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CONTENTS.

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The Chain I

gave

53

Epitaph for Joseph Blackett, late Poet and

Shoemaker.

53

Farewell to Malta

53

To Dives. A Fragment

54

On Moore's last Operatic Farce, or Farcical

Opera

54

Epistle to a Friend, in answer to some

Lines exhorting the Author to be cheerful,

and to banish care'

54

Address, spoken at the opening of Drury-

Lane Theatre, Saturday, October 10, 1812 55

Verses found in a Summer-house at Hales-

Owen

Remember thee! Remember thee!

Parenthetical Address

To Time

Translation of a Romaic Love Song

Thou art not false, but thou art fickle

57

On being asked what was the Origin of

Love'

57

Remember him whom Passion's Power

57

Impromptu, in reply to a Friend

Sonnets to Genevra

From the Portuguese

From the French

Windsor Poetics

The Devil's Drive ; an unfinished Rhap-

sody

Stanzas for Music: I speak not, i trace

not, I breathe not thy name

59

To Lord Thurlow

To Thomas Moore. Written the evening

before his visit to Mr Leigh Hunt, in

Horsemonger Lane Gaol, May 19, 1813 - 60

Address intended to have been spoken at

the Caledonian Meeting, 1814

60

Condolatory Address to Sarah Countess of

Jersey

60

Fragment of an Epistle to Thomas Moore.

61

Elegiac Stanzas on the Death of Sir Peter

Parker, Bart,

62

To Belshazzar

62

Stanzas for Music: 'There be none of

Beauty's daughters'

62

Stanzas for Music: "There's not a joy the

world can give like that it takes away'. 62

Darkness

62

Monody on the Death the Right Hon. R.

B. Sheridan

Churchill's Grave

Prometheus

A Fragment

Sopnet to Lake Leman

A very Mournful Ballad on the Siege and

Conquest of Alhama

66

Stanzas for Music: "They say that hope is

happiness'

67

To Thomas Moore

67

58

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Farewell to the Muse

On finding a Fan

To an Oak at Newstead

To my Son

Farewell ! if ever fondest Prayer

Bright be the Place of thy Soul

When we Two parted

To a youthful Friend.

Lines inscribed upon a Cup formed from a

Skull

Well! thou art happy
Inscription on the Monument of a New-

foundland Dog
To a Lady, on being asked my Reason for

quitting England in the Spring
Remind me not, Remind me not
There was a Time, I need not name
And wilt thou weep when I am low?
Fill the Goblet again
Stanzas to a Lady on leaving England
Lines to Mr Hodgson. Written on board

the Lisbon Packet.

To Florence

Lines written in an Album, at Malta

Stanzas composed during a Thunderstorm

Stanzas written in passing the Ambracian

Gulf

The Spell is broke, the Charm is flown!

Written after swimining from Sestos to

Abydos

Lines written in the Travellers' Book at

Orchomenus
Maid of Athens, er we part
Translation of the Nurse's Dole in the

Medea of Euripides
My Epitaph
Substitute for an Epitaph
Lines written beneath a Picture
Translation of the famous Greek War Song
Translation of the Romaic Song
On Parting
On a Cornelian Heart which was broken
Lines to a Lady weeping

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OCCASIONAL PIECES-continued.

My soul is dark

78

To Samuel Rogers, Esq.

I saw Thee weep

79

On the Bust of Helen by Canova

Thy Days are done

79

Song for the Luddites

Saul

79

Versicles

Song of Saul before his last Battle

79

So, we'll go no more a Roring

*All is Vanity, saith the Preacher'

79

To Thomas Moore

67

When Coldness wraps this suffering Clay 80

To Mr Murray

68

Vision of Belshazzar

80

Epistle from Mr Murray to Dr Polidori 68 Sun of the Sleepless !

80

Epistle to Mr Murray

68 Were my Bosom as false as thou deem'st it

To Mr Murray

69

to be

80

On the Birth of John William Rizzo

Herod's Lament for Mariamne

81

Hoppner

On the Day of the Destruction of Jerusalem

Ode on Venice

69

by Titus

81

Translation from Vittorelli. On a Nun

71 By the Rivers of Babylon we sat down and

Stanzas to the Po

71

wept

81

Sonnet to George the Fourth, on the Repeal

The Destruction of Sennacherib

81

of Lord F.dward Fitzgerald's Forfeiture 71 A Spirit passed before me

82

Epigram. From the French of Rulhieres

72 | Poems ON NAPOLEON :

Stanzas

72

Ode to Napoleon

82

On my Wedding-Day

72

Ode from the French

83

Epitaph for William Pitt

72

.To Napoleon

Epigram

72

Stanzas

On the Star of 'The Legion of Honour'

73

Epigram

Napoleon's Farewell

73

The Charity Ball

73 Poems TO THYRZA:-

Epigram, on the Braziers' Company having

To Thyrza

86

resolved to present an Address to Queen

Away, away, ye Notes of Woe!

