Native Liberty, Crown Sovereignty: The Existing Aboriginal Right of Self-government in Canada

Portada
McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, 1992 - 259 páginas
Thirteen essays explore some 500 years of literacy campaigns in vastly different societies: Reformation Germany, early modern Sweden and Scotland, 19th century US, 19th-20th century Russia and the Soviet Union, pre-revolutionary and revolutionary China, and a variety of Third World countries. The 1763 Royal Proclamation forbade non-natives under British authority to molest or disturb any tribe or tribal territory in British North America. Clark, a lawyer specializing in aboriginal rights, contends that this Proclamation had legislative force and that, since imperial law on this matter has never been repealed, the right to self-government continues to exist for Canadian natives. He also explores the difficulties of aboriginal self-government in the constitution and offers some advice to government and aboriginal negotiators. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

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Contenido

COMMON LAW OF SELFGOVERNMENT
11
Domestic Common Law
12
Constitutional Common Law
37
THE PREROGATIVE LEGISLATION
58
Royal Commissions Instructions and the Proclamation of 1763
70
CONTINUITY
84
NonRepeal of the Prerogative Legislation
85
The Indian Territories Statutes
98
DISCONTINUITY THE ANTITHESIS
124
Responsible Government and Enclaves
131
LAW REFORM AND THE NEGOTIATION PROCESS
147
CONCLUSION
191
Constitutional Milestones
205
Bibliography
219
Index
249
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