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Sheridan

405 Tono Maria Botocudo,' the Indian 246
Ship of war getting under way 268 Tooth-drawing, Dr. Monsey's mode 167
Shipwreck, Cochelet's
185 Tourists

330
Shows of London

246, 475 Traditional tales, by Allan Cuooingham 449
Sicily, letter from
129 Traitor pool

90
Silver mine of Zellerfeld
350 Tree of Kebyrbor

150
Sketches of society

423, 475 Travels in the Holy Land 232, 253, 289
Slave trade, increase of
52 Turbans, origin of

327
Smugglers
344 Tyrolese girl, ecdote of

47
Soliman, present pacha of Acre

238
Spain, letier from

155
Spanish revolutionary chieftains 80 Unicorn of Holy Writ

126
Speaker Onslow
84 Universal traveller

288
Specifics, reputed

167
Spider thread

483
Spinning and weaving

447 Valley of Jehosaphat in Jerusalem 299
Sporting, East - Indian
46 Vasco de Gama

283
Spree and bull-hank
423 Vegetables, Phillips' history of

69
Stars, occultation of
168 Vernon, admiral

225
Stael, Madame de
413 Vince, Archdeacon

488
Steam engines of England
127 Vocal music, Dr. Kitchiner on

280
Steam boats
394 Voice from St. Helena

340, 411
Stephens, Alexander
488 Voyage of discovery

207
Stepheusiana

85, 123, 201, 363
Steward of Balacholish

221
Stewart, the pedestrian

303 Waddington's travels in Ethiopia 394
Storm-ship, by Geoffrey Crayon, Gent. 214 Wakefield, Gilbert

204
Strada Molo of Naples
358 Waldegrave, lord

223
Strawberries, a cure for the gout 445 Walking Stewart

303
Sultan Mahmoud,the present grand seig Walker, Adam

488
235 Walpole's Postbhumous MSS. 222, 278
Sultan of Turkey, titles of
285 Waliers, John

488
Superstition
205, 184 Washington, general

123
Suspicious husband, play of
442 Washington, Canova's statue of

127
Sweet basil, vegetable
118 Washington, original letter from

209
Swine-feeding at New Forest

410 Waterloo, battle of, Buonaparte's opio-
Switzerland, tour in
34 ion of

345
Weaver's reeds

447
Weber, Anselm

488
Tales of the Manor
448 Weddings at Athens

233
Talleyrand
417 Western, Charles Callis

403
Temperature of rooms
167 West-India islands

405
Tendrils, a poem
402 Whalley and Goffe

45
Thames, E. I. ship, loss of

248 White (Henry Kirke) new volume of
The fight
75 his works

401
The smuggler
95 Wickliff, the reformer

48
The king of the peak
135 Wieland's rose in January

178
The great St. Bernard
72 Willes, chief justice

295
The rose in January
177 Witches, and other night fears

31
The page faithful to death

272
Women

107
The Quakers

485
Wooden artillery

442
The mother's dream, a traditional tale 449
Thelwall's poems

121
Thurston, John
488 Zodiac of Denderah

446
Toleration

202

nor

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Earl March look'd on his dying child 429 Poetic sketches

241
Primrose, to the

10
Primrose, the

177
Fast by thy stream, 0 Babylon reclining 122
Fresher green the lawns display 145
Freedom returos, O let me enjoy it 144 Reminiscence

347
From wealthy Ormus' pearly bed

184
From his brimstone bed

408
Shun delays, they breed remorse

88
Simplicity

184
Ginevra
74 Soldiers ! soldiers ! hear

81
Green river
319 Song

122
Sonnet to a roasted pig

448
Song, by Clare

368
Hail lovely land : from cliffs where win Song by Campbell

429
ter reigos
116 Song, the last rose of summer

481
Hast thou a sorrow ? come tell it to me 402 Song

144
Harp. of the north, that mouldering long Song of the angels of the air

309
hath hung
125 Songs, by Mrs. Opie

448
Heleo Grame
37 Song

274
Heaven speed the righteous sword 348 Spectre-boat, a ballad, by Campbell 441
Higher, higher will we climb

348 Spring, hyma
to

134
Hope deferred
:22 Spring

145
How dear to this heart are the scenes of Sianzas op Chantry's monument 154
my childbood
331 Summer morning, by Clare

315
How blest the pilgrim
349 Sylva, charms of

223
Hymn to Spring, by Clare

134
Take, oh take those lips away

200
Ichabod

83 Tell me not, sweet, I am unkinde 200
I dreamt not what it was to woo 42 The palms flung down their shadow, and
If when the sparkling goblet flows 122 the air

