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hand which has lifted me up is about to cast me down—“ If he shall thus say, I have no delight in thee; behold, here am I, let him do to me as seemeth good unto him.”

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Dr. Mason's request was granted; and on Friday the 25th of May, he was released from his pastoral charge.

A CONTRAST

BETWEEN THE

DEATH OF A DEIST AND THE DEATH OF A CHRISTIAN:

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A CONTRAST,

ETC.

Letter from Adam Smith, LL.D. to William

Strahan, Esq., giving some account of Mr. Hume, during his last sickness.

Kirkaldy, Fife Shire, Nov. 9, 1776. Dear Sir,- It is with a real, though a very melancholy pleasure, that I sit down to give you some account of the behavior of our late excellent friend, Mr. Hume, during his last illness. Though, in his own judgment, his disease was mortal and incurable, yet he allowed himself to be prevailed upon, by the entreaty of his friends, to try what might be the effects of a long journey. A few days before he set out, he wrote that account of his own life, which, together with his other papers, he left to your care. My account, therefore, shall begin where his ends.

He set out for London towards the end of April, and at Morpeth met with Mr. John Home and myself, who had both come down from London on purpose to see him, expecting to have found him at Edinburgh. Mr. Home returned with him, and attended him during the whole of his stay in England, with that care and attention which might be expected from a temper so perfectly friendly and affectionate. As I had written to my mother that she might expect me in Scotland, I was under the necessity of continuing my journey. His disease seemed to yield to exercise and change of air ; and when he arrived in London, he was apparently in much better health than when he left Edinburgh. He was advised to go to Bath to drink the waters, which appeared for some time to have so good an effect upon him, that even he himself began to entertain, what he was not apt to do, a better opinion of his own health. His symptoms, however, soon returned with their usual violence; and from that moment he gave up all thoughts of recovery, but submitted with the utmost cheerfulness, and the most perfect complacency and resignation. Upon his return to Edinburgh, though he found himself much weaker, yet his cheerfulness never abated, and he continued to divert himself, as usual, with correcting his own works for a new edition, with reading books of amusement, with the conversation of his friends ;

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