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LXII.

"Or turn their wealth to arms, and make War for thy beloved sake

On wealth, and war, and fraud-whence they Drew the power which is their prey.

LXIII.

Science, Poetry and Thought

Are thy lamps; they make the lot
Of the dwellers in a cot

So serene, they curse it not.

LXIV.

"Spirit, Patience, Gentleness,
All that can adorn and bless
Art thou-let deeds not words express
Thine exceeding loveliness.

LXV.

"Let a great Assembly be

Of the fearless and the free

On some spot of English ground
Where the plains stretch wide around.

LXVI.

"Let the blue sky overhead,

The green earth on which ye tread,
All that must eternal be

Witness the solemnity.

LXVII.
"From the corners uttermost
Of the bounds of English coast;
From every hut, village and town
Where those who live and suffer moan
For others' misery or their own,

LXVIII.

"From the workhouse and the prison
Where pale as corpses newly risen,
Women, children, young and old
Groan for pain, and weep for cold-

LXIX.

"From the haunts of daily life
Where is waged the daily strife

With common wants and common cares
Which sows the human heart with tares-

LXX.

"Lastly from the palaces
Where the murmur of distress
Echoes, like the distant sound
Of a wind alive around

LXXI.

"Those prison halls of wealth and fashion
Where some few feel such compassion
For those who groan, and toil, and wail
As must make their brethren pale-

LXXII.

"Ye who suffer woes untold,
Or to feel, or to behold

Your lost country bought and sold
With a price of blood and gold—

LXXIII.

"Let a vast assembly be,
And with great solemnity
Declare with measured words that ye
Are, as God has made ye, free-

LXXIV.

"Be your strong and simple words
Keen to wound as sharpened swords,
And wide as targes let them be,
With their shade to cover ye.

LXXV.

"Let the tyrants pour around
With a quick and startling sound,
Like the loosening of a sea,
Troops of armed emblazonry.

LXXVI.

"Let the charged artillery drive
Till the dead air seems alive
With the clash of clanging wheels,
And the tramp of horses' heels.

LXXVII.

"Let the fixèd bayonet.
Gleam with sharp desire to wet
Its bright point in English blood
Looking keen as one for food.

LXXVIII.

"Let the horsemen's scymitars
Wheel and flash, like sphereless stars
Thirsting to eclipse their burning
In a sea of death and mourning.

LXXIX.

"Stand ye calm and resolute, Like a forest close and mute,

With folded arms and looks which are Weapons of an unvanquished war,

LXXX.

"And let Panic, who outspeeds
The career of armed steeds
Pass, a disregarded shade
Thro' your phalanx undismayed.

LXXXI.

"Let the laws of your own land,
Good or ill, between ye stand
Hand to hand, and foot to foot,
Arbiters of the dispute,

LXXXII.

"The old laws of England-they
Whose reverend heads with age are grey,
Children of a wiser day;

And whose solemn voice must be
Thine own echo-Liberty!

LXXXIII.

"On those who first should violate
Such sacred heralds in their state
Rest the blood that must ensue,
And it will not rest on you.

LXXXIV.

"And if then the tyrants dare
Let them ride among you there,
Slash, and stab, and maim, and hew,-
What they like, that let them do.

LXXXV.

"With folded arms and steady eyes,
And little fear, and less surprise
Look upon them as they slay
Till their rage has died away.

LXXXVI.

"Then they will return with shame
To the place from which they came,
And the blood thus shed will speak
In hot blushes on their cheek.

LXXXVII.

"Every woman in the land
Will point at them as they stand-
They will hardly dare to greet
Their acquaintance in the street.

LXXXVIII.

"And the bold, true warriors
Who have hugged Danger in wars.
Will turn to those who would be free
Ashamed of such base company.

LXXXIX.

"And that slaughter to the Nation
Shall steam up like inspiration,
Eloquent, oracular;

A volcano heard afar.

XC.

"And these words shall then become
Like oppression's thundered doom
Ringing thro' each heart and brain,
Heard again-again—again—

XCI.

"Rise like Lions after slumber
In unvanquishable number-
Shake your chains to earth like dew
Which in sleep had fallen on you-
Ye are many-they are few."

REJECTED STANZA OF THE MASK OF ANARCHY (BETWEEN STANZAS XLIX AND L).

Horses, oxen, have a home,
When from daily toil they come;
Household dogs, when the wind roars,
Find a home within warm doors.

PETER BELL THE THIRD.

BY

MICHING MALLECHO, ESQ.

Is it a party in a parlour,

Crammed just as they on earth were crammed,
Some sipping punch-some sipping tea;
But, as you by their faces see,
All silent, and all-damned!

Peter Bell, by W. WORDSWORTH

OPHELIA. What means this, my lord?
HAMLET.-Marry, this is Miching Mallecho; it means mischief.

SHAKSPEARE.

DEDICATION.

TO THOMAS BROWN, ESQ., THE YOUNGER, H.F.

DEAR TOM,

Allow me to request you to introduce Mr. Peter Bell to the respectable family of the Fudges; although he may fall short of those very considerable personages in the more active properties which characterize the Rat and the Apostate, I suspect that even you, their historian, will confess that he surpasses them in the more peculiarly legitimate qualification of intolerable dulness.

You know Mr. Examiner Hunt; well-it was he who presented me to two of the Mr. Bells. My intimacy with the younger Mr. Bell naturally sprung from this introduction to his brothers. And in presenting him to you, I have the satisfaction of being able to assure you that he is considerably the dullest of the three.

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