241
In gurgling eddies roli'd the tide 144 The garlands fade that spring su lately
In every clime, from Lapland to Japan 402

251
I saw it in my evening walk
177 The diver

910
It lay mid trees, a little quiet nest 241 The morning hours the sun beguiles 368

The poet's lot

243

There is a pale and shrinking flower 213
Joyful words, we meet again
348 The rose

051
The bee

95?

The cocks have now the morn foretold 315
Know'st thon the land where citrons The stars were shining brightly

306
scent the gale
144 Tbe winter flower

943
The mariger of life

213
The fisher

144
Lament
275 The diamond in its native bed

24
Lines by an American
331 The night-blowing stock

59
Lines by Schiller
368 The tumult of battle is o'er

83
Lines--I sat in my bower

408 Thougbts and images, by Montgomery 24
Lipes by Barton
242 Thou virgin bliss, the seasons bring

131
Linger, brief winter-sun, awhile 243 'Tis not the liquid brightness of those
Live with me and be my love

199
eyes

923
Loss in delays
88 To May

90
Love's witchcraft
145 To a stream

109
Love's last words

481
To Bacchus, dear Bacchus

145
Lucasta going to war

200 To a water-fowl

Wove

$19

Meet again

Mark in yonder thorpy vale
10 Vale Crucis, by Roscoe

115
Maiden, look me in the face

145 Vale of the Cross, the shepherds tell 115
348 Via crucis, via lucis, by Montgomery

348
Moral reflections from the Cross of St.
Paul's

481
Mount St. Micbael, prisoners of 242 War song, by Montgomery

342
What is life

310

When breezes are soft and skies are fair 318
No not tbe eye of tender blue

122 Where are ye with whoin in life I started 317
When the young mariner of life

243
Whither, tell me, stream

109
Old Nick's Promenade
408 Whither, 'midst falling dew

319
One kiss more

106 Who's here of noble or of vassal blood 310
Othat I were the fragrant flower that Why ask me the cause of my sorrow 416
kisses

402

Pilot's song

Pilgrimage of life

Youth, manhood, and age, by Montgom-
306
ery

347
319 Youth, aspirations of

949

SPIRIT

OF TAE

ENGLISH MAGAZINES.

BOSTON, APRIL 1, 1822.

(London Time's Telescope, for April, 1822.)

April.

Now Nature, to her Maker's mandate true, ingale in his beautiful and truly Ana-
Calls Spring's impartial heralds to the view.
Behold how lovely shine the gems of rain,

creontic Odes :-
Like sparkling diamonds on the glitt'ring plain ; In shrubs which skirt the scented mead,
How hanging on the flow'ring shrubs they blaze, Or garden's walk embroidered gay,
And dart beneath the leaves their silver rays. Can the sweet voice of joy be found

Unless to harmonize the shade,
Such is the general character of The Nightingale's soft warbled lay

Pours melting melody around. April ; yet we have sometimes verp sharp frosts in this month as well The Persian writers frequently comas in its successor, May. In the high- pare their poets to nightingales; and, er tracts of Persia, the balmy season of indeed, Hafez has acquired the conSpring advances with singular rapidity. stant appellation of the Persian NightDuring the months of April and May, ingale; to this the bard alludes in his every mountain's brow is covered with sixth ode, as translated by Nott. The rich herbage, and the air is filled with beautiful fiction of the Asiatic poets, perfume from the full-blown flowers of that the nightingale is enamoured of the numberless gardens : the whole the rose, has been noticed in the Introcountry puts on its fairest garb, looking duction to our last volume (p. xliv); enchantingly, and breathing sweets Hafez, speaking of our eagerness to from every quarter.

enjoy the pleasures of the Spring, beauThe love-laboured song of the night- tifully observes,' We drop, like nightingale is occasionally heard in the day. ingales, into the nest of the rose.' time in England, and all day in the Again, in his seventh ode, he says, East, and in some parts of Europe. : O Hafez, thou desirest, like the nightAn English traveller of the seventeenth ingales, the presence of the rose : let century, writing from Shiraz, and in- thy very soul be a ransom for the earth, spired by the climate, says, the vight- where the keeper of the rose-garden ingale, sweet harbinger of light, is a

walks ! In the eighth ode, also, we constant cheerer of these

have the following

groves ; charming, with its warbling strains, the The youthful senson's wonted bloom heaviest soul into a pleasing ecstacy.' Renews the beauty of each bow'r, The Persian poet, Hafez, a native of

And to the sweet-songed bird is come Shiraz, repeatedly alludes to the night

Glad welcome from its darling flow's.

