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guage, and first principles of Christian truth. He has, also, performed Divine Service in English, once every Sabbath-day at Canton.

The servants of our Lord, engaged in this mission, although from dif. ferent nations, and connected with different churches, have cherished recie procal affection, and united in the most cordial co-operation. By this brief exposition, they wish to call the attention of the Churches, throughout the whole of Christendom, to the evangelization of, at least, four hundred mil lions of their fellow-creatures, and fellow sinners, in Eastern Asia, compre. hending China and the surrounding nations. Ye Christian Churches, hear your Saviour's last command, —"Go into all the world, and preach the Gos pel to every creature.”

Should any of our readers be aroused by the above to come forward to the help of those devoted labourers, who are struggling against almost insurmountable difficulties, to promote the spread of Christianity among the teeming myriads of Eastern Asia, we need not say how happy we shall feel in becoming the medium for transmitting their contributions.

V.--Translation of the SIVA-DHYANA, or Popular Muntra of

the Hindoos. To the Editor of the Calcutta Christian Observer. DEAR SIR,

In a recent number of the Reformer, the Editor of that paper, commenting on the case of Brijonauth Ghose, took occasion to recommend to all persons engaged or interested in the education of native youth, to teach them first their own religion; then, when they were advanced in years and in knowledge, to let them consider the claims of other religions. Now for my part I should have no objection to this plan of proceeding, provided it were guaranteed that after a certain period devoted to one religion, an adequate portion of time be devoted to the study of other religions; but who is so little acquainted with the customs and habits of the Natives, as not to know, that if the native pupil be removed at 12 or 14 years

of age from school, he has no time to devote to the study of the different systems of religion that demand his attention ; for to suppose that young men after they have left school have time, or if time, the inclination, or if inclination, the proper means, of acquiring a knowledge of the Christian, or any other religion, would be to suppose what is totally inconsistent with experience. Admitting however, that it is proper that a Hindoo should be acquainted with his religion, I would ask the Reformer, where is he to learn it, in what books is it to be found, and who is it that will explain it to him ? Have the Natives any means of learning it for themselves ? have they access to books ? can they diligently examine it ? are they at liberty to ask whence its authority is derived, and to demand evidence for its truth, before they assent to its doc

trines or comply with its requisitions ? No, they must hear it from Gooroos, persons whom they are taught and commanded to honor ; and they are to take upon trust all that they hear, without daring to ask a question as to the truth of what they hear The Shastras, they assert, come from God, and on that account alone, whatever is written in those Shastras, that must ipso facto be true; there is no further appeal, no, not even to reason. But where is the Hindoo that knows any thing about his religion, except what he sees and hears at the Jatras and Poojahs? I never yet met with a person that could defend it or explain it. Hundreds I have heard acknowledge, that to them it is unintelligible, chaotic, and perfectly at variance with all their notions of what is pure, and holy. When asked, how they reconcile the conduct of Krishna, Bramha or Siva with their notions of morality and decency ? their only reply is, and that accompanied with a smile, not a blush, “ They cannot tell.”

The subjoined tract is a specimen of the daily prayer or Muntra, which every Soiva is required to utter when he bathes in the Ganges. The very sight of it in my hands (I am sure I don't know why) excited a sensation of apparent horror in every native who saw it. It is astonishing, however, how little real regard they had for its sanctity; for not one of them would have hesitated to hear me read it privately, though in each other's presence, they affected to be struck dumb. Any person may witness a follower of Siva at his morning devotions at the river, but he can only learn, by reading the following translation, what the penitent is actually thinking about.

Translation of the Muntra.

(Written by a Gooroo for the instruction of his Pupil.) (Say) Reverence to Horo, I take this lump of clay; again reverence Horo; then addressing the clay say, I make thy image-praise to Sulpani(the holder of the Trisula or trident). O God, enter into this image, take life within it. Constant reverence to Mohesa, whose form is radiant as a mountain of silver, lovely as the crescent of the moon, and resplendent with jewels, having four hands,two bearing weapons(the mace and Trisula), a third conferring blessings, and the fourth dispelling fear,-serene, lotus-seated, worshipped by surrounding deities, and seated on a tiger's skin. The first of all beings in the world, the seed of all worlds, dispeller of fears, five-faced, three-eyed. Reverence to the holder of the Pinaca (a part of the Lingam). Come, o come, vouchsafe thy presence, vouchsafe thy presence, approach, rest, tarry here, and receive my offering. Lave thy body in the Ganges, O Lord of animals. I offer thee water to wash thy feet. Praise to Siva, take water to wash thy hands, smell this sandal-wood, take these flowers and leaves (of the Bel tree), accept this incense and this flame, consume this offering of mine (consisting of plantains, cucumbers, oranges, plums, and other fruits, molasses, &c.;) take one more draught of this stream, raise thy mouth, and now take (Tamboolung) or betel-nut, elachi, lobongo, kopoor, joyphul, dalchinee, chuna, kudheera, jone dhunya, &c.

