The universal class-book: a ser. of reading lessons

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Contenido

CCXXXIII
333
Lines by the Hon St George Tucker
337
Chatterton
338
The Combats of the Alphabet or the Origin CCXXXIX
339
James Thomson
341
Herculaneum
342
Thomas Blood
344
CCXLII
345
31 A Tropical Sky 338 339 341 342 344 345
347
SEPT
348
Louis XIV
349
A Lament for Summer
351
4 Hacho King of Lapland
352
5 The Toadeater CCXLIX
354
CCL
355
8 Bishop Hall CCLII CCLIII CCLIV
356
William the Conqueror
357
Recollections and Associations
358
The Soldiers Dream
359
Genius
360
CCLXI
366
CCLXXI
378
CCLXXV
384
14
402
Oct 29 George Alexander Stevens
420
The Hare and the Tortoise CCCIV 31 The Bigoted Sceptic CCCIII NOVEMBER
421
CCCX
426
The Art of Perspective
427
Character of the Hindûs
428
Gunpowder Plot
429
Princess Charlotte
430
Fata Morgana
432
Capture of Warsaw
433
Lord Mayors Day
434
Scottish Music
435
Opium
437
Edict against Duelling
438
Counsellor Curran
439
14 A Picture of the present Month
440
15 Sir William Herschel
442
16 The Horrors of a Slave Ship
443
17 Fidelity of the Followers of Charles Edward Stuart
444
The Conquest of Mexico by Cortes
445
Fraternal Affection
446
England in the Fifteenth Century 24 The South Sea Bubble 450 453 454 455 CCCXXIV 20 Lead CCCXXV CCCXXVI 22 Lord Clive CCCXXVII
450
CCCXXVIII
451
25 Dr Watts
453
The English Tin Mines
454
Character of Diocletian
455
28 Cardinal Wolsey
456
John
457
Dean Swift
458
DEC 1 History
461
St Pauls Cathedral
462
Winter
463
CCCXXXVIII
464
CCCXLI 4 Locusts 5 Dr Hawes
465
The Love of Native Scenery 7 Algernon Sidney 9 Milton CCCXLII 8 Mary Queen of Scots
468
CCCXLIII
470
Anecdotes of Napoleon Buonaparte
471
11 The English Language
473
DEC 12 Captain Thompson
474
CCCLX
490
CCCLXIV
496

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Página 53 - Fairest of stars, last in the train of night, If better thou belong not to the dawn, Sure pledge of day, that crown'st the smiling Morn With thy bright circlet, praise him in thy sphere While day arises, that sweet hour of prime.
Página 53 - These are thy glorious works, Parent of good, Almighty ! thine this universal frame, Thus wondrous fair : thyself how wondrous then ! Unspeakable ! who sitt'st above these Heavens To us invisible, or dimly seen In these thy lowest works ; yet these declare Thy goodness beyond thought, and power divine.
Página 21 - We thought, as we hollowed his narrow bed, And smoothed down his lonely pillow, That the foe and the stranger would tread o'er his head, And we far away on the billow ! Lightly they'll talk of the spirit that's gone, And o'er his cold ashes upbraid him ; But little hell reck if they let him sleep on In the grave where a Briton has laid him...
Página 213 - Then I, and you, and all of us fell down, Whilst bloody treason flourish'd over us. O, now you weep, and I perceive you feel The dint of pity; these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what! weep you when you but behold Our Caesar's vesture wounded ? Look you here, Here is himself, marr'd as you see, with traitors.
Página 156 - To them his heart, his love, his griefs were given, But all his serious thoughts had rest in Heaven. As some tall cliff that lifts its awful form, Swells from the vale, and midway leaves the storm...
Página 155 - Near yonder copse, where once the garden smiled, And still where many a garden flower grows wild ; There, where a few torn shrubs the place disclose, The village preacher's modest mansion rose. A man he was to all the country dear, And passing rich with forty pounds a year...
Página 213 - And bid them speak for me: but were I Brutus, And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue In every wound of Caesar that should move The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.
Página 84 - I had thought myself in an ancient castle (a very natural dream for a head filled like mine with Gothic story) and that on the uppermost bannister of a great staircase I saw a gigantic hand in armour. In the evening I sat down and began to write, without knowing in the least what I intended to say or relate.
Página 364 - After laying down my pen, I took several turns in a berceau, or covered walk of acacias, which commands a prospect of the country, the lake, and the mountains. The air was temperate, the sky was serene, the silver orb of the moon was reflected from the waters, and all nature was silent.
Página 462 - A fire devoureth before them; and behind them a flame burneth: the land is as the garden of Eden before them, and behind them a desolate wilderness; yea, and nothing shall escape them.

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