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CHAP.

PAGE. III. Slavery

- 236
IV. Charity.--Profesional Asistance 241
y. Charity.Pecuniary Bounty -
VI. Resentment . - : -
VII. Anger - - - 261
VIIL Revenge -
IX. Duelling - - - 272
X. Litigation - - . - 277

Gratitude
XII. Slander -

BOOK III.

P ART III. OF RELATIVE DUTIES WHICH RESULT FROM · The CONSTITUTION OF THE SEXES, AND

OF THE CRIMES OPPOSITE TO THESE. 1. Of the public Use of Marriage Institutions 293 II. Fornication - - - 295 ĮIỊ. Seduction

304 IV. Adultery

309 V. Incest

316 VI. Polygamy

319 VII. Of Divorce :

-326 VIII. Marriage

339 IX. Of the Duty of Parents

345 X. The Rights of Parents XI, The Duty of Children

371

368

BOOK I.

PRELIMINARY CONSIDERATIONS.

G H A P.

I.

DEFINITION AND USE OF THE SCIENCE.

ORAL PHILOSOPHY, Morality, Ethics,

Casuistry, Natural Law, mean all the

* same thing; namely, That science which teaches men their duty and the reasons of it.

The use of such a study depends upon this, that, without it, the rules of life, by which men are ordinarily governed, oftentimes mislead them, through a defect either in the rule, or in the application. * These rules are, the Law of Honour, the Law of the Land, and the Scriptures.

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СНА Р. ІІ.

THE LAW OF HONOU R.

THE Law of Honour is a system of rules

1 constructed by people of fashion, and calculated to facilitate their intercourse with one another; and for no other purpose.

Consequently, nothing is adverted to by the Law of Honour, but what tends to incommode this intercourse.

Hence this law only prescribes and regulates the duties betwixt equals ; omitting such as relate to the Supreme Being, as well as those which we owe to our inferiors.

For which reason, profaneness, neglect of public worship or private devotion, cruelty to servants, rigorous treatment of tenants or other dependants, want of charity to the poor, injuries done to tradesmen by insolvency or delay of payment, with numberless examples of the same kind, are accounted no breaches of honour; because a man is not a less agreeable companion for these vices, nor the worse to deal with, in

those those concerns which are usually transacted between one gentleman and another.

Again, the Law of Honour being constituted by men occupied in the pursuit of pleasure, and for the mutual conveniency of such men, will be found, as might be expected from the character and design of the law-makers, to be, in most instances, favourable to the licentious indulgence of the natural passions.

Thus it allows of fornication, adultery, drunkenness, prodigality, duelling, and of revenge in the extreme; and lays no stress upon the virtues opposite to these.

CH A P. III.

THE LAW OF THE LAND.

THAT part of mankind, who are beneath

1 the Law of Honour, often make the Law of the Land their rule of life; that is, they are fatisfied with themselves, so long as they do or

omit nothing, for the doing or omitting of which - the law can punish them.

B 2

Whereas

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