Imágenes de páginas
PDF

JOHN HEYWOOD'S

COMPLETE SERIES OF

HOME LESSON BOOKS

for use in Public Elementary Schools,

IN SIX BOOKS CORRESPONDING TO THE SIX STANDARDS OF

THE NEW CODE. (1875.)

BOOK III. FOR STANDARD III.,
Containing Lessons in Holy Scripture, Moral Poetry, Transcriptiou,

Dictation, Arithmetic, Spelling, Grammar, and Geography,

BY

ALFONZO GARDINER,

HEAD MASTER OF THE OUTCOTE-BANK BOARD SCHOOL

(HUDDERSFIELD SCHOOL BOARD).

Author of “ Acoustics, Light, and Heat," "Magnetism and
Electricity,” “Electricity,” in Extra Subject Series, &c.
and joint Author of “Plane and Solid Geometry,"

“Science Manuals.”

MANCHESTER :
JOHN HEYWOOD, 141 AND 143, DEANSGATE.

EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT, 141, DEANSGATE.
LONDON : SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, & Co. ; J. C. Tacey,

ART. 28, NEW CODE (1875), STANDARD III.

READING.--To read with intelligence a short paragraph from a more

advanced Reading Book. WRITING.--A sentence slowly dictated once from the same book.

Copy-books to be shown (Small Hand, Capital Letters,

and Figures). ARITHMETIC.-Long Division and Compound Rules (Money). GRAMMAR.—To point out the Nouns, Verbs, and Adjectives. GEOGRAPHY.—Outlines of Geography of England, with special

knowledge of the country in which the school is situated.

NEW EDITION.

ANSWERS TO THE ARITHMETICAL EXAMPLES,

IN

JOHN HEYWOOD'S HOME LESSON BOOKS.

In Six Books corresponding to the Standards, 2d. each.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]

This Book continues the plan carried out in Standards I. and II., and the advice given there as to the preparation of new work applies equally here.

As a preparation for the “ Literature Examination” of Standards IV.-VI., a few explanations, to be learnt by the pupils, are introduced after Monday's Lessons.

It has been thought advisable to include the Pronoun in the Grammar for this Standard.

In Geography little more could be done, in some of the lessons, than give a skeleton, leaving the teacher to clothe it by means of oral lessons.

The Arithmetical Problems are in some cases beyond the scope of an ordinary third standard boy, without he has a little help ; but much may be done to prepare for this part of the examination by the constant working out of problems with the class on the blackboard. It will be frequently necessary for the teacher to indicate the chain of reasoning by which the answer to some of the problems is to be arrived at, so that the pupil may not hopelessly “ stick in the bog ” at night, when he will, as a general rule, have no one to refer to.

There is an immense difference between the Standards of the various Inspectors in the matter of Arithmetic as well as in Dictation. Out of the mass of problems which teachers have kindly sent for use in this work, many of the difficult ones-only fit for Pupil-teachershave been omitted, and some that have been retained considerably exceed the requirements of the Code as set forth in the "Instructions to Inspectors.” Boys will be all the better for being worked up to this high standard, but it should not be required for a pass.

The (*) indicates that the sum has been given by oze of H.M. Inspectors, in an examination.

HOME LESSONS.-STANDARD III.

FIRST WEEK,
Lesson 1.-Learn for Monday Morning.
ST. MATTHEW, Chapter XIII., Verses 3—5; OR ELSE LEARN —

YOUTHFUL ASPIRATIONS.
Deeper, deeper let us toill | Onward, onward niay we press

In the mines of know-ledge, Through the path of duty : Nature's wealth and learning's Virtue is true hap-pi-ness, spoila

Ex-cel-lences true beauty ; Win from school and col-lege : | Minds are of ce-les-tial6 birth : Delvewe there for richer gems | Make we then a heaven of

Than the stars of di-a-dems. I earth. Montgomery. Itoil, labour, work. 29poil, anything taken by force. 3delve, to dig. diadems, crowns. Bexcellence, great merit. 6 celestial, heavenly. Lesson 2.—Tuesday.-Geography. Write and Learn.

THE BRITISH ISLANDS. The United Kingdom consists of two large islands, called Great Britain and Ire'-land, and a great number of smaller ones.

Great Britain is the largest island in Europe, and consists of Scot'-land, or North Britain, in the north, and England and Wales in the south.

The smaller island is called Ireland. It is separated from England by the Irish Sea.

These islands are all situated in the Atlantic, towards the uorth-west of Europe, being separated from it by the North Sea and the English Channel. Their total area is about 122,000 square miles.

England is nearly as large as Scotland and Ireland together.

Lesson 3.–Wednesday Morning. Work these Sums.

(1.) If I divide one hundred thousand and fifty pounds among 39 men, how many pounds will each get? (Simple long div.)

(2.) 3,986,442 = 92.

(3.) John has 96 marbles, and James has 24 times as many. How many have they both ?

Write and Learn. adds............ does add, joins ere............... before adze............a cooper's axe e'er ... ... ... ...ever air ............ the atmosphere. Their ............one who inherits Ayr............ a town in Scotland |

Lesson 4.–Thursday.-Grammar. Learn and Write.

GRAMMAR is the science which teaches us about WORDS and SENTENCES.

IVords are made up of letters. In the English language there are twenty-six letters, divided into vowels and consonants.

The letters a, e, i, o, u are vowels; w and y are yowels when they do not begin a word or syllable.

All the other letters are consonants.

A syllable is a word, or part of a word, sounded by one single effort of the voice.

Every syllable must contain a vowel. Ex. 1. Put a line under the vowels : Thus, pan. Mary caught John. The pig grunts. The wind blows very strongly. Go and spin your top. Sugar is sweet.

*Ex. 2. Divide into syllables : Thus, ba-by. Chimney, servant, Africa. On entering school remember to remain silent. The talkative parrot whistled a merry tune. Lesson 5.-Friday Morning. Work these Sums. £ S. d. £ 8. d.

£ 8. d. (1) 9 7 6 (2) 46 8 2

(3) 14 4 4 14 8 2 13 12 7

78 0 6 83 6 10 40 0 0

262 17 3 4 0 11

9 8

9 0 6 6 5 9 3 2 6

178 6 9

Write and Learn. all .........every one, the whole assent......... to agree to awl .........a shoemaker's pricker ascent ...... the rise of a hill, ant ..........an insect.

the act of rising. aunt ......a relative

SEOOND WEEK.
Lesson 6,-Learn for Monday Morning.
ST. MATTHEW, Chapter XIII., Verses 6–9; OR ELSE LEARN-

THE EAGLE.
What is that, mother?

The eagle, boy,
Proudly ca-reer-inghis course of joy,
Firm in his own mountain vigouri re-ly-ing",
Breast-ing+ the dark storm, the red bolts de-fying ;6
His wing on the wind and his eye on the sun,
He swerves? not a hair, but bears onwards right on.
Boy, may the eagle's flight ever be thine,
Onward and upward, true to the line.

Doane. Icareering, moving quickly. 2vigour, strength. Brelying, having confidence. "breasting, meeting, and fighting against. bred bolt, lightning. defying, having no fear. 78werves, to turn aside. bears onward, goes forward.

« AnteriorContinuar »