Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

THE WORLD'S WANDERERS.

I.

Tell me, thou star, whose wings of light
Speed thee in thy fiery flight,
In what cavern of the night

Will thy pinions close now?

[blocks in formation]

ART thou pale for weariness
Of climbing heaven and gazing on the earth,

Wandering companionless
Among the stars that have a different birth, -
And ever changing, like a joyless eye
That finds no object worth its constancy?

5

[blocks in formation]

Ye hasten to the grave ! What seek ye there,
Ye restless thoughts and busy purposes
Of the idle brain, which the world's livery wear?
O thou quick heart which pantest to possess
All that pale Expectation feigneth fair !

5

IO

Thou vainly curious mind which wouldest guess
Whence thou didst come, and whither thou must go,
And all that never yet was known would know
Oh, whither hasten ye, that thus ye press,
With such swift feet life's green and pleasant path,
Seeking, alike from happiness and woe,
A refuge in the cavern of gray death?
O heart, and mind, and thoughts, what thing do you
Hope to inherit in the grave below?

1820.

[blocks in formation]

As the wild air stirs and

sways
The tree-swung cradle of a child,
So the breath of these rude days

Rocks the year :- be calm and mild,

15

Trembling hours, --she will arise
With new love within her eyes.

IV.

20

January gray is here,

Like a sexton by her grave;
February bears the bier,

March with grief doth howl and rave,
And April weeps - but, O, ye hours,

Follow with May's fairest flowers.
January 1, 1821.

TIME.

5

UNFATHOMABLE Sea! whose waves are years,

Ocean of Time, whose waters of deep woe Are brackish with the salt of human tears !

Thou shoreless flood, which in thy ebb and flow Claspest the limits of mortality !

And sick of prey, yet howling on for more,
Vomitest thy wrecks on its inhospitable shore;
Treacherous in calm, and terrible in storm,

Who shall put forth on thee,
Unfathomable Sea ?

1821.

10

TO NIGHT.

I.

SWIFTLY walk o'er the western wave,

Spirit of Night!
Out of the misty eastern cave,
Where all the long and lone daylight,

5

Thou wovest dreams of joy and fear,
Which make thee terrible and dear,-

Swift be thy flight !

II.

10

Wrap thy form in a mantle gray,

Star in-wrought!
Blind with thine hair the eyes of Day;
Kiss her until she be wearied out,
Then wander o'er city, and sea, and land,
Touching all with thine opiate wand

Come, long sought!

III.

15

When I arose and saw the dawn,

I sighed for thee;
When light rode high, and the dew was gone,
And noon lay heavy on flower and tree,
And the weary Day turned to his rest,
Lingering like an unloved guest,

I sighed for thee.

20

[blocks in formation]
« AnteriorContinuar »