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THE WORKS

OF

JOHN EA DIE

D.D., LL.D.

ANALYTICAL CONCORDANCE TO THE HOLY SCRIPTURES; Or, THE BIBLE PRESENTED UNDER DISTINCT AND CLASSIFIED HEADS OR TOPICS.

Second Edition. Post 8vo, 8s. 6d., cloth.

A NEW AND COMPLETE

CONCORDANCE TO THE HOLY SCRIPTURES,

ON THE BASIS OF CRUDEN.
Seventeenth Edition. Post 8vo, 5s, cloth.

BIBLICAL CYCLOPÆDIA; Or, DICTIONARY OF EASTERN ANTIQUITIES, GEOGRAPHY, NATURAL History, SACRED ANNALS AND

BIOGRAPHY, THEOLOGY AND BIBLICAL LITERATURE.

With Maps and Pictorial Ilustrations.
Sixth Edition, revised. Post 8vo, 78. 6d., cloth.

A COMMENTARY ON
THE EPISTLE OF PAUL TO THE COLOSSIANS.

8vo, 10s. 6d., cloth.

A COMMENTARY ON
THE EPISTLE OF PAUL TO THE EPHESIANS.

Svo, 14s., cloth.

DICTIONARY OF THE BIBLE

FOR THE USE OF YOUNG PERSONS.

With 120 IUustrations.
Fourth Edition. Small 8vo, 2s. 6d., cloth.

ANALYTICAL CONCORDANCE

TO

THE HOLY SCRIPTURES;

OR,

THE BIBLE PRESENTED UNDER DISTINCT AND CLASSIFIED

HEADS OR TOPICS.

EDITED BY

JOHN EADIE, D.D., LL.D.,

PROFESSOR OF BIBLICAL LITERATURE TO THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCII.

COMPARING SPIRITUAL THINGS WITH SPIRITUAL."-1 Cor. ii. 13.

Second Gdition, Rebised.

LONDON AND GLASGOW:
RICHARD GRIFFIN AND COMPANY,

PUBLISHERS TO THE UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW.

1857.

BS
482
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This is the third of a Series of Biblical Works designed for popular study, specially for the use of Sabbath-School Teachers, and generally for domestic reading and instruction. Occupying, as I do, a double position in the Church, that of a Pastor, and that of a Teacher of Theology, I have humbly endeavoured to suit my literary labours to this two-fold function. As a Professor in a Theological Seminary, I have given to the World some treatises of an Academic character; but, as a Minister, I have greatly rejoiced in the opportunity of publishing other Works of less pretension--but of far wider circulation- adapted in some measure to our homes and schools."

This volume at once explains its own nature. It is an attempt so to classify Scripture ander separate heads as to exhaust its Contents. The reader will find under the respec. : tive Articles or Sections what the Bible says on the separate subjects in relation to Doctrine, Ethics, and Antiquities.

Now, the construction of such a Work is somewhat difficult. There are verses which possess no distinctive character, and it is hard to select a place for them, for one Compiler might pat them in one Section, and his successor might change them to another. Many verses contain two antagonistic statements, truth and error in contrast, or truth delivered in a negative and positive form; and therefore, no matter where such a verse is quoted, one half of it does not and cannot belong to the Chapter under which it is found. To divide such verses is often impossible, for there would be left an imperfect statement, the necessary verb or full syntax being in the other portion. Then interpretation is so far involved, that it depends upon the sense assigned to a verse whether it shall be ranged or not among the proofs of a doctrine or theological tenet, and there is often room for difference of opinion. Besides, in spite of every attention, one will find that some important verse may have been omitted or misplaced. Another difficulty is to determine how many Heads shall be employed, so as to classify and place under them the entire Scripture. Such works as those of Gaston, Warden, and Clarke, only take up special subjects, and therefore do not necessitate such a calculation. But if you mean to comprehend the Bible, you must contrive that under a definite number of Headings its various verses

shall be apportioned. If these be too few, then there must be straining and maneuvre; | if too many, the reader's attention is distracted, and one great purpose of the Book is

lost. Thus Talbot (and West after him,) has a Chapter called “METAPHYSIOS,' a name unbiblical both in spirit and form, and under it he classes subjects so different, as Angels and Devils, Heaven and Hell. Talbot has another Chapter named “Conflicts,' a very vague title, comprising some paragraphs for which an appropriate place could not

1 New and Complete Concordance to the Holy Scriptures. Seventeenth Edition. The Biblical CycloDedia. Exth Edition or Fifteenth Thousand.

elsewhere be very readily found, and West, of course, simply reprints it. Indeed, in all Works of this nature, there must be not a little that is matter of taste, rather than of precision in the arrangement.

Our Work is based on that of Talbot," and we honestly award him the credit of the original production. But it is not a New Edition of Talbot, such as that which West has recently given in his own name. What we mean is, that Talbot's Collection suggested the idea, and has guided us both in Sections and Verses; so that if he has selected the right verses in any place, we take them. Indeed, from the nature of the Work, this imitation or similarity cannot be avoided. If the original Compiler gives every verse on a subject, a subsequent Editor, if he do not take the same verses, will be either defective or erroneous in his citations. Still, in almost every Section, we have been obliged to add, or subtract, or change. Talbot has thirty general Headings, we have forty-two. Yet we do not claim the merit of a wholly new production ; for, certainly, had we not been preceded by Talbot, we should never have entered upon the Work at all. We say Talbot, and not West : for West is but a reprint of Talbot, with an imperfect Index, and a few slight variations, by no means so numerous as those found in many a Second Edition of a Book.

Dr. West says that his work is based on that of "the learned Talbot." The language is fitted to mislead, for his Octavo is simply Talbot's Quarto, with a somewhat different arrangement of “Books.” The epithet of "the learned Talbot," seems to suggest that Talbot belonged to one of the Professions, as they are called. Now, Matthew Talbot was a worthy layman of Leeds, a currier by trade, a good man, of high independence, and of patient and inamitable energy. His “ Analysis” was the result of the quiet and persistent study of many years, and certainly verifies one of his own quaint and common sayings, “ I can honour any Draft drawn on the Bank of Patience.” Mr. Talbot's daughter was married to Baines, the eminent printer. The old man's generosity and patriotismhis learning and talents—his hearty love of the truth, and adherence to it at all hazards yet survive among his grand-children, and one of them, the Right Honourable Matthew Talbot Baines, raised by personal merit to his high position, is, at this moment, a Member of her Majesty's Cabinet. It is, therefore, with regret, that we find his Book with but a very slight disguise published in America as West's, and it is with indignation that we see it openly plagiarized and reprinted without even his name at all, and that so recently as in London, 1848. This last and unblushing appropriator of Talbot has adopted the meaningless title of the "Analogy of the Old and New Testaments systematically Classified.”? What is worse, he is so audacious as to say in his Preface,-“This Work has been for many years a labour of love to the Author.” Surely if such a plagiarism of a common Author is usually branded as dishonesty, then coupled with such a statement, and in reference to the Word of Truth itself, one is apt to call it by the harder name of profanity.

The Work, then, is simply Scripture printed under classified Heads. Thus to take 1 An Analysis of the Holy Bible, containing the whole of the Old and New Testaments, collected and arranged systematically, in Thirty Books, by Matthew Talbot, 4to., Leeds, 1800. Printed by and for Edward Baines, (Son-in-law of the Author.)

? An Analogy of the Old and New Testaments, Systematically Classified. By T. Whowell, Two vols, 4ta. London. Printed for the Author by William Clowes and Son, 1818.

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