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and those smooth cheeks sulfused with a to give him a chance of recovery went sted fast blush, and that lovely bosom speedily silent, and the Emperor looking swelled and glowing: and I hated Ru- round, and seeing all the thumbs turned bellia as I gazed, for I knew not before downwards (for that is, you know, the how utterly beauiy can be brutalized by signal of death), was constrained to give the throbbings of a cruel heart. But I the sign, and forthwith the young man looked round to escape from the sight of receiving again without a struggle the her-and then the hundreds of females sword of the Moor into his gashed bosom, that I saw with their eyes fixed, with breathed forth his life, and lay stretched equal earnestness, on the same spot of out in his blood upon the place of guilt. horrors, taught me, even at the moment, With that a joyous clamour was uplifted to think with more charity of that pitiless by many of those who looked upon

it, gaze of one.

and the victorious Moor being crowned “ At this instant all were silent, in the with an ivy garland, was carried in procontemplation uf the breathless strife; cession round the arena by certain young insomuch, that a groan, the first that had men, who leaped down for that purpose escaped from either of the combatants, from the midst of the assembly. In the although low and reluctant, and half meantime, those who had the care of such suppressed, sounded quite distinctly things dragged away with a filthy hook amidst the deep hush of the assembly, the corpse of him that had been slain; and being constrained thereby to turn and then, raking up the sand over the mine eyes once more downwards, I be- blood that had fallen from him, prepared held that, at length, one of the two had the place, with indifferent countenances, received the sword of his adversary quite for some other cruel tragedy of the same through his body, and had sunk before kind---while all around me, the spectahim upon the sand. A beautiful young tors were seen rising from their places man was he that had received this harm, and saluting each other; and there was with fair hair, clustered in glossy ringlets a buz of talking as universal as the silence upon his neck and brows; but the sick- had been during the combat; some speaness of his wound was already visible in king of it, and paying and receiving his drooping eye-lids, and his lips were money lost and won upon its issue ; some pale, as if the blood had rushed from already laughing merrily, and discoursing them to the untimely outlet. Neverthe on other matters, even as if nothing unless, the Moorish gladiator who had common had been witnessed; while fought with him, had drawn forth again others again appeared to be entirely oohis weapon, and stood there awaiting in cupied with the martial music which ever silence the decision of the multitude, struck up majestically at such pauses

in whether at once to slay the defenceless the course of the cruel exhibition; some youth, or to assist in removing him from beating time upon the benches before the arena, if perchance the blood might them, others lightly joining their voices be stopped from flowing, and some hope in unison with the proud notes of the of recovery even yet extended to him. trumpets and clarions." Hereupon there arose, on the instant, a loud voice of contention; and it seemed to me as if the wounded man regarded the multitude with a proud, and withal

Miscellanies. contemptuous glance, being aware, without question, that he had executed all things so as to deserve their compassion, but aware, moreover, that even had that REASON IN MADNESS.--It is reporbeen freely vouchsafed to him, it was too

ted that a man in Bedlam made these late for any hope of safety. But the cru

observations:---- We that are locked up elty of their faces, it may be, and the here, are only called mad, because our loudness of their cries, were a sorrow to

madness does not happen to agree

with him, and filled his dying breast with loath

that of the rest of the world. Every ing. Whether or not the haughtiness of body thinks his neighbour mad, if bi his countenance had been observed by pursuits happen to be opposite to bis them with displeasure, I cannot say; but own. His neighbour thinks the same of so it was, that those who had cried out him--but then these two kinds of mad.

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ress do not interfere with each other. ferent trades, and yet starved with them Now and then there comes an eccentric all; Tasso was often distressed for five man, who, taking a just view of things, shillings; Hentevoglio was refused adthinks them all mad—him they catch and mittance into an hospital he had himself !ock up here. That's my case.” . erected; Cervantes died of hunger;

Camöens, the celebrated writer of “ The SURGERY.--- When the surgeons of house; and Vaugelas left his body to the

Luciad,” ended his days in an alms Tripoli take off a limb, they dip the Surgeons to pay his debts as far as it stump into a bowl of hot pitch, which şettles the bleeding without the trouble lived a life of meanness and distress;

would go. In our own country, Bacon of tying up the arieries.

