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a time did he bring this text to my mind, Lackedst thou any thing? I was constrained with gratitude to reply, Nothing, Lord : Chrise is a most precious Master to serve ! I have proved it.”

During his connection with Mr. Wesley, though he in a great measure perceived the insufficiency of his own righteousness to justify him before God (for in the diary before alluded to, he expresses himself thus, “I would as soon attempt to swim by the help of a mill-stone, 'as to rely on my own works for salvation"); yet the doctrine which he had been taught to believe to be scriptura!, that a person may be one day high in the favor of God, and the next, an object of the divine vengeance, would often make him miserable. One night returning from Mr. Wesley's chapel, under great dejection of mind, fearing he should not be faithful to grace received, and so make shipwreck of faith, and finally perish; these words were immediately suggested to his mind: “If when we were enemies we were reconciled to God, by the death of his Son, much more being reconciled we shall be saved by his life.” His fears instantly subsided, his conscience felt a calm, to which before it was a stranger, and his mind was made happy in the belief of the truth.

In his next interview with Mr. Wesley, he hinted at the doctrine of the saints' final perseverance; upon this Mr. Wesley asked, " Where have you been to learn that?” He related the distress of his mind, together with the cause of it, and the means by which he had been relieved. As his understanding became more enlightened, he found this connection less desirable; he was less pleased with the Society, and they were not more satisfied with him: His attendance on ministers who preached the Calvinistic doctrines soon procured his dismission. · He now became personally acquainted with the Rev. Mr. Whitefield, was particularly intimate with the Rev. Mr. Jones, Chaplain of St. Saviour's, Southwark, and had the happiness to class among his dearest friends the Rev. Mr. Romaine, for whom, to the day of his death, he ever expressed the most sincere regard, having sat for many years under his ministry.

In the religious world he was well known as an author. Many of his productions have met with general acceptance. He had been frequently solicited to exercise himself in public preaching, which he as often declined, under the impression of his not being called to glorify God in that service. Though he could never be prevailed upon to comply with the solicitations of his friends in that particular, yet his talents were not laid up in a napkin; for since his death his family have found among his papers, letters from correspondents in England, Scotland, Ireland, and America, expressing the spiritual benefits they derived from his publications,

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ng several small pieces for children, (A plaint ended by the Rev. Mr. Jones; A Catechism; The His. US; A Precious Testimony of Jesus, in the Experience of dren, one ten, the other twelve Years of age), he entered

that work which will long live in the remembrance of those who ave read it; two volumes entitled, “A Spiritual Treasury for the Children of God, consisting of a Meditation for each Day in the Year, upon select Texts of Scripture:" The first volume for morning, the second for evening. Never did a miser arise with greater avidity from his bed, to accumulate wealth, than he did to compose these medita. tions. Hence, while others were indulging themselves in sleep, he would be up in the morning, in the depth of winter, at four o'clock, would sịt in his room without a fire, and has declared, that his mind was so intent on the glorious and animating truths, on which he was writing, that he felt no cold.

While executing this work, a gentleman waited upon him on bușiness. Instead of taking his name and address as desired, and as he thought he had done, he wrote the chapter and verse on which he had been meditating, and when he came afterwards to look at the paper in order to wait upon the gentleman, he found nothing upon it but Açte the second, verse the eighth; so much was his mind absorbed in divine things. He has frequently mentioned the many happy seasons he enjoyed when writing his Treasury, and he lived to know that his labour was not in vain in the Lord.

As he professed himself a member of the established church, and constantly attended her worship, he felt a concern that many, who had written on the Lord's Supper, had advanced doctrines which were in direct opposition to those maintained and taught in her Ar

He first appeared as a writer, in a pamphlet under the title of “Morality nat Christianity; or remarks on a very extraordinary Sermon, preached at St. George's, Southwark, by the Rev. Mr. Wingfield, Curate of said parish; in a letter to that Gentleman, by a Layman of the Church of England.”

In the year 1754, he published somePlain Queries, humbly offered to the Clergy, with an expostulatory address to the Laity of the Church of England, on the Declension of scriptural Christianity.”

