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EDWARD, like young SAMUEL, was brought early to the temple of the LORD. He loved the service of the Most High; and although too young actively to join in his ordinances, or to communicate with his followers, the tenor of his conduct, while under the sacred roof, uniformly manifested that he had delight in good things. Such an attachment had he formed to the Ministers of God's holy Word, that his greatest happiness was to receive their kind and condescending ate tentions : and in their absence, one of his chief pleasures was, to turn over the leaves of a book composed of their engraved portraits, and to call them indivi. dually by name.

He loved to see the friends of his parents, whom he had been taught to reverence as, also, the friends of God. Whenever these crossed the hospitable threshold of his father, EDWARD was the first to place their chairs, and request them to sit down. On such occasions, he desisted from his innocent amusements whilst the company were present, eagerly devoured the conversation, and hid it in the secret treasures of his heart. And this was the more commendable, as the discourse generally took a spiritual direction, and but seldom turned on secular affairs.

This amiable child was designed for an early immortality. He became the subject of disease. His parents felt that the cup of trembling was their portion ;, and, though duly resigned to the will of God, they strove in the keenest agonies of parental affection to ward off the too correctly anticipated event. Their prayers for the continuance of his life were, how. ever, unavailing; and Almighty God appeared to give his approval to such sentiments only as expressed submission to his apprehended removal from our world.

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And this is not a solitary instance wherein God has seemed thus to intimate his divine intention. Many well-authenticated narratives are on record, which establish the opinion, that when God is about to take a child of his to himself, he, as it were, stops the mouth that prefers a petition for his recovery and continuance on earth.

Being related to the parents of little EDWARD, I conceived it a duty, in this heavy family affliction, to offer

my services. Thus being more constantly than others at the bed-side of this pious child, I may perhaps be better able to speak concerning him. For some days before his death, he appeared to have been disengaged from all earthly ties. He could look upon his mother without any other affection than that which was indicated by a placid smile, and did not display that eagerness for her perpetual presence which he had formerly evinced. The tearful eye of his dear father was met by a serene countenance, which seemed to say, “ I am no longer yours; I am going to a better country.” He was patient in affliction. It appeared to be no task to him, to take the nauseous draughts which medical skill had prescribed for him ; and he was found willing to undergo any operation without the least repining.

His most frequent posture was that of reclining on his back, when his eyes were often so intently fixed on the ceiling of the room, as though they pierced through material obstacles, and discerned the attendant angels ready to convey his happy soul to the mansions of eternal felicity. An incident illustrative of his predominant feeling must conclude this account. He manifested a desire for something to be given to him; one thing after another was presented, but all

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were rejected, until his Hymn-book being offered, he
pressed it with evident feelings of peculiar delight to
his little bosom, closed his eyes with a heavenly
smile, and immediately expired.
To us that were spectators of this scene,

" 'Twas a solemn feast of feeling,
'Twas a sabbath of the mind.”.

MINISDEN.

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To the Editor of the Youth's Instructer. I HAVE thought that the following article may be not only acceptable but useful to many of your juvenike readers. It points out the dangers to which youth are exposed, and at the same time affords useful information on points connected with the formation of religious character. It is extracted from a popular work, entitled “ No Fiction," and is a Letter from a young man, who, having formerly tasted that the LORD is gracious, unhappily yielded to the attractions of evil company, and was led, by an easy gradation, to the commission of a crime so heinous, that, overwhelmed by despair, he enlisted into the army, and was sent to Canada; but on his passage, was induced to consider his ways, and brought again into the “ark of his peace.” Fearing his example might have had an unhappy effect upon a youth, for whose education he had pledged himself, he addressed to him the following Letter. MR. LEFEVRE TO JOHN GRAHAM.

The Gulf of St. Lawrence,

On board the 6MY DEAR YOUNG FRIEND, 66 The manner in which I parted from you in the

66

LEFEVRE'S LETTER.

17

streets of London, three months ago, has, on reflection, often given me distress. You must refer it, not to any unworthiness in you, or any variation of affection in me, but to strange disorder of body and mind, -disorder brought upon me by my own errors.

“In coming to my right mind, one of my first wishes was, that my past miscarriages might be beneficial to you. I now write to you, therefore, not merely to reassure you of my love, but to render my experience useful to the opening years of your life. And, if it shall, by the blessing of Him, who alone teaches us to profit, have this tendency, I shall not have suffered, even in relation to you, altogether in vain.

“ How interesting does your situation appear to me ;-young, eager, kind, and unsuspicious ; yet surrounded by the artful, the fascinating, and the wicked; exposed to trials under which many a lovely youth has fallen,-to trials under which I fell, though sustained by the profession of religion, and friendships peculiarly favourable to my preservation. My dear Joun, in such circumstances, caution becomes you. In your path, there are pit-falls so nicely concealed, that the eye of experience can hardly detect them; snares so bewitching, that they will rather allure your confidence, than ròuse you to circumspection.

“ Though I have been of assistance to you in your temporal prospects, I have criminally neglected your best interests. The pledge I gave to your excellent grandmother extended to a future as well as the present life; and this pledge I would now, though late, endeavour to redeem. I am sorry that I know not, at this time, the exact state of your mind, as it gives me a disadvantage in advising you. However, till I know more I shall content myself with making some

about you,

were rejected, until his Hymn-book being offered, he
pressed it with evident feelings of peculiar delight to
his little bosom, closed his eyes with a heavenly
smile, and immediately expired.
To us that were spectators of this scene,

“ 'Twas a solemn feast of feeling,
'Twas a sabbath of the mind."

MINISDEN.

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To the Editor of the Youth's Instructer. I AVE thought that the following article may be not only acceptable but useful to many of your juvenile readers. It points out the dangers to which youth are exposed, and at the same time affords useful information on points connected with the formation of religious character. It is extracted from a popular work, entitled “No Fiction,” and is a Letter from a young man, who, having formerly tasted that the Lord is gracious, unhappily yielded to the attractions of evil company, and was led, by an easy gradation, to the commission of a crime so heinous, that, overwhelmed by despair, he enlisted into the army, and was sent to Canada ; but on his passage, was induced to consider his ways, and brought again into the 6 ark of his peace.” Fearing his example might hay had an unhappy effect upon a youth, for whose edu! tion he had pledged himself, he addressed to him following Letter. MR. LEFEVRE TO JOHN GRAHAM.

The Gulf of St. Laws

On board 66 MY DEAR YOUNG FRIEND, 6. The manner in which I parted from

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