From Colonials to Provincials: American Thought and Culture, 1680-1760

Portada
Cornell University Press, 2000 - 223 páginas

"This volume provides a succinct, analytical, well-conceived, and nicely written account of the development of colonial North American thought and culture from 1680 to the eve of the American Revolution. Not an anachronistic search for the origins of later American cultural forms, it situates the subject firmlv within a transatlantic context. The author emphasizes the extent to which improving communications and expanding connections helped to incorporate colonial settlers into a larger British world by providing them access and inviting them to become contributors to a burgeoning public culture of print, which consisted of newspapers, magazines, books, and 1etters.Whereas during the first seven decades of the seventeenth century, the colonies had been little more than crude and isolated outposts of English culture, from the late seventeenth century, he contends, they increasingly became like Scotland and Protestant Ireland, intellectual and cultural provinces of an expanding British Empire." –Jack P. Greene, Journal of American History

 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Contenido

INTRODUCTION
1
NOTES AND REFERENCES
183

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 203 - Edmund S. Morgan, American Slavery, American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia (New York: WW Norton & Company, 1975); Orlando Patterson, Slavery and Social Death: A Comparative Study (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1982). 21. Joan W. Scott, "The Evidence of Experience," Critical Inquiry 17 (Summer 1991): 776.

Información bibliográfica