He wrote, in the year 1758, “ Remarks and Observations on the Morality and Divinity contained in Dr. Free's Certain Articles, proposed to the Court of Assistants of the worshipful company of Salters, in a letter to the Rev. Dr. Free.” The motto in the title-page is, “ AS FREE, and not using your liberty as a cloak of maliciousness,” i Peter ïi. 16. He evidences in these pieces, a knowledge of his subject, an acquaintance with the scriptures, and a concern for the glory of Godo Though he much disapproved of the Armenian doctrines of free will, justification by works, universal redemption, &c. yet was he no less an enemy to the licentious tenets of the Antinomians; and, at the time when Mr. Relly disturbed the peace of the church, by his unscriptural preaching, and his Treatise of Union, he nobly appeared to de. fend that truth, “which is according to godliness," and printed a pamphlet under this title, “ Antinomian Heresy Exploded, in an Appeal to the Christian World, against the Unscriptural Doctrines, and Licentious Tenets, of Mr. James Relly, advanced in his Treatise of Union.” :

In a pamphlet which he published under the title, “ Methodism dia played, and Enthusiasm detected; intended as an Antidote against the delusive principles and unscriptural Doctrines of a modern Set of seducing Preachers; and as a Defence of our regular and orthodox Clergy, from their unjust reflections; addressed to the Rev. Mr. Romaine, the Rev. Mr. Jones, &c.” he might truly adopt the language of St. Paul, “I caught you with guile.” Many eagerly bought it, who afterwards heartily repented of their purchase. A gentleman passing by a bookseller's shop, caught by the title-page, went in and bought it. In the evening, after the business of the day was over, he put it into the hand of his son, saying, he had purchased it as an an: : , tidote against that poisonous doctrine he had lately imbibed, and in. sisted upon his reading it, hoping it would prevent his running after a set of enthusiastic preachers. The son obeyed. While reading the first and second pages, the father frequently interrupted him by saying, Mind that: But proceeding a little farther, he soon perceived the design of the author; and altering his language, begged he would cast it behind the fire: the son replied, “Sir, I began to read it at your request, do suffer me to finish it.”

· As a farther proof of the vivacity of his disposition, one day reading Mr. Wesley's Christian Library, and observing in how many plac ces he had published the works of those who had maintained the doctrine of imputed righteousness, he immediately formed the design of making extracts, which he accordingly did, and sent them into the world, under the title of The Scripture Doctrine of Inputed Righteousness, asserted and maintained by the Rev. Mr. John Wesley, A.M. late Fellow of Lincoln College, Oxford.” This little piece was soon caught up. It quickly ran through the societies in London, and at length reached Ireland, where Mr. Wesley then was. One of his preachers coming to thank him for the very excellent piece he had lately published, on the doctrine of imputed righteousness, Mr, Wesley instantly started with amazement, and pronounced it a pious fraud; but the book being produced, and the contents read, he found in the last page, that the whole was declared to be taken from his Christian Library.

After publishing several small pieces for children, (A plain Sermon, recommended by the Rey. Mr. Jones; A Catechism; The His. tory of Jesus; A Precious Testimony of Jesus, in the Experience of two Children, one ten, the other twelve Years of age), he entered upon that work which will long live in the remembrance of those who have read it; two volumes entitled, “ A Spiritual Treasury for the Children of God, consisting of a Meditation for each Day in the Year, upon select Texts of Scripture:” The first volume for morning, the second for evening. Never did a miser arise with greater avidity from his bed, to accumulate wealth, than he did to compose these medita. tions. Hence, while others were indulging themselves in sleep, he would be up in the morning, in the depth of winter, at four o'clock, would sịt in his room without a fire, and has declared, that his mind was so intent on the glorious and animating truths, on which he was writing, that he felt no cold.

While executing this work, a gentleman waited upon him on bu, șiness. Instead of taking his name and address as desired, and as he thought he had done, he wrote the chapter and verse on which he had been meditating, and when he came afterwards to look at the paper in order to wait upon the gentleman, he found nothing upon it but Açte the second, verse the eighth; so much was his mind absorbed in divine things. He has frequently mentioned the many happy seasons he enjoyed when writing his Treasury, and he lived to know that his labour was not in vain in the Lord.

As he professed himself a member of the established church, and constantly attended her worship, he felt a concern that many, who had written on the Lord's Supper, had advanced doctrines which were in direct opposition to those maintained and taught in her Ar

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