Chambers's Edinburgh journal, conducted by W. Chambers. [Continued as] Chambers's Journal of popular literature, science and arts

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Página 67 - We were now treading that illustrious island, which was once the luminary of the Caledonian regions, whence savage clans and roving barbarians derived the benefits of knowledge, and the blessings of religion. To abstract the mind from all local emotion would be impossible, if it were endeavoured, and would be foolish, if it were possible. Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses ; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us...
Página 176 - Is not a Patron, my Lord, one who looks with unconcern on a man struggling for life in the water, and when he has reached ground, encumbers him with help...
Página 297 - Two angels, one of Life and one of Death, Passed o'er our village as the morning broke ; The dawn was on their faces, and beneath, The sombre houses hearsed with plumes of smoke.
Página 115 - With that grim ferryman which poets write of, Unto the kingdom of perpetual night. The first that there did greet my stranger soul, Was my great father-in-law, renowned Warwick; Who cried aloud, 'What scourge for perjury Can this dark monarchy afford false Clarence?
Página 167 - For it's my delight, of a shiny night, In the season of the year.
Página 297 - All is of God ! If he but wave his hand, The mists collect, the rain falls thick and loud, Till, with a smile of light on sea and land, Lo ! he looks back from the departing cloud.
Página 297 - Like a picture it seemed of the primitive, pastoral ages, Fresh with the youth of the world, and recalling Rebecca and Isaac, Old and yet ever new, and simple and beautiful always, Love immortal and young in the endless succession of lovers.
Página 57 - ... that so provident a cause as nature had not placed so many valves without design ; and no design seemed more probable than that, since the blood could not well, because of the interposing valves, be sent by the veins to the limbs, it should be sent through the arteries and return through the veins, whose valves did not oppose its course that way.
Página 84 - Higher still and higher From the earth thou springest Like a cloud of fire; The blue deep thou wingest, And singing still dost soar, and soaring ever singest. In the golden lightning Of the sunken sun O'er which clouds are brightening, Thou dost float and run, Like an unbodied joy whose race is just begun.
Página 243 - That while a lassie she had worn, In longitude tho' sorely scanty, It was her best, and she was vauntie. — Ah...

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