The Sum of All Heresies: The Image of Islam in Western Thought

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Oxford University Press, 2007 M11 21 - 232 páginas
Current global tensions and the spread of terrorism have resurrected in the West a largely negative perception of Islamic society, an ill will fueled by centuries of conflict and prejudice. Shedding light on the history behind these hostile feelings, Frederick Quinn's timely volume traces the Western image of Islam from its earliest days to recent times. Quinn establishes four basic themes around which the image of Islam gravitates throughout history: the Prophet as Antichrist, heretic, and Satan; the Prophet as Fallen Christian, corrupted monk, or Arab Lucifer; the prophet as sexual deviant, polygamist, and charlatan, and the Prophet as Wise Easterner, Holy Person, and dispenser of wisdom. A feature of the book is a strong portrayal of Islam in literature, art, music, and popular culture, drawing on such sources as Cervantes's Don Quixote; the Orientalism of numerous visual artists; the classical music of Monteverdi and Mozart; and more recent cultural manifestations, such as music hall artists like Peter Dawson and Edith Piaf; and stage or silver screen representations like The Garden of Allah, The Sheik, Aladdin, and The Battle of Algiers. Quinn argues that an outpouring of positive information on basically every aspect of Islamic life has yet to vanquish the hostile and malformed ideas from the past. Conflict, mistrust, and misunderstanding characterize the Muslim-Christian encounter, and growing examples of cooperation are often overshadowed by anger and suspicion. In this important book, Quinn highlights long-standing historical prejudices but also introduces the reader to some of the landmark voices in history that have worked toward a greater understanding of Islam.

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Contenido

Introduction
3
1 The Prophet as Antichrist and Arab Lucifer Early Times to 1600
17
2 The Time of Araby Has Come at Last 16001800
55
3 The Prophet as Hero and Wise Easterner 18001900
91
4 Nous Revenons Saladin We Return Saladin 19002000
125
5 The Summing Up
159
Am I Not Your Lord? Kenneth Cragg on MuslimChristian Dialogue
173
Notes
181
Selected Bibliography
201
Index
215
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Frederick Quinn is Adjunct Professor of History at Utah State University, in Logan, Utah. An Episcopal Priest and a retired senior Foreign Service officer who worked in North Africa, he is the author of several books on history, religion, and law.

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