Crime and Everyday Life

Front Cover
SAGE, Jan 28, 2002 - 211 pages
2 Reviews

Previous editions of Crime and Everyday Life have been popular with students and instructors for Felson’s clear, concise writing style and his unique approach to crime causation. The Third Edition has been thoroughly revised and updated throughout, and includes, among other changes, new chapters on white-collar crime and the use of technology in crime control. By emphasizing that routine everyday activities set the stage for illegal activities (i.e. stolen goods sold in a legal business setting), Felson challenges the conventional wisdom and offers a unique perspective and novel solutions for reducing crime. Students in introductory criminology and criminal justice courses will discover that simple and inexpensive changes in the physical environment and patterns of everyday activity can often produce substantial decreases in crime rates. Insightful, yet fun to read, this new edition of Crime and Everyday Life is sure to provoke students to look at the causes and control of crime with a fresh perspective...and renewed hope.

 

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Contents

Ten Fallacies About Crime
1
2 The CopsandCourts Fallacy
3
3 The NotMe Fallacy
6
4 The InnocentYouth Fallacy
7
5 The Ingenuity Fallacy
9
6 The OrganizedCrime Fallacy
10
7 The JuvenileGang Fallacy
11
8 The WelfareState Fallacy
12
Schools and Crime
84
The Central Role of School Size
86
Parental Trials and Errors
88
Conclusion
91
WhiteCollar Crime
93
What WhiteCollar Crime Really Is
94
How Specialized Access Permits Crime
98
Conclusion
102

9 The Agenda Fallacy
14
10 The WhateverYouThink Fallacy
17
Conclusion
18
Projects and Challenges
19
Chemistry for Crime
20
The Elements of a Criminal Act
21
Calming the Waters and Looking After Places
27
Hot Products
28
Craving Violent Targets
32
The General Chemistry of Crime
33
Conclusion
34
Main Points
35
Crime Decisions
37
How Offender Decisions Respond to Controls
40
Making Sense of Crimes That Seem Irrational
44
Social Roles Ties and Crime
47
Conclusion
50
Projects and Challenges
51
Bringing Crime to You
52
Life and Crime in the Convergent City
53
Crime and the Divergent Metropolis
57
Real Life Outgrows Four Stages
59
Population Density Shifts and Crime Patterns
61
Concentrated Advantage for Committing Crime
65
Conclusion
67
Main Points
68
Marketing Stolen Goods
70
The Thief and the Public
71
Inviting People to Steal More
73
Its Easier to Sell Stolen Goods to the Poor
74
Conclusion
76
Main Points
77
Crime Growth and Youth Activities
79
The Changing Position of Youth
80
Adolescent Circulation and Crime Involvement
83
Main Points
103
One Crime Feeds Another
105
The Interplay of Illegal Markets
106
Quick Links Among Offenses
108
Crime Links in Local Settings
110
The System Dynamics of Crime
116
Conclusion
117
Main Points
118
Local Design Against Crime
120
Important Ideas for Designing Out Crime
121
A Larger Field
122
Residential Crime Prevention
129
Other Methods for Designing Out Crime
135
Conclusion
142
Projects and Challenges
143
Situational Crime Prevention
144
Situational Prevention and Crime Science
145
Preventing Property Crime
146
Preventing Violent Crime
153
Preventing Drunk Driving
159
Preventing Fraud
160
Preventing Repeat Victimization
161
Conclusion
162
Main Points
163
Crime Science and Everyday Life
165
Criminology in Transition
168
The Challenge of Crime Science
169
Many Ways to Learn About Crime
171
Conclusion
175
Appendix
177
References
179
Index
202
About the Author
211
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Marcus Felson is the originator of the routine activity approach and of Crime and Everyday Life. He has also authored Crime and Nature, and serves as Professor at Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas.  He has a B.A. from University of Chicago, an M.A. and  Ph.D. from the Univeristy of Michigan, and has received the 2014 Honoris Causa from the Universidad Miguel Hernandez in  Spain.  Professor Felson has been given the Ronald Clarke Award by the Environmental Criminology and Crime Analysis group, and the Paul Tappan Award of the Western Society of Criminology. He has been a guest lecturer in Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Denmark, El Salvador, England, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Hungary, Itlay, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand,  Norway, Poland, Scotland, Spain, South Africa, Sweden and Switzerland. He has applied routine activity thinking to many topics, including theft, violence, child molesting, white collar crime, and corruption.

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