The pupil must now worship, commencing from the east; offer flowers all round the image, and say,.

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guage, and first principles of Christian truth. He has, also, performed Divine Service in English, once every Sabbath-day at Canton.

The servants of our Lord, engaged in this mission, although from dif. ferent nations, and connected with different churches, have cherished reci. procal affection, and united in the most cordial co-operation. By this brief exposition, they wish to call the attention of the Churches, throughout the whole of Christendom, to the evangelization of, at least, four hundred mil. lions of their fellow-creatures, and fellow sinners, in Eastern Asia, comprehending China and the surrounding nations. Ye Christian Churches, hear your Saviour's last command,—“Go into all the world, and preach the Gos. pel to every creature.”

Should any of our readers be aroused by the above to come forward to the help of those devoted labourers, who are struggling against almost insurmountable difficulties, to promote the spread of Christianity among the teeming myriads of Eastern Asia, we need not say how happy we shall feel in becoming the medium for transmitting their contributions.

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V.-Translation of the SIVA-DHYANA, or Popular Muntra of

the Hindoos. To the Editor of the Calcutta Christian Observer. DEAR SIR,

In a recent number of the Reformer, the Editor of that paper, commenting on the case of Brijonauth Ghose, took occasion to recommend to all persons engaged or interested in the education of native youth, to teach them first their own religion; then, when they were advanced in years and in knowledge, to let them consider the claims of other religions. Now for my part I should have no objection to this plan of proceeding, provided it were guaranteed that after a certain period devoted to one religion, an adequate portion of time be devoted to the study of other religions; but who is so little acquainted with the customs and habits of the Natives, as not to know, that if the native pupil be removed at 12 or 14 years of age from school, he has no time to devote to the study of the different systems of religion that demand his attention ; for to suppose that young men after they have left school have time, or if time, the inclination, or if inclination, the proper means, of acquiring a knowledge of the Christian, or any other religion, would be to suppose what is totally inconsistent with experience. Admitting however, that it is proper that a Hindoo should be acquainted with his religion, I would ask the Reformer, where is he to learn it, in what books is it to be found, and who is it that will explain it to him? Have the Natives any means of learning it for themselves ? have they access to books ? can they diligently examine it ? are they at liberty to ask whence its authority is derived, and to demand evidence for its truth, before they assent to its doc

trines or comply with its requisitions ? No, they must hear it from Gooroos, persons whom they are taught and commanded to honor ; and they are to take upon trust all that they hear, without daring to ask a question as to the truth of what they hear The Shastras, they assert, come from God, and on that account alone, whatever is written in those Shastras, that must ipso facto be true; there is no further appeal, no, not even to reason. But where is the Hindoo that knows any thing about his religion, except what he sees and hears at the Jatras and Poojahs? I never yet met with a person that could defend it or explain it. Hundreds I have heard acknowledge, that to them it is unintelligible, chaotic, and perfectly at variance with all their notions of what is pure, and holy. When asked, how they reconcile the conduct of Krishna, Bramha or Siva with their notions of morality and decency? their only reply is, and that accompanied with a smile, not a blush, “ They cannot tell.”

The subjoined tract is a specimen of the daily prayer or Muntra, which every Soiva is required to utter when he bathes in the Ganges. The very sight of it in my hands (I am sure I don't know why) excited a sensation of apparent horror in every native who saw it. It is astonishing, however, how little real regard they had for its sanctity; for not one of them would have hesitated to hear me read it privately, though in each other's presence, they affected to be struck dumb. Any person may witness a follower of Siva at his morning devotions at the river, but he can only learn, by reading the following translation, what the penitent is actually thinking about.

Translation of the Muntra.

