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GR A T IT U D E.

BY THE SA M E.

Wmen all thy mercies, O My God!

My rising foul surveys; Transported with the view, I'm loft

In wonder, love, and praife!

O! how shall words with equal warmth

The gratitude declare,
That glows within my ravish'd heart

But thou canst read it there.

Thy providence my life fustainid,

And all my wants redrest, When in the filent womb I lay,

And hung upon the breast.

To all my weak complaints and cries,

Thy mercy lent an ear,
Ere yet my feeble thoughts had learnt

To form themselves in pray’r.

Unnumber'd comforts to my soul

Thy tender care bestow'd, Before my infant heart conceiv'd

From whom those comforts flow'd.

When in the lipp'ry paths of youth

With heedless steps I ran,
Thine arm, unseen, convey'd me fafe,

And lod me up to man.

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Through hidden dangers, toils, and deaths,

It gently clear'd my way,
And through the pleasing snares of vice,

More to be fear'd than they.

When worn with sickness, oft hast thou

With health renew'd my face,
And when in fins and sorrows suik,

Reviv'd my soul with grace.

Thy bounteous hand with worldly bliss

Has made my cup run o'er,
And in a kind and faithful friend

Has doubled all my store.

Ten thousand thousand precious gifts

My daily thanks employ,
Nor is the least a cheerful heart,

That tastes those gifts with joy.

Through every period of my life

Thy goodness I'll pursue;
And after death, in distant worlds
The glorious theme renew.

H

When nature fails, and day and night

Divide thy works no more,
My ever-grateful heart, O Lord !

Thy mercy shall adore.

Through all eternity to thee

A joyful fong I'll raise, For, oh! eternity's too short

To utter all thy praise.

C R Ε Α Τ Ι ο Ν.

B 7 THE SAME.

The lofty pillars of sky,
And spacious concave rais'd on high,
Spangled with stars, a shining frame,
Their great original proclaim ;
Th’unwearied sun, from day to day,
Pours knowledge on his golden ray,
And publishes to every land
The work of an almighty hand.

Soon as th’ev’ning shades prevail,
The moon takes up the wondrous tale,
And nightly to the lift'ning earth
Repeats the story of her birth:

Whilft all the stars, that round her burn,
And all the planets in their turi,
Confirm the tidings as they roll,
And spread the truth from, pole to pole.

What though, in folemn filence, all
Move round the dark terrestrial ball?
What though nor real voice nor sound
Amid their radiant orbs be found?
In reason's ear they all rejoice,
And utter forth a glorious voice,
For ever finging, as they thine,
or The hand that made us is divine."

A WINTER PIECE.

ADDRESSED TO THE DUKE OF DORSET.

BY PHILIPS.

From frozen climes, and endless tracts of snow,
From streams that northern winds forbid to flow;
What present shall the muse to Dorset bring,
Or how, so near the pole, attempt to sing?
The hoary winter here conceals from fight,
All pleasing objects that to erse invite.
The hills and dales, and the delightful woods,
The flow'ry plains, and silver-streaming floods,

By snow difguis'd in bright confusion lie,
And with one dazzling waste fatigue the eye.

No gentle-breathing breeze prepares the spring,
No birds within the desert region sing.
The ships unmov'd the boist'rous winds defy,
While rattling charives o'er the ocean fiy.
The vast leviathan wants room to play,
And spout his waters in the face of day,
The starving wolves along the main sea prowl,
And to the moon in icy valles howl.
For many a shining league the level main
Here spreads itself into a glasly plain :
There folid billows of enormous size,
Mhips of green ice in wild disorder rise,

And yet but lately have I seen ev'n here, The winter in a lovely dress appear. E'er yet the cloucis let fall the treasur'd snow, Or winds begun through hazy skies to blow. At ev'ning a keen eastern breeze arose; And the descending rain unfully'd froze. Soon as the filent shades of night withdrew, The ruddy morn disclos'd at once to view The face of nature in a rich disguise, And brighten'd ev'ry object to my eyes: For ev'ry shrub, and ev'ry blade of grass, And ev'ry pointed thorn, seem'd wrought in glass; In pearls and rubies rich the hawthorns show, While through the ice the crimson berries glow.

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