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I call the phantoms of a thousand hours
Each from his voiceless grave: they have in visioned bowers 65

Of studious zeal or love's delight

Outwatched with me the envious night -
They know that never joy illumed my brow

Unlinked with hope that thou wouldst free
This world from its dark slavery,

That thou — O awful LOVELINESS,
Wouldst give whate'er these words cannot express.

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VII.

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The day becomes more solemn and serene

When noon is past — there is a harmony

In autumn, and a lustre in its sky,
Which through the summer is not heard or seen,
As if it could not be, as if it had not been !

Thus let thy power, which like the truth

Of nature on my passive youth
Descended, to my onward life supply

Its calm — to one who worships thee,
And every form containing thee,

Whom, SPIRIT fair, thy spells did bind
To fear himself, and love all human kind.

Summer, 1816.

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ON FANNY GODWIN.

Her voice did quiver as we parted,

Yet knew I not that heart was broken
From which it came, and I departed
Heeding not the words then spoken.

Misery --- O Misery,
This world is all too wide for thee.

5 LINES.

I.

That time is dead for ever, child,
Drowned, frozen, dead for ever!

We look on the past

And stare aghast
At the spectres wailing, pale and ghast,
Of hopes which thou and I beguiled

To death on life's dark river.

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II.

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The stream we gazed on then, rolled by;
Its waves are unreturning;

But we yet stand

In a lone land,
Like tombs to mark the memory
Of hopes and fears, which fade and flee

In the light of life's dim morning.
November 5, 1817.

SONNET.

OZYMANDIAS.

I MET a traveller from an antique land
Who said : Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, (stamped on these lifeless things)
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed :

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And on the pedestal these words appear :
“My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair !”
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.

1817

PASSAGE OF THE APENNINES.

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Listen, listen, Mary mine,
To the whisper of the Apennine;
It bursts on the roof like the thunder's roar,
Or like the sea on a northern shore,
Heard in its raging ebb and flow
By the captives pent in the cave below.
The Apennine in the light of day
Is a mighty mountain dim and gray,
Which between the earth and sky doth lay;
But when night comes, a chaos dread
On the dim starlight then is spread,
And the Apennine walks abroad with the storm.
May 4, 1818.

IO

THE PAST.

I.

Wilt thou forget the happy hours
Which we buried in Love's sweet bowers,
Heaping over their corpses cold
Blossoms and leaves instead of mould ?

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Blossoms which were the joys that fell,

And leaves, the hopes that yet remain.

II.

Forget the dead, the past? O yet
There are ghosts that may take revenge for it,
Memories that make the heart a tomb,
Regrets which glide through the spirit's gloom,
And with ghastly whispers tell
That joy, once lost, is pain.

1818.

IO

LINES WRITTEN AMONG THE EUGANEAN HILLS.

OCTOBER, 1818.

5

Many a green isle needs must be
In the deep wide sea of misery,
Or the mariner, worn and wan,
Never thus could voyage on
Day and night, and night and day,
Drifting on his dreary way,
With the solid darkness black
Closing round his vessel's track ;
Whilst above the sunless sky,
Big with clouds, hangs heavily,
And behind the tempest fleet
Hurries on with lightning feet,
Riving sail, and cord, and plank,
Till the ship has almost drank
Death from the o'er-brimming deep;
And sinks down, down, like that sleep
When the dreamer seems to be
Weltering through eternity;

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And the dim low line before
Of a dark and distant shore
Still recedes, as ever still
Longing with divided will,
But no power to seek or shun,
He is ever drifted on
O'er the unreposing wave
To the haven of the grave.
What if there no friends will greet ;
What if there no heart will meet
His with love's impatient beat ;
Wander wheresoe'er he may,
Can he dream before that day
To find refuge from distress
In friendship’s smile, in love's caress ?
Then 't will wreak him little woe
Whether such there be or no :
Senseless is the breast, and cold,
Which relenting love would fold ;
Bloodless are the veins and chill
Which the pulse of pain did fill ;
Every little living nerve
That from bitter words did swerve
Round the tortured lips and brow,
Are like sapless leaflets now
Frozen upon December's bough.
On the beach of a northern sea
Which tempests shake eternally,
As once the wretch there lay to sleep,
Lies a solitary heap,
One white skull and seven dry bones,
On the margin of the stones,
Where a few gray rushes stand,
Boundaries of the sea and land :

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