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"Then Plato's words of light in thee and me
Lingered like moonlight in the moonless east,
For we had just then read-thy memory
"Is faithful now-the story of the feast;
And Agathon and Diotima seemed
From death and dark forgetfulness released.

FRAGMENT III.

"TWAS at the season when the Earth upsprings From slumber, as a spherèd angel's child, Shadowing its eyes with green and golden wings,

Stands up before its mother bright and mild,
Of whose soft voice the air expectant seems-
So stood before the sun, which shone and smiled

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To see it rise thus joyous from its dreams,
The fresh and radiant Earth. The hoary grove
Waxed green and flowers burst forth like starry beams;-

The grass in the warm sun did start and move,
And sea-buds burst beneath the waves serene :-
How many a one, though none be near to love,
Loves then the shade of his own soul, half seen
In any mirror-or the spring's young minions,
The winged leaves amid the copses green;-
How many a spirit then puts on the pinions
Of fancy, and outstrips the lagging blast,
And his own steps-and over wide dominions.
Sweeps in his dream-drawn chariot, far and fast,
More fleet than storms-the wide world shrinks below, 20
When winter and despondency are past.

'Twas at this season that Prince Athanase
Past the white Alps-those eagle-baffling mountains
Slept in their shrouds of snow;-beside the ways
The waterfalls were voiceless-for their fountains
Were changed to mines of sunless crystal now,
Or by the curdling winds-like brazen wings

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Which clanged along the mountain's marble brow,
Warped into adamantine fretwork, hung
And filled with frozen light the chasm below.

FRAGMENT IV.

THOU art the wine whose drunkenness is all
We can desire, O Love and happy souls,
Ere from thy vine the leaves of autumn fall,
Catch thee, and feed from their o'erflowing bowls
Thousands who thirst for thy ambrosial dew;-
Thou art the radiance which where ocean rolls
Investest it; and when the heavens are blue
Thou fillest them; and when the earth is fair
The shadow of thy moving wings imbue

Its desarts and its mountains, till they wear
Beauty like some bright robe;-thou ever soarest
Among the towers of men, and as soft air

In spring, which moves the unawakened forest,
Clothing with leaves its branches bare and bleak,
Thou floatest among men; and aye implorest

FRAGMENT OF A LATER PART.

HER hair was brown, her spherèd eyes were brown,
And in their dark and liquid moisture swam,
Like the dim orb of the eclipsèd moon;

Yet when the spirit flashed beneath, there came
The light from them, as when tears of delight
Double the western planet's serene flame.

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That which from thee they should implore:-the weak
Alone kneel to thee, offering up the hearts

The strong have broken-yet where shall any seek
A garment whom thou clothest not?

MARLOW, 1817.

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LINES.

I.

THE cold earth slept below,

Above the cold sky shone;
And all around, with a chilling sound,
From caves of ice and fields of snow,
The breath of night like death did flow
Beneath the sinking moon.

II.

The wintry hedge was black,

The green grass was not seen,
The birds did rest on the bare thorn's breast,
Whose roots, beside the pathway track,
Had bound their folds o'er many a crack,
Which the frost had made between.
III.

Thine eyes glowed in the glare
Of the moon's dying light;

As a fenfire's beam on a sluggish stream,
Gleams dimly, so the moon shone there,
And it yellowed the strings of thy raven hair,
That shook in the wind of night.

IV.

The moon made thy lips pale, beloved-
The wind made thy bosom chill-

The night did shed on thy dear head
Its frozen dew, and thou didst lie
Where the bitter breath of the naked sky
Might visit thee at will.

DEATH.

I.

DEATH is here and death is there,
Death is busy everywhere,
All around, within, beneath,
Above is death-and we are death.

II.

Death has set his mark and seal
On all we are and all we feel,
On all we know and all we fear,

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III.

First our pleasures die-and then
Our hopes, and then our fears-and when
These are dead, the debt is due,
Dust claims dust-and we die too.

IV.

All things that we love and cherish,
Like ourselves must fade and perish,
Such is our rude mortal lot-
Love itself would, did they not.

LINES.
I.

THAT time is dead for ever, child,
Drowned, frozen, dead for ever!

We look on the past
And stare aghast

At the spectres wailing, pale and ghast,
Of hopes which thou and I beguiled
To death on life's dark river.

II.

The stream we gazed on then, rolled by;
Its waves are unreturning;

But we yet stand

In a lone land,

Like tombs to mark the memory

Of hopes and fears, which fade and flee
In the light of life's dim morning.

DEATH.
I.

THEY die-the dead return not-Misery

Sits near an open grave and calls them over,

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" THE SUN IS WARM, THE SKY IS CLEAR."

A Youth with hoary hair and haggard eye

They are the names of kindred, friend and lover, Which he so feebly calls-they all are gone! Fond wretch, all dead, those vacant names alone, This most familiar scene, my painThese tombs alone remain.

II.

Misery, my sweetest friend-oh! weep no more!
Thou wilt not be consoled-I wonder not!
For I have seen thee from thy dwelling's door

Watch the calm sunset with them, and this spot
Was even as bright and calm, but transitory,
And now thy hopes are gone, thy hair is hoary;
This most familiar scene, my pain-
These tombs alone remain.

SONG, ON A FADED VIOLET.

I.

THE odour from the flower is gone

Which like thy kisses breathed on me;
The colour from the flower is flown

Which glowed of thee and only thee!

II.

A shrivelled, lifeless, vacant form,
It lies on my abandoned breast,
And mocks the heart which yet is warm,
With cold and silent rest.

III.

I weep,-my tears revive it not!

I sigh, it breathes no more on me;
Its mute and uncomplaining lot
Is such as mine should be.

STANZAS.

WRITTEN IN DEJECTION, NEAR NAPLES.
I.

THE sun is warm, the sky is clear,
The waves are dancing fast and bright,

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