Four Dialogues Between an Oxford Tutor and a Disciple of the Common-sense Philosophy: Relative to the Proximate Causes of Material Phenomena

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Sherwood, Jones & Company, 1824 - 204 páginas
 

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Página 175 - And God said, Let the waters under the heaven be gathered together unto one place, and let the dry land appear: and it was so. And God called the dry land Earth; and the gathering together of the waters called He seas: and God saw that it was good.
Página 175 - ... material influence in the modification of Christianity in accordance with Greek philosophy. During many centuries afterwards Plato and Aristotle maintained their ascendancy, not only in the schools of science but of theology as well. Upon reference to the Scriptural account of the creation, we read that " the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters...
Página 169 - This accumulated excitement does not, however, burst the generator, because the strength, other things alike, is inversely as the dimensions, and the thickness can conveniently, in so small a bulk, be increased to any required degree ; thus, less of the motion transferred from the combustion is lost, than when, by the old system, steam was simultaneously generated ; and the continued addition accelerates the excitement of the water, on the principle of accelerated motion in falling bodies. From this...
Página 170 - It isa case of motion compressed. The confined atoms of water are not to be supposed at rest ; on the contrary, no motion is lost or gained in the whole process. It previously existed in the gases of the atmosphere; these are fixed by the combustion, which is a mere process of gaseous fixation ; the generator and its contained water are placed in contact; the atoms in water receive the motion, but are unable, for want of space, to exhibit any of it in forming steam ; the...
Página 168 - ... force ; or, if accelerated, the acceleration depended on the vague dimensions and decreasing strength of an extended surface of boiler. But Mr. Perkins has contrived to press his liquid into his boiler or generator, home to the interior 'surface of his generator, and to keep it full, so that no steam can be simultaneously generated ; and hence, as the motion transferred by the fixation of the gases in the adjacent combustion is not simultaneously distributed in steam, the contained water receives...
Página 168 - ... of steam. The atomic motion, transferred by the fixation of the gases in the process of the external combustion, passes through the substance of the vessel containing the water, and its first effect has been to convert the adjoining liquid into steam. Room being allowed, in ordinary boilers, for the expansion of this steam, the ultimate force consisted only of the first simple force ; or, if accelerated, the acceleration depended on the vague dimensions and decreasing strength of an extended...
Página 170 - ... unable, for want of space, to exhibit any of it in forming steam ; the continuance of the transfer of motion causes acceleration, and a violent tendency to escape, which, however, is prevented, till the excitement is sufficient to evolve gas of the required power. Rationally explained, Mr. P.'s machine is founded on principles strictly philosophical :— he has safely generated a force before unknown ; and, if he had failed to apply it with skill, his past reputation, as a mechanic of the first...
Página 172 - I am peivnaded, that the application of the force transferred by combustion through water, for the purpose of arriving at mechanical power, will by posterity be considered as a very bungling procedure ; and I think that it has been continued merely because mankind have been confounded by...
Página 7 - ... PHILIPS, Curran, and Grattan. Speeches of. 8vo. Philadelphia, 1831. PHILLIPS, J. A General History of Inland Navigation, Foreign and Domestic. 8vo. London, 1809. PHILLIPS, SIR RICHARD. A Familiar Cyclopaedia and Dictionary of the Arts of Life and Civilization. 8vo. London. PHILLIPS, SIR RICHARD. Four Dialogues between an Oxford Tutor and a Disciple of the Common Sense Philosophy. 8vo. London, 1824. Presented by Dr. Samuel Akerly, PHILLIPS, SIR RICHARD. Golden Rules of Social Philosophy, or a...
Página 169 - But as soon as Mr. P. has sufficiently excited his water, he allows some of it to escape, and every drop then evolves in steam many hundred times the original bulk. The excited atoms, of course, perform large orbits, creating a local vacuum, therefore, a perception of coldness to the evaporating hand plunged into it, and a force of expansion, equal to any required, as 5001bs.

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