The Works of Alexander Popekesq., with Notes and Illustrations by Himself and Others: To which Were Added, a New Life of the Author, an Estimate of His Poetical Character and Writings, and Occasional Remarks, Volumen10

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C. and J. Rivington, 1824
 

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Página 182 - If we have sown unto you spiritual things, is it a great thing if we shall reap your carnal things?
Página 17 - Westward the course of empire takes its way; The four first acts already past, A fifth shall close the drama with the day : Time's noblest offspring is the last.
Página 524 - ... you have made my system as clear as I ought to have done, and could not. It is indeed the same system as mine, but illustrated with a ray of your own, as they say our natural body is the same still when it is glorified. I am sure I like it better than I did before, and so will every man else. I know I meant just what you explain ; but I did not explain my own meaning so well as you. You understand me as well as I do myself; .but you express me better than I could express myself.
Página 235 - I will further tell you, that all my endeavours, from a boy, to distinguish myself, were only for want of a great title and fortune, that I might be used like a Lord by those who have an opinion of my parts — whether right or wrong, it is no great matter, and so the reputation of wit or great learning does the office of a blue ribbon, or of a coach and six horses.
Página 266 - Fenton, before y" came ; but stay'd to have inform'd myself & you of ye circumstances of it. All I hear is, that he felt a Gradual Decay, tho' so early in Life, & was declining for 5 or 6 months. It was not, as I apprehended, the Gout in his Stomach, but I believe rather a Complication first of Gross...
Página 130 - I like the scheme of our meeting after distresses and dispersions ; but the chief end I propose to myself in all my labors is to vex the world rather than divert it ; and if I could compass that design without hurting my own person or fortune, I would be the most indefatigable writer you have ever seen, without reading.
Página 94 - As to what is called a revolution principle, my opinion was this ; that whenever those evils which usually attend and follow a violent change of government, were not in probability so pernicious as the grievance we suffer under a present power, then the publick good will justify such a revolution...
Página 290 - God knows, she is extremely weak : the slow fever works under, and mines the constitution ; we keep it off sometimes, but still it returns, and makes new breaches before nature can repair the old ones. I am not ashamed to say to you, that I admire her more every hour of my life : death is not to her the King of Terrors ; she beholds him without the least. When she suffers much, she wishes for him as a deliverer from pain ; when life is tolerable, she looks on him with dislike, because he is to separate...
Página 232 - I remember when I was a little boy I felt a great fish at the end of my line which I drew up almost on the ground, but it dropped in, and the disappointment vexes me to this very day, and I believe \ it was the type of all my future disappointments.
Página 16 - The Muse, disgusted at an age and clime Barren of every glorious theme, In distant lands now waits a better time, Producing subjects worthy fame : In happy climes, where, from the genial sun And virgin earth, such scenes ensue, The force of Art by Nature seems outdone, And fancied beauties by the true : In happy climes, the seat of innocence, Where Nature guides, and Virtue rules, Where men shall not impose, for truth and sense, The...

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