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BRUTUS.

Well then, hear it all,

PORTIA.
Hold, dearest BRUTUS!
I dare not hear it yet ; I'll try this first.

[She stabs herself in the Arm.

BRUTUS Hold, what d'ye mean?

PORTIA.

To try my Fortitude. For tho' I durst have trusted my firm Mind With any thing which but concern'd my self; Where you're engag’d, it was too great a venture : I doubt my firmeft Thoughts, while you suspect them.

BRUTUS. Oh, Wonder of thy Sex! Gods! make me worthy of this matchless Woman! Hafte, haste, and let thy Wound be quickly dress’d. Within I'll tell thee all, And in thy Bofom pour my very Soul.

[Exit PORTIA,

Enter LUCIUS.

LUCIUS.
A Messenger, my Lord, from mighty CÆSAR

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Is sent to summon you, and Caius CASSIUS,
About some weighey matter presently.

[Exit LUCIUS.

BRUTUS
From CÆSAR ? and my Brother CASSIUS too?
An early summons this! We are betray'd,
Loft and undone, yet less in our own ruin,
Than in the letting him escape. Oh Rome,
Thou hast in vain depended on thy BRUTUS!
But I will go, left my delaying now
Should raise Suspicion ; and if all's discover'd,
My Life is useless, and not worth my Care.

[Exeunt.

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Between the

second and third Act, these Verses are to be sung by a Person representing the Genius of Rome.

Second CHORUS.
O, to prevent this mighty Empire's Doom,

From bright unknown Abodes of Bliss I come,
The Awful Genius of Majestick Rome.
Great is her Danger: but I will engage
Some few, the Master-Souls of all this Age,
To do an Act of just Heroic Rage.

S2

'Tis

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'Tis hard, a Man so great, should fall so low; More hard, to let so brave a People bow To one themselves have rais’d, who scorns them now.

Yet oh, I grieve, that Brutus should be stain'd;
Whose Life, excepting this one Act, remain'd
So pure, that future times will think it feign'd.

But only he can make the rest combine ;
The very Life, and Soul of their Design;
The Centre, where those mighty Spirits join.

Unthinking Men no sort of Scruples make ;
Others do ill, only for Mischief's sake;
But ev'n the best are guilty by Mistake.

Thus some, for Envy, or Revenge, intend
To bring the bold Usurper to his end;
But for his Country, BRUTUS ftabs his Friend.

АСТ.

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ACT III. SCENE I.
The Scene is CÆSAR's Apartment, where he appears

Undress'd.

A

CESAR.
MBITION, Oh thou Tyrant of my Soul.!

How much a gentler Lord am I to Rome,
Than thou to me! I am the only Slave.
This Day was dully spent in publick Sports,
Things too magnificent for true Delight.
Joy dwells in silent Shades, and private Pleasures ;
In Peace, and not in Pomp: then, my long Nights,
Those precious Hours design’d for soft Repose,
Are by unruly Cares thus ravish'd from me.

Enter JUNIUS.

JUNIUS.
BRUTUS and CASSIUS attend your Pleasure.

CÆSAR.
I tell thee, JUNIUS, my trusty Freed-man,
That melancholic CASSIUS needs observing,
If e’er I could be capable of Fear,

S 3

I think it would be of that pensive CASSIUS.
He loves not Learning, no not Poetry ;
Nor is his sullen Humour pleas'd with Musick.
When others laugh, he so demurely smiles,
As if he thought it meanness to be merry.
Seldom he likes what others most approve,
And loves to praise what all Men else dislike.
Such Men as he are never at their ease,
While they behold a greater than themselves.
Yet he is brave, and shall have due Preferment.

[Exit JUNIUS.

SCENE II.
Enter BRUTUS and CASSIUS,

CÆSAR.
You seem amaz’d at such an early Summons ;
I have not dept all Night.

CASSIUS.

On what account !

CÆSAR.
'Tis only what I suffer from my Cares.
But my unquiet Mind should not disturb
Such noble Romans, had you not been both
Nearly concern'd in what I have to say.

CAS

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