86

Caroline

73 One Struggle more, and I am free

Epigram on

Wedding - Day.

my

Euthanasia

Penelope

73 And thou art dead, as young and fair

On my thirty-third Birthday. January 22,

If sometimes in the Haunts of Men.

88

1821

73

Martial, Lib. I., Epig. I.

73

DOMESTIC PIECES :-

Bowles and Campbell

73

Fare thee well

Epigrams

73 A Sketch

Epitaph

73 Stanzas to Augusta : 'When all around

John Keats

73 grew drear and dark

90

The Conquest

74 Stanzas to Augusta : 'Though the day of

To Mr Murray

74 my destiny's over'

The Irish Avatar

74 Epistle to Augusta

Stanzas written on the road between

Endorsement to the Deed of Separation. In

Florence and Pisa

75

the April of 1816

92

Stanzas to a Hindoo Air

The Dream

92

Impromptu

Lines on hearing that Lady Byron was ill 94

To the Countess of Blessington

SATIRES :-

On Lord Thurlow's Poems

Stanzas for Music

ENGLISH BARDS AND SCOTCH REVIEWERS.

95

On this Day I complete my Thirty-Sixth

HINTS FROM HORACE

109

Year. Missolonghi, January 22, 1824.

THE CURSE OF MINERVA

119

The Waltz: An Apostrophic Hymn

122

HEBREW MELODIES :

THE VISION OF JUDGMENT .

126

She walks in Beauty

77

THE AGE OF BRONZE

137

The Harp the Monarch Minstrel swept 77 THE BLUES: A Literary Eclogue

144

lí that high World

77

The wild Gazelle

Childe HAROLD'S PILGRIMAGE: A Romaunt:- 150

Oh! weep for those

Canto the First

On Jordan's Banks

Canto the Second

163

Jephtha's Daughter

Canto the Third

175

Oh! snatch'd away in Beauty's Bloom

Canto the Fourth

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HOURS OF IDLENESS:

A SERIES OF POEMS, ORIGINAL AND TRANSLATED.

[FIRST PUBLISHED IN 1807.]

"Virginibus puerisque canto. -HORACE, lib. iii. Ode 1.
“Μήτ' άρ με μάλ' αίνεε, μήτε τι νείκει.'-HOMER, Iliad, x. 249.
“He whistled as he went, for want of thought.'-DRYDEN.

TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE

FREDERICK, EARL OF CARLISLE,

KNIGHT OF THE GARTER, ETC. ETC.,

THE SECOND EDITION OF THESE POEMS IS INSCRIBED,

BY HIS

OBLIGED WARD AND AFFECTIONATE KINSMAN,

THE AUTHOR.

PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION.

:

IN submitting to the public eye the following collection, I have not only to combat the difficulties that writers of verse generally encounter, but may incur the charge of presumption for obtruding myself on the world, when, without doubt, I might be, at my age, more usefully employed.

These productions are the fruits of the lighter hours of a young man who has lately completed his nineteenth year. As they bear the internal evidence of a boyish mind, this is perhaps unnecessary information. Some few were written during the disadvantages of illness and depression of spirits : under the former influence, 'Childish RECOLLECTIONS,' in particular, were composed. This consideration, though it cannot excite the voice of praise, may at least arrest the arm of censure. A considerable portion of these poems has been privately printed, at the request and for the perusal of my friends. I am sensible that the partial and frequently injudicious admiration of a social circle is not the criterion by which poetical genius is to be estimated: yet, 'to do greatly,' we must 'dare greatly ;' and I have hazarded my reputation and feelings in publishing this volume. “I have passed the Rubicon,' and must stand or fall by the cast of the die. In the latter event, I shall submit without a murmur ; for, though not without solicitude for the fate of these effusions, my expectations are by no means sanguine. It is probable that I may have dared much and done little ; for, in the words of Cowper, it is one thing to write what may please our friends, who, because they are such, are apt to be a little biassed in our favour, and another to write what may please everybody ; because they who have no connection, or even knowledge of the author, will be sure to find fault if they can.' To the truth of this, however, I do not wholly subscribe ; on the contrary, I feel convinced that these trifles will not be treated with injustice. Their merit, if they possess any, will be liberally allowed; their numerous faults, on the other hand, cannot expeci that favour which has been denied to others of maturer years, decided character, and far greater ability.

I have not aimed at exclusive originality, still less have I studied any particular model for imitation : some translations are given, of which many are paraphrastic. In the original pieces there may appear a casual coincidence with authors whose works I have been accustomed to

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