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England," "That is a falsehood," replied the same voice in a shriller tone, “not a half nor a quarter: where are the people or their representatives? Oliver Cromwell is a rogue and a traitor.” Axtell, the officer who guarded the court, gave orders to fire at the place from whence these insolent speeches proceeded; but it was discovered that Lady Fairfax was there, and that it was she who had the courage to utter them. She was a person of noble birth, the daughter of Horace, Lord Vere, of Tilbury; she had long encouraged her husband's zeal against the royal cause, and

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was now, like himself, filled with abhorrence at the fatal and unexpected consequences of all his victories and successes.

After order was restored, Bradshaw-Charles still attempting to interfere-pronounoed sentence: "That the court being satisfied in conscience that he, Charles Stuart, was guilty of the crimes of which he had been accused, did adjudge him as a tyrant, traitor, murderer, and public enemy of the good people of this nation, to be put to death by severing his head from his body."

The king again endeavoured to speak, but was sternly forbidden, the guards being ordered to remove him from the bar. He was taken back to St. James's Palace, where he spent the remainder of the day, Sunday the 28th, and Monday the 29th of January—the execution being fixed for Tuesday the 30th. Bishop Juxon was in attendance on him, and he was allowed an interview with his children, the Duke of Gloucester and the Princess Elizabeth. The interview, an account of which was afterwards written by the princess, was extremely affecting.

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The king did not perish without an effort to save him. Prince Charles sent over a carte blanche, signed in his own hand and sealed with his seal, only entreating the Parliament to spare his father's life and make what terms they pleased. The States of Holland interceded; the Scottish Parliament protested; but protest, intercession, and appeal were all alike in vain.

On the morning of his execution Charles dressed himself with peculiar care, saying it was his second marriage day and he would be as trim as possible. He wore two shirts, saying if he shivered with the cold the

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THE STORY OF THE KING AND THE COMMONS.

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she had long encouraged her husband's zeal

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divested himself of his George, and gave it we word—“Remember." He then, without any of fear, laid his head on the block. There was flashed in the light of a wintry sunbeam--a heavy had killed the king.

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THE STORY OF THE KING AXO A PONS

endeavoured to speak, but was seen red to remove him from the bus. e, where he spent the remainide of the the 29th of January the end bop Juxon was in attendance en die with his childre, the Date of The interview, a avut was extremely affecting

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Cromwell at the Siege of Drogheda.

THE STORY OF THE "CURSE OF CROMWELL."

. (A.D. 1649-50.)

N the Story of the Irish Massacre we have shown what frightful

atrocities were committed by the Catholics on the Protestant settlers. It is an awful picture of blind bigotry and vindictive

cruelty. But it is equalled in every dark shade, excepting that of treachery, by the acts of the Parliamentary army under the command of Oliver Cromwell-acts which have made the “the Curse o’ Cromwell” the bitterest malediction an Irish Catholic peasant can employ.

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rogues would say he trembled. He was summoned from St. James's by Colonel Hacker, at ten in the forenoon. A double line of infantry formed a path through the park to Whitehall; an escort of infantry with colours flying and drums beating awaited him. Juxon walked on the king's right hand; Colonel Tomlinson on the left. On reaching Whitehall the king ascended the stairs with a light step, proceeded to his own chamber, and there remained until past one, when he was summoned to the scaffold.

The scaffold was erected in front of the banqueting house, a window being taken out so that it might give access to the platform. The scaffold and the block were draped with black cloth, the axe enveloped in crape. The king addressed the people, but was heard only by those who stood near him on the scaffold. In his speech he asserted his entire innocence of all the crimes laid to his charge, and declared that he died the martyr of the people.

When the king had concluded his speech he put his hair up under a cap and the bishop said to him, “There is but one stage more, which, though turbulent and troublesome, is yet a very short one. Consider, it will carry you a great way—even from earth to heaven.”

I go," he answered, "from a corruptible to an incorruptible crownwhere no disturbance can take place.”

“You exchange,” said the bishop, a temporal for at eternal crowna good exchange."

The king took off his cloak, divested himself of his George, and gave it to Juxon, uttering but one word—“Remember.” He then, without any resistance, or any sign of fear, laid his head on the block. There was intense silence, the axe flashed in the light of a wintry sunbeam--a heavy thud—and the Commons had killed the king.

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