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JOHN HEYWOOD'S

COMPLETE SERIES OF

HOME LESSON BOOKS

for use in Public Clementary Schools,

IN SIX BOOKS CORRESPONDING TO THE SIX STANDARDS OF

THE NEW CODE. (1875).

BOOK II. FOR STANDARD II.,
Containing Lessons in Holy Scripture, Moral Poetry, Transcription,

Dictation, Arithmetic, Spelling, Grammar, and Geography,

BY

ALFONZO GARDINER,

HEAD MASTER OF THE OUTCOTE-BANK BOARD SCHOOL

(HUDDERSFIELD SCHOOL BOARD).

Author of " Acoustics, Light, and Heat,” “Magnetism and
Electricity,” “Electricity," in Extra Subject Series, &c.
and joint Author of “Plane and Solid Geometry,"

“Science Manuals."

MANCHESTER :
JOHN HEYWOOD, 141 AND 143, DEANSGATE.

EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT, 141, DEANSGATE.
LONDON : SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, & Co. ; J. C. Tacey.

2

ART. 28, NEW CODE (1875), STANDARD II.

READING.–To read with intelligence a short paragraph from an

Elementary Reading Book. WRITING.-A sentence from the same book, slowly read once, and then

Dictated. Copy books (large or half-text) to be shown. ARITHMETIC.–Subtraction, Multiplication, and Short Division. GRAMMAR.– To point out the nouns in the passage read. GEOGRAPHY.—Definitions, points of compass, forms and motions of

earth, the meaning of a map.

NEW EDITION.

ANSWERS TO THE ARITHMETICAL EXAMPLES

IN

JOHN HEYWOOD'S HOME LESSON BOOKS.

In Six Books corresponding to the Standards, 2d. each.

PAPER.

The advice given in Book I. for Standard I., as to the manner of using the books, is in the main applicable to the whole series.

The DICTATION LESSON on Tuesday is not meant to preclude the setting of other dictation lessons in school during the week. In the lower standards all dictation lessons should be prepared, and should not consist, as a rule, of more than four or five lines. As to the correction of such lessons, there is no plan so effective as the personal and individual examination of every exercise by the teacher. With a large class and a long exercise this will be impossible, within a reasonable time ; but an active teacher who carefully dictates three or four lines, a word or two at a time, will be quite able to allow a class of 50, five minutes to prepare the lesson, and have it "given out" and corrected in half-an-hour. After slates are examined the children should write every mistake again correctly four or six times each. Mistakes should include badly formed letters, omitted stops, and want or misuse of capitals, as well as bad spelling. IT IS STRONGLY ADVISED THAT TUESDAY'S LESSON BE ALWAYS WRITTEN ON

Half a leaf of an “Exercise Book” will do for two lessons, if the children have no book on purpose.

Occasionally Tuesday's Lesson may be used as a simple spelling lesson, and the class be examined orally on the hard words.

In GEOGRAPHY, the teacher is strongly advised, instead of always using maps, to make a MODEL to illustrate the definitions. Take a large sheet of common thick glass to represent the water, and with clay, plaster of Paris, or putty, to represent the land, make an ideal continent in which all the chief definitions are prominently shown. Children can then see for themselves the difference between a mountain chain and a range, a plain and a plateau, etc. ; they can notice that rivers rise in mountains, and generally run through valleys, and further see how they form lakes. Everything, in fact, can be brought vividly before their eyes. A map of the world on Mercator's projection, made in this manner, will be exceedingly useful all the Standards. It is intended that the lines in large type be committed to memory, the rest read only.

In GRAMMAR, the chief difficulty will be with abstract nouns. It is hoped the lessons here given will help to make the subject clear to both teacher and scholar.

In order that the class may always be prepared for new work, it is absolutely necessary that the TIME TABLE be so arranged that lessons in Grammar, Geography, and Arithmetic shall be given before they have to be done at home. There will then be no reason for the common excuse, Please sir, I couldn't do it; it was too hard."

As in Standard I., a great number of examples, marked thus (*) which have been given by Her Majesty's Inspectors in their examinations, are incorporated in the book.

HOME LESSONS-STANDARD II.

FIRST WEEK.
Lesson 1.-Learn for Monday Morning.
PSALM XXIII., verses 1, 2, 3 ; OR ELSE LEARN-—

BE KIND TO EACH OTHER.
Be kind to each other!

The night's com-ing on,
When friend and when broth-er

Per-chance may be gone.
Then, 'midst our de-jec-tion,

How sweet to have earn-ed
The blest re-col-lec-tion,

Of kind-ness re-turn-ed !
Lesson 2.-Tuesday Morn. Write and Learn. Geography.

THE EARTH.
Ge-og'-ra-phy* tells us about the surface of the Earth.
The World on which we live is nearly round.
It is a large ball the shape of an orange.

The earth does not look round to you, but there are many ways in which it can be shown to be round. If you went a great way up into the

air in a balloon, and looked down to the earth, it would appear round. Lesson 3.--Wednesday Morning. Work Write and these Sums.

Learn, (1) 85,300 + 4,097 + 70,079 + 7,208 + 630 + 7 X 1 = 8,704.

7 x 2 14 (2) From twenty-seven thousand and sixty- 7 x 3 = 21 three take four thousand, five hundred and ninety- 7 X 4 = 28

7 x 5 35 Write out each word six times and Learn.

7 X 6 = 42 Bruise, Eaves, Fright, Grief.

one.

* A globe and a good map of the world should always be used in geography lessons. Every new word should be written on the black board and care. fully spelled and pronounced till all the children have learned it thoroughly. (Şee Preface.)

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