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MICHAEL ADRIAN DE RUYTER.]

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W.THOMAS,

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(From a Dutch Original.)

conqueror. He might have taken all, but he knew that their boats were the property of poor men, and that their freight was human food; demanding therefore only a tithe of the herrings, he allowed the Dutch fishers to depart unmolested, and was blamed at home as quixotic, rather than applauded as a type of that true chivalry, of which poor Quixot was a parody.

In the meantime Van Tromp appeared with 102 men-of-war and 10 fire ships in the Downs, and Kent was in arms to repel the menacing invader. From Deal to Sandown a double platform was erected mounted with cannon to sweep the shore should the Dutch attempt to land. But a calm kept the enemy as though at anchor in mid channel, and when a breeze sprung up, it blew off shore so that the Dutch were unable to fire in even a broadside. Finding himself baffled, Van Tromp turned his attention to the trading interests of his country. He saw the Baltic traders through the Sounds, the busses disperse to their fishing stations, the Indiamen separate to pursue their several voyages; and then he went and looked out for Blake. But a frightful tempest, in which, in the words of a Dutch writer, the ships "were buried by the sea in the most horrible abysses, and rose out of them only to be tossed up to the clouds," separated the combatants, and completely disabled the Dutch fleet. Blake's ship suffered, but the damage they sustained was slight in comparison with those under the command of Van Tromp, who returned to Holland with forty-two sail only, and was mobbed and dishonoured for a failure which had nothing whatever to do with want of either skill or courage.

A new squadron was rapidly fitted out by the Dutch, and Admirals De Witt and De Ruiter took the supreme command. They fell in with Blake off the North Foreland, and after a long and obstinate battle were disastrously beaten. With this defeat the elements could not be charged, and the Dutchmen began to suspect that they had dealt too hastily and harshly with their old commander Tromp. He was invited to resume his former position, a new fleet was prepared, and accepting the command the old admiral set sail.

It was winter, and in those days a winter campaign was scarcely ever contemplated. Blake had made his usual distribution of the fleet, and, ignorant of the activity in Dutch dockyards, or of the reappointment of Tromp, was unprepared for a great battle. Well aware of this, Tromp appeared off the Goodwins, challenging an engagement. Blake resolved

to fight, but not to leave the coast unguarded, and the unequal battle began. It was obstinately maintained on both sides; but the overwhelming force of the Dutch, the negligence of some of the English officers, and the want of a proper complement of men, gave Tromp the advantage. He captured two ships, the Garland and the Bonaventure, the rest of the fleet running into the Thames; and he vauntingly hoisted a broom at his mast-head, as a sign that he had swept the seas.

Blake wrote to the Parliament soliciting an immediate enquiry, pointing out the necessity for reinforcements, and tendering his own resignation. All his suggestions were listened to and acted on, except the last. He was assured of the full confidence of the country, and confirmed in his command.

As soon as reinforcements could be obtained, and the fleet was in a condition to engage, Blake rode out to give battle to the boastful Dutchman, and in the engagement which followed the enemy was successfully defeated with a loss of seventeen or eighteen men-of-war, and a large fleet of valuable merchantmen. In this battle Blake was wounded, but he thought nothing of his own hurt, so absorbed was he in his attention to his wounded comrades. Another and still more decisive battle was fought in the ensuing summer, after which Tromp told the deputies of the States it was impossible to fight the islanders any longer; and De Witt uttered in full council the humiliating confession: "The English are masters both of us and of the seas." But the members of the States General who had not personally to brave the seas and defy the sea-king, were resolved that one more blow should be directed against their powerful enemy. The Dutch squadrons, commanded by Tromp, Evertz, and De Ruiter, fell in with the English admiral. It was dusk when the ships hove in sight, and only a few shots were exchanged. In the morning a heavy gale and dirty weather prevented a renewal of the action. On the third day the battle was fought and the last shot delivered. The victory of the English was complete, the Dutch fleet destroyed, the veteran admiral shot through the heart, and, by the ruthless order, not of Blake, but of General Monk, who held a joint naval command, no quarter was given, and the carnage among the Dutch-a massacre rather than a battle.

Holland was forced to entreat terms of peace, to admit the supremacy of England, to banish royal exiles, and to make compensation for losses sustained.

The rejoicings were conducted with great enthusiasm in England; but

conqueror. He might have taken all, but he knew that their boats were the property of poor men, and that their freight was human food; demanding therefore only a tithe of the herrings, he allowed the Dutch fishers to depart unmolested, and was blamed at home as quixotic, rather than applauded as a type of that true chivalry, of which poor Quixot was a parody.

In the meantime Van Tromp appeared with 102 men-of-war and 10 fire ships in the Downs, and Kent was in arms to repel the menacing invader. From Deal to Sandown a double platform was erected mounted with cannon to sweep the shore should the Dutch attempt to land. But a calm kept the enemy as though at anchor in mid channel, and when a breeze

prung up, it blew off shore so that the Dutch were unable to fire in even a broadside. Finding himself bafiled, Van Tromp turned his attention to the trading interests of his country. He saw the Baltic traders through the Sounds, the busses disperse to their fishing stations, the Indiamen separate to pursue their several voyages; and then he went and looked out for Blake. But a frightful tempest, in which, in the words of a Dutch writer, the ships “were buried by the sea in the most horrible abysses, and rose out of them only to be tossed up to the clouds," separated the combatants, and completely disabled the Dutch fleet. Blake's ship suffered, but the damage they sustained was slight in comparison with those under the command of Van Tromp, who returned to Holland with forty-two sail only, and was mobbed and dishonoured for a failure which had nothing whatever to do with want of either skill or courage.

A new squadron was rapidly fitted out by the Dutch, and Admirals De Witt and De Ruiter took the supreme command. They fell in with Blake off the North Foreland, and after a long and obstinate battle were disastrously beaten. With this defeat the elements could not be charged, and the Dutchmen began to suspect that they had dealt too hastily and harshly with their old commander Tromp. He was invited to resume his former position, a new fleet was prepared, and accepting the command the old admiral set sail.

It was winter, and in those days a winter campaign was scarcely ever contemplated. Blake had made his usual distribution of the fleet, and, ignorant of the activity in Dutch dockyards, or of the reappointment of Tromp, was unprepared for a great battle. Well aware of this, Tromp appeared off the Goodwins, challenging an engagement. Blake resolved

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