use of our facul-

ties,

168

17. Description of candour,

169

18. On the imperfection of that happiness which rests solely

on worldly pleasures,

170

19. What are the real and solid enjoyments of human life, 173

20. Scale of beings,

175

21. Trust in the care of Providence recommended,

178

22. Piety and gratitude enliven prosperity,

179

23. Virtue, when deeply rooted, is not subject to the influence

of fortune,

181

24. The speech of Fabricius, a Roman ambassador, to king

Pyrrhus, who attempted to bribe him to his interests,

by the offer of a great sum of money,

183

25. Character of James I. king of England,

ib.

26. Charles V. emperor of Germany, resigns his dominions,

and retires from the world,

184

27. The same subject continued,

187

PART II.

PIECES IN POETRY.

CHAPTER II.-Narrative Pieces.

Sec. 1. The bears and the bees,

2. The nightingale and the glow-worm,

3. The trials of virtue,

4. The youth and the philosopher,

5. Discourse between Adam and Eve, retiring to rest,

6. Religion and death,

202

203

204

205

207

209

CHAPTER III.- Didactic Pieces.

SEC. 1. The vanity of wealth,

211

2. Nothing formed in vain,

212

3. On pride,

ib.

4. Cruelty to brutes censured,

213

5. A paraphrase on the latter part of the 6th chapter of

Matthew,

214

6. The death of a good man a strong incentive to virtue, 215

216

7; Reflections on a future state, from a review of winter,

8. Adam's advice to Eve, to avoid temptation,

217

9. On procrastination,

218

10. That philosophy, which stops at secondary causes, re-

proved,

219

11. Indignant sentiments on national prejudices and hatred;

and on slavery,

220

CHAPTER IV.--Descriptive Pieces.

Sec. 1. The morning in summer,

2. Rural sounds, as well as rural sights, delightful,

3. The rose,

221

222

23

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