Sir Walter Raleigh died on the scaffold;

Spencer, the charming Spencer, died EARLY MARRIAGES.---Dr. Franklin,

forsaken and in want; the death of

Collins speaking in a letter to a friend respec- causing mental derangement; Milton

came through neglect, first ting early marriages, has given one reason for the rapid increase of popula. for fifteen pounds at three payments,

sold his copyright of « Paradise Lost” tion in America, which we do not think Mr. Godwin has noticed in his recent

and finished his life in obscurity; Dryden answer to Mr. Malthus. The following Otway died of hunger ; Lee died in the

lived in poverty, and died in distress ; is the passage :-" With us in America, marriages are generally in the morning warfare with bailiffs ; Goldsmith's "Vicar

streets; Steele lived a life of penury and of life : our children are therefore educa- of Wakefield,” sold for a trifle to save ted and settled in the world by noon: and thus, our business being done, we

him from the gripe of the law; Fielding have an afternoon of cheerful leisure to

lies in the burying ground of the English ourselves. By these early marriages, we

Factory at Lisbon, without a stone to are blessed with more children; and from

mark the spot ; Savage died in prison at the mode amoug us, founded by nature,

Bristol, where he was confined for a debt of every mother suckling and nursing her of eight pounds; Butler lived in penury, own child, more of them are raised and died poor; Chatterton, the child of Thence the swift progress of population genius and misfortune, destroyed himself; among us, unparalleled in Europe."--In and Dean Swift died in a lunátic hospital another letter the Philosopher says,

which he erected himself. “After all, wedlock is the natural state of

INCOGNITO. A bachelor is not a complete human being—he is like the odd half of a pair of scissars, which has not yet OMENS.---Prince Charles (afterwards found its fellow, and therefore is not even half so useful as they might be together." Charles II.), when he was young, awoke

one night in a very great disorder and

frightful passion out of his sleep. Dr. LONGEVITY OF BIRDS.---The lon- Duppo, who was his tutor, and lay in gevity of birds far exceeds that of quad- the chamber with him, got up to quiet rupeds, and even of man himself, -The him, asking what the matter was? 'He common cock has been known to live said, his grandfather had appeared to upwards of 20 years; linnet and bull- him. After a considerable time he was finch, 20; parrots are said to live 40 got to sleep again; but not long after, years; geese, fourscore ; of swans, eagles, he cried more fearfully than before, and and ravens, there are various reports: told the Doetor, and others that came some have asserted that they have been about him, “ My grandfather appeared known to live upwards of 100 years :

a second time to me, and told me he had but there are few well attested facts. left my father three kingdoms, but my fa

ther would leave me none;" which proved

true enough in twelve years, and might THE FATE OF GENIUS. ---Homer have been longer; but as a great prince was a beggar; Plautus turned a mill; said of the English, that he had hitherTerence was a slave; Boethius died in to been a great admirer of them and goal; Paul Borghese had eighty-four dif- their prudence; “ But," said he, “I

man.

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am of another mind now, since they Sheridan. To the full: I knew herver
Lave cut off their king's head, and then well, a woman ofspotless character, Miss
afterwards send for his son to revenge it Mac Faden; she was descended of a
on themselves."

Scottish family of respectability; she was
agreeable in conversation, pleasing in

her manner; in short, she was a good ONE of the earliest Coffee-houses in girl, and an affectionate wife. I

I cannot London (they were first known at Ox- say that she was handsome; she had ford) was kept in 1657 by a barber beauty sufficient, however, to captirate named James Farr, near the Inner Tem the Doctor; and the truth is, he reple Gate.

It was viewed with great joiced through life in his captivity, for it jealousy at that time, and was indeed

was a gentle one. I believe I was the presented as a nuisance by the Inquest first he consulted on the subject of his of St. Dunstan's in the West; but with marriage with that lady; for he was afraid little success, we suppose, as they ra to mention it to his father, who, no pidly increased from that period to the doubt, like all fathers, thought himself present:, and only eight years after this

a better judge of an affair of so important presentation, a poem, with the title of

a nature than his son hiinself. Be that ic The Character of a Coffee-house," was

as it may, it was not the business of a published, containing the following pas- day; many letters passed between the sage, which shews that they were much youth and the maid; they were written frequented:

in a strain of unaffected simplicity; many « Of all some and all conditions,

of them were shewn to me after their
“ Even vintners, surgeons, and physicians ; marriage, but I did not think it would
The blind, the deaf, and aged cripple,
" Do here resort, and coffee tippic.