(Written by a Gooroo for the instruction of his Pupil.) (Say) Reverence to Horo, I take this lump of clay; again reverence Horo; then addressing the clay say, I make thy image-praise to Sulpani (the holder of the Trisula or trident). O God, enter into this image, take life within it. Constant reverence to Mohesa, whose form is radiant as a mountain of silver, lovely as the crescent of the moon, and resplendent with jewels, having four hands, two bearing weapons(the mace and Trisula), a third conferring blessings, and the fourth dispelling fear,--serene, lotus-seated, worshipped by surrounding deities, and seated on a tiger's skin. The first of all beings in the world, the seed of all worlds, dispeller of fears, five-faced, three-eyed. Reverence to the holder of the Pinaca (a part of the Lingam). Come, o come, vouchsafe thy presence, vouchsafe thy presence, approach, rest, tarry here, and receive my offering. Lave thy body in the Ganges, O Lord of animals. I offer thee water to wash thy feet. Praise to Siva, take water to wash thy hands, smell this sandal-wood, take these flowers and leaves (of the Bel tree), accept this incense and this flame, consume this offering of mine (consisting of plantains, cucumbers, oranges, plums, and other fruits, molasses, &c.;) take one more draught of this stream, raise thy mouth, and now take (Tamboolung) or betel-nut, elachi, lobongo, kopoor, joyphul, dalchinee, chuna, kudheera, jone dhunya, &c.

The pupil must now worship, commencing from the east ; offer flowers all round the image, and say,

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Reverence to Sorba (the figure of the earth)..
Reverence to Bhoba (the figure of the water).
Reverence to the fierce Bayu (the figure of the air).
Reverence to Rudra (the figure of the fire).
Reverence to Bheema (the figure of the sky).
Reverence to Posoopotee (the figure of sacrifices).
Reverence to Mahadeva (the figure of the moon-plant).
Reverence to Iswana (the figure of the sun).

Then say, Receive these offerings of fowers. I present these fragrant flowers to Doorga, thus I worship thee; then repeat these names as often as you can, counting on the fingers, (called Jhop,) worship and bow, and beating the cheeks, utter the words bom bom. Say—Reverence to Chundeswara, then throwing the flowers into the water, pray to Mahadeva to forgive your sins, twine your fingers one into the other, place the image once more before you, and then fling it away.

The Muntra*. . নমাে হরায় নমঃ। ইতি মুত্তিকা হরণ। নমাে মহেশবায় নমঃ ইতি সগঠন। নমঃ শলপাণে ইহ প্রতিষ্ঠোভৰ। ইতি প্রাণ প্রতিষ্ঠা। নমাে খায়েন্নিত° মহেশ রজতগিরিনিভ° চারু চন্দ্রাবত স° রত্না কম্পােলাঙ্গ পরশু ভুগ বরাভীতি হ° প্রসন্ন পদ্মসীন সমন্তাৎ স্তুত মমরগণৈ বাক°ি বসান বিশ্বাছ বিশ্ববীজ নিখিল ভয়হর পঞ্চব তিনেত্ৰ। নমঃ পিণাধক ইহাগচ্ছ ইহ তিষ্ট ইহ তিঃ ইহসন্নিহিতােৰ ইহ সন্নিকম্বােভৰ অত্ৰাধিষ্ঠান কুরু মম জা গ্রহাণ। এতৎ স্থানীয় গঙ্গোদক নমঃ পশুপতয়ে নমঃ। এতত পাছ° নমঃ শিবায় নমঃ ।যােহঘোনমঃ শিবায় নমঃ। ইদমাচমনীয়। ইদ স্নানীয়। এষগন্ধ। এতই পুষ্প। এতানি বিল্লপত্রাণি। এষ ধপঃ। এষ দীপঃ। ইদ সােপকৰণ নৈবেদ্য। পানাৰ্থ গঙ্গোদক। পুনরাচমনীয়। এতত্ তাম্বুল। ততঃ পূদি ক্ৰমেণ জয়েৎ। নমঃ সায় ক্ষিতি ধুয়ে নমঃ। নমম ভয় জল মূৰ্তয়ে নমঃ। নমাে রুদ্রায় অগ্নি সুয়ে নমঃ। নম উগায় বায় মুত্তয়ে নমঃ। নমাে ভীমায় আকাশ মুৰ্তয়ে নমঃ নমঃ পশুপতরে যজমান মূৰ্তয়ে নমঃ। নমাে মহাদেবায় সােম মুৰ্তয়ে নমঃ। নম ঈশানায় সুৰ্য নুয়ে নমঃ। এষ পুস্পাঞ্জলি নমঃ শিবায় নমঃ। ইদ দা এতে গন্ধপুষ্পে নমাে দুর্গায়ৈ নম ইতি পূজা কৰা নমঃ শিবায় নম ইতি মন্ত্র যথাশক্তি জপু। স্থা প্রণষ্ঠ গালবাদ্য বা নমণ্ডেশ্বরায় নম ইনেন নিৰ্মা ক্ষিপ্ত নমাে মহাদেব ক্ষমস্ব ইতি সংহার মুদ্রয়া বিসর্জয়েত।

* We have inserted the Muntra in the Bengalee character, as sent to us; but should our up-country rea:lers request it, we will supply them with a version in the Deb Nayrue in a future No.-Ed.

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