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61TE judge, an observer of his own times told Spence; or to what t Steele, (of which confession othere is no other account) confirmed in 180ME DEGREE to Mr. Chute, who observes from

SOME what Sir Richard dropt in various conversations; lit seems to have been too true,"sor of what Daie Leightold Spence" (of) a fact which his friend bad witnessed !!!orton sved! w goissescent

I must not yet lay down the pen; I have taken it up reluctantly, and upon subjects that have almost faded from my recollection whilst

my antagonist is just fresh in the field, advancing with looks of peculiar spleen, and with the vaunting language of sarcastic cons! tumelyidw badaildug od blwode eradiel awo eid tsdt gaiviTSMO9

But I bate not a." jot, of heart or hopel-branu supported by that which has supported wiser and better men, a heart unconer scious that I have deseryed either such a tone of criticaloansult or such severe and aggravated charges. My weapon is plain truth against weak arguments, positive assertions, unfair deductions, palpable exaggerations, and gross mis-representations. 10901 10 09

This part of my defence I should snow wish to close, but must take notice of one indefinite accusation brought againstrime, by which, this “ asperser,” as with a coup de grace; seems toohaver

, collected his remaining force.netto 9916o anoisotto ad os 2A He

Sogoan I have exceeded g any sijusti símits which hecano assign to the defence of our great Poet;'l-(why did he not risayı greatest !) but much remains to be said, for without s followingd Mr. Bowles, step by step, how can the sly insinuation, the obscurer hint, the damning facts anxiously recorded, (What excess of candor!) with a faint admission that it might not be true,oberrebutted? It did not become a man whose personal virtues are acknows ledged, to aggravate common infirmities rinto viciousness, anditbit tear away the veil from the sandtitiesi tof domestic difer" Thent follows (excess of candor !) site We shouldd be grieved to incùr thes; displeasure of Mr. Bowles, but we cannot rat concer sacrifices truth 2o and Pope,

and the commentator ought to thank us forsourw delicacy, of not dwelling op the indecency of some of his notes.Pecel

The commentator has followed with much paintibut" no disage pleasure the critiq" step by step?? and herleaves the public, at whose bar they, both stand, to pronounce whether he is guilty or not guilty of the charges brought against him er He has not much doubt of the verdict, now he has been so far heard in bis defencer but the last charge, into which the critic has compressed so much, is more difficult plainly

to rebuts The“ obscure hint;lthe sky ihusise nuation, the damning fact, antiously recorded, butu(excesslofs candor) with a faint admissions that it may Not BÉOtrue!!! if those are not specified, weither can they ble rebutted. te nisise of 10

Infirmities I have spoken of, but I think I have proved that the

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critic, not the commentator having aggravated into viciousness, what I was called upon from conscientious belief, to state, has more than aggravated every thing I have said into yiciousness, when he says, I did for Hate what Mallet did for Hire!

The "sneer"!, theil gi insinuation," I retort on himself! The damning fact, I have not recorded anxiously," but the fact, if it belff damhing,I have not concealed, that Pope received hospitalitos and kindness from Chandos, and then held him up to eternal ridiculeizi the fact I have spoken of, and proved that he used'stratagem, such as every ingenuous mind would disdain, of artfully contriving that his own letters should be published, whilst he affected to express-indignation at the publication." Other facts, which I should have thought a dereliction of

h to conceal, I have also spoken of, but I have spoken of them, God is my Judge! without setting them down zaught in malice," so far from anxiously recording” them, so far from * exulting,” I have spoken of them, as ideduced from moral and physical circumstances operating on the mind! I bave spoken of them, as spots, amidst many anrk lucid u wintues, asi 1 defects arising from personal weakness,lor deficient education so's & diw 6 (791128

As to the atrocious charge of tearing away the SANCTITLES of domestic life ! Ilam utterly ignorant of his meaning! Does he mean that I have spoken of Pope's attachment to Teresa Blount, before his affections were finally fixed on Martha ? What“ SANCTIEK ofridomestic life is torn away? Where is the crime imputed? What SANOTITy was there to ir tear away?"

The connection between Martha Blount and Pope is well known to all they were for the last years of his existence and til: bis zye-lids.closedy generally speaking, inseparable; what SA'NCTiT is 'violated in narrating the circumstance, that

his first tender feelings, without the slightest shade of imputed guilt, were twned to Teresa, sand afterwards transferred to Martha If there wasoany thing improper in the later connection, the connection at least was not concealed ; and to say that a young man, in his green

, agejhlooked with partiality on another, ill deserves the aggravated acousation of teating away the $ANCTITIES from domestic life,” when there were no SANCTITIESI" to tear away D. Lud Bome

Hi, ibyothis seridus accusation, the critic means to allude to what I have said of Pope's attachment to Lady Mary-- the expressions of his off erotie fever! convey a stronger idea of the nature of his attachmenty than any words I have used; and the rude burst of

36 laughter,'ks which he has to recorded,” when Pope spoke of his “wretchedi body,” but “congenial mind," might have taught him, not to strain at sagrats when he was swallowing camels." HJE!