have been delicate to have asked a copy
of any of them; I only recollect some

lines that Miss Mac Faden wrote, which TEA, though now taxed at the rate of I can repeat, for I was in those days as cent. per cent. is (perhaps unfortunately) fond of reading poetry as others were of cheap compared with the price in the writing it; particularly if it flowed from reign of William, when it cost three female pen. Stay, let me recollect; pounds in the pound weight. Waller

now I remember them: I forget the ocwas as fond of this seducing beverage casion on which they were written. as Dr. Johnson and most sedentary men ; In pity first to human kind, but the poet used to make it with the Lore taught the art of writing; whites of new-laid eggs (two in a pint);

But soon deceit stept in, we find, which, thus prepared, he declared, a pre

And taught man false inditing, sently discusseth and satistieth all rawness and indigestion of the stomach, fly

False vows, false words,nay e'en false tears,

Soon after were invented; eth suddenly over the whole body and And Love from each account appears into the veins, and strengtheneth exceed Almost to have repented. ingly, and preserves one a good while from the necessity of eating.' His lines That he disclos'd the magic art, apon Tea show how partial he was to

At first for gods intended,

By which he thought the virgin heart it:

'Would be so much befriended. « The Muse's friend, Tea does our fancy

What vows, what sighs on paper flow, « Repress those vapours which the head in

In words as sweet as honey! vade,

They melt away like new-fall’n snow, “ And keeps the palace of the soul serene.”

In sun-shine now of money.

fath

any

gid;

Scraps.

Then Love with indignation saw

His tender views defeated ;
Traitors unpunish'd broke his law,

And crime on crime repeated.

DR. SHERIDAN.. Author. I hope the Doctor was as happy as your brother in the choice of his wife?

Then, Love, resume thy wonted power,

And punishi ev'ry traitor;
From Jupiter in golden shower,

Down to the petit-maitre.

bark,

One thing brings another to my re

Sonnets. collection. The Doctor and I called one morning on Miss Mac Faden, in order to take his leave of her for a few days, ON SEEING HER MAJESTY, AFTER as he was to set out on a journey, I for, get where. The young lady asked in a

LIFE WAS EXTINCT. tone that well expressed more than the words that accompanied it, how long When mild forgiveness won thy parting

Fix'd on thy features by the seal of Death, he intended to stay away? to which he

breath, immediately answered:

Pale, placid piece of earth ! that tender look You ask how long I'll stay from thee;

Gives to this storm of grief a fond rebuke.

Malice has done its worst! the beauteous Suppress those rising sears; If you should reckon time like me, Perhaps ten thousand years.

Pursued by foamingwaves and tempests dark,

Has sunk at last in long desir'd repose, Author. Very happy indeed.

And o'er the wreck the raging billows closc. Sheridan. Love dictated the lines. Thy life has yielded to the fatal blow, Author. And the Muse.

That could not lay thy lofty Spirit low : Sheridan. The Doctor, with all his

But when inexorable Time shall bring learning, was not what we call a popular Well may thy bitter foes implore to live

Their final moments on his rushing wing, preacher. His sermons were always com Like thee to suffer-and, like thee, forgive. posed of good materials, and he could sometimes rise with his subject; you may judge of his character from the few fragments I have given you.

Tales.
Author. They are valuable in my sight;
I like to see the human mind in its un-
dress; I love the early effusions of ge-

THE THREE BLACK CROWS; nius; especially of those that “lisp in numbers," and I am very happy that I called on you.

“ Tale!” That will raise the question, I Sheridan. In a few days it would be suppose, too late; I shall soon be gathered to my " What can the meaning be of three black, fathers—but the passage is smooth.

crows?" Author. I sce it is and if there is

It is a London story, you must know,

And happen'd, as they say, some time ago. any thing in my power

The meaning of it custom would suppress
Till to the end we come: nevertheless,
Though it may vary from the usc of old

To tell the moral ere the tale be told,
Songs.

We'll give a hint for once, how to apply,
The meaning first; then hang the