Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

OR,

FAMILIAR CONVERSATIONS

FOR

CHILDREN

PRINCIPALLY UPON ENTOMOLOGICAL SUBJECTS.

BY A LADY.

“O LORD, how manifold are thy works : in wisdom hast thou
made them all: the earth is full of thy riches.”

Psalm civ. 24.
“ Stand still, and consider the wondrous works of God.”

JOB xxxvii. 14.

LONDON:
J. HATCHARD AND SON, 187, PICCADILLY.

1827.

18949. e. 24.

[blocks in formation]

LONDON: IBOTSON AND PALNER, PRINTERS, SAVOY STREET, STRAND,

PREFACE.

To lead the youthful mind early to the contemplation of the wonders of creation is most desirable; since the study of nature not only affords an agreeable relaxation from severer pursuits, and induces habits of observation and attention, but also furnishes the parent with a favourable opportunity of inculcating and illustrating important truths, from familiar objects, in a manner at once amusing and instructive.

Of all the subjects of natural history, botany and entomology are perhaps the best adapted to form a useful and entertaining study for children. And the latter, when separated from the practice of killing insects, is peculiarly so, from the wonderful instinct exhibited by many of those little creatures, and from the various changes which winged insects, particularly the lepidopterous tribes undergo; and which are so strongly emblematical of the death and resurrection of the human body.

It has been my endeavour, in the following pages, to blend instruction with amusement, in a series of conversations between a mother and her little girl; so as to render the study in question interesting to the young. And if any thing which is here said should, under the divine blessing, lead one young person (who before was thoughtless upon the subject) to see and acknowledge the hand of an omniscient, almighty, and merciful God, in the works of nature, I shall feel myself more than abundantly compensated.

I take this opportunity of acknowledging my obligations to an interesting publication, entitled “ An Introduction to Entomology,” by Kirby and Spence, upon whom I have occasionally drawn for information.

THE AUTHORESS.

CAROLINE AND HER MOTHER,

&c. &c.

CONVERSATION I.

COME, my dear children, put on your bonnets and coats, and let us take a walk; the sun shines bright and warm, and though the wind is cold, it is very pleasant. Let us go into the fields, and admire the beauties of the spring; the trees and hedges are beginning to bud, the daisies and butter-cups are springing up amongst the fresh green grass, the yellow flowers of the primrose are shining upon the mossy bank, and the sweet violet is hiding its pretty blue head among its dark green leaves ; the little birds are singing in the hedges, and every thing seems happy ;-let, us be happy too, my dear children, and let us thank the good God, who has given us so many pleasures.”

« AnteriorContinuar »