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I am not blaming him for recording this “ rude laughter” at this preposterous lover; but surely he had no right to charge me with a crime so great as “ tearing away the sanctities of domestic life," when I spoke in less offensive terms than that of Erotic fever” of Pope's known youthful attachment to Lady Mary, or earlier attachment to Teresa Blount. x fon luon sie

Of these things I have spoken, without the consciousness of the slightest EXAGGERATION, Nor did I, nor do I think, that speaking as I have done of them, was in the least degree indelicately offensive, or criminally violating any " sanctities;” and if it be, let him share this criminality with me!

30 But whilst I deny that I have wilfully concealed any one of Pope's virtues (so far from surmising EVERY ONE away") I will never compromise my opinions, or give up my right to express them,' when“ baseness appears; and base shall that conduct always be fearlessly called by me, which stoops, from disappointed passion, to direct indelicate and envenomed satire against an object once beloved; and I affirm, if you say that Lady Mary' was not intended, by Sapphio, which I do not believe, and which you cannot prove: then, I say, to use a name which HB KNEW WAS applied by berself, and by all the world, to that one person alone, was as base as bis evasions were pitiful. And if my bitter commentator has not the heart to feel this, let him stigmatise me as much and as raucorously as he pleases. I The "infirmity is not aggravated into “viciousness," for no aggrayation can make

We are now drawing to a conclusion, at least, of the charges brought against me, as the “ vilifier” of Pope's character. If the reader has followed me so far, with attention, I am thankful ; still more if he should feel convinced, as I have little doubt, that i point of “ aggravation," I have been far more signed against ihan SINNING!"

The critic's last accusation is mixed with antes affectation of tenderness towards me, 'in not exposing the indecency of 'some of my notes ! 1«. It is by no means certain the distich applies to Lady M/

, for we can prove he had applied the name of Sappho to Mrs, Thomas.", Mrs. Thomas, good Sir, was dead, when this, distich was written. Pope, in his evasion, does not mention her name, but the names of Mrs. Manley, Behr, Centlivre, &c. But none of these had written libels on him; and, therefore, the line will not suit one of them. Lady Mary was the only Sappho who had « libelled him," as he himself says, in lines afterwards suppressed; cred “ ; 1 í lhe

" He wrote no libels; but my Lady did !"9:11 191 And in this very passage he had applied the name “Sappho:"

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" The commentator oight to thank us, for our delicacy, for not dwelling on the indecency of some of his notes!”.$? What! has so mach' * aggravation” been employed to make

& Pope's commentator think there is any * delicacy,” for which he ought to *** THINK! this critic,' or 'to induce him to believe that he would not have exposed the indecency of the notes" if ÁLCOOL D0% di tunden poi The commentator indignantly rejects his proffered “delicacy!" If a single indecent note" could be pointed out, he should indeed be sorry to express this is all he can do, but as the critic has not spared the commentator in any instance where he thought he could Bring a charge against him, so he sincerely believes he deliberately intended to imply a charge where he knew he could not bring one. ***I have just before said, his segueers ” and his insinuations I re

" port on himself!t, peperustega hafi -do The riseer"itthvat follows' is despicable indeed. ***; more 67 Loral Byron had published, in his animated satire on English

Bards and Seotek Reviewers," a laughable passage, and ascribed this passage to me!!! N'S 3!!! , I

No construction of my language could possibly bear bim Iuut, in such a representation. However,

However, it was read, and believed, and laughed at ! Lord Byron' was of too 'noble a mind to mistepresent'me deliberately; and on showing him the misstatement, he frankly acknowledged he had unintentionally done me wrong, and he had the generous magnanimity to say he would explain thie eircumstance, had he not given orders that the book should be suppressed! 9 to

cizren Fie I narrated the eireumbtance just as it happened, which affords This critid súch/ why-mouthed amusement. It is said " I spoke wa tune of seriousness, but with perfect good humour:" I did so.

Now with thatınaïvetélywhich you have attributed, to me, will I deçlare why the expression, 1

was used on this oc. casion, which seems to make it 8900 hunt was Gised for no other

you so merry. reason than to show I could speak of the critici-ms on any thing I had

in

without " ill-humour," as some such critic as you might have inferred, is concerned, perfectly good-Humoured, those who were present, and Lord Byron kimselt, if he remembers the circumstance, 'will witness

. Whether you will feel in as infant

perfect goud-Kumour," when I have a little farther probed your criticism, as I felt whep Lord Byron probed my poetry, I know problemen Where are some touches whicu'must make you" wince," if you have any sensibility, in finding baseness and falsehood luid bare to the sinews ; fur there is this difference between my poetry and your proses Lord Byron, what concerns myself in this article. I have no doubt

a sore place in the one, but the other is putrid from head to foot, two hands were concerned, because, where-prejudice does not interfere, it is entertaining and sensible.

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