In the sixth stanza of the ninth ode, 2 ATHENEUM VOL. 11.

the hard again alludes to this favourite

fiction, which, literally translated, would breathes out her life in one last effort, stand thus : · When the rose rides in and drops upon the instrument which the air, like Solomon*, the bird of had contributed to her defeat. morn comes forth with the melody of That nightingales have often been David. In Ode XIII, on the return entranced through the effect of instruof Spring, we are presented with the mental musick, appears from Bourdefollowing beautiful stanza on the same lot's Histoire de la Musique.' Nothsubject :

ing is more common (he observes) than

to see the nightingales, at particular The love-struck nightingale's delightful strain, The lark's resounding note are heard again ;

seasons, assemble in a wood, when they Again the rose, to hail Spring's festive day,

hear the sound of certain instruments, From the cold house of sorrow hastes away. or of a fine voice, which they endea

Sir William Ouseley, who resided vour to answer by their warblings, with for some time at Shiraz in the year

such violent efforts, that I have (he 1811, says that he passed many hours continues) beheld some of them fall, as in listening to the melody of the night- if entranced, at the feet of a person ingales that abounded in the gardens in who possessed what is called a "nightthe vicinity of this city; and he was as- ingale throat,' to express the flexibility sured by persons of credit that several of a fine voice. Bourdelot adds, that, of these birds had expired while con frequently, both nightingales and lintending with musicians in the loudness nets, perched even on the handles of or variety of their notes. Sir William lutes, guitars, and other instruments Jones records a a similar contest, not with which it was usual for persons, mortal, but of extraordinary result. about a century since, to amuse themAn intelligent Persian, who repeated selves at the Tuileries, in Paris, in the

month of May. his story again and again, and permitted Sir William to write it down from

The primrose now (primula veris) his lips, declared, that he had more peeps from beneath the hedges. than once been present when a celebrated lutanist, Mirza Mohammed, surnamed Bulbul (nightingale), was play

Mark in yonder thorny vale,

Fearless of the falling snows, 'ing to a large company in a grove near Careless of the chilly gale, Shiraz, where he distinctly saw the Passing sweet the Primrose blows: nightingales trying to vie with the mu

Milder gales and warmer beams sician ; sometimes warbling on the

May the gaudier flow'rets rear, trees, sometimes fluttering from branch But to me the Primrose seems to branch, as if they wished to ap Proudest gem that decks the year. proach the instrument whence the me

Darling flow'r ! like thee, may I, lody proceeded ; and, at length, drop Dauntless view the tempest rise, ping on the ground in a kind of ecsta Danger neither court nor fly, sy from which they were soon raised,

Fortune's bleakest blasts despise ; by a change of the mode.

Oppression's threats regardless hear, In confirmation of the Persian re Nor past regret nor future fear. port given by Sir William Ouseley, it may be mentioned, that, according to

APRIL 1.-ALL Or Auld fools' DAY.

Formerly on this day every body strove Pliny (Nat. His. lib. xc, 29), in vocal trials among nightingales, the vanquish with ridiculous absurdities. Fools, in

to make as many fools as they could ed bird terminated its song only with the modern or dramatic sense, were its life ; and Strada (lib. ii, prolus. vi) known in the church, and called also supposes the spirit of emulation so the Vice. powerful in the nightingale, that, hav- ard the Third say,

Shakspeare makes Riching strained her little throat, vainly en

Thus, like the formal Vice, Iniquity, deavouring to excel the musician, she

I moralize two meanings in one word. Act 3, sc. 1.

TO THE PRIMROSE.

* The Comparison of the beauty of a flower to the richness of King Solomon's attire, was, perhaps, a favourite figure among the Eastern writers, and may be found in holy writ. (Luke xii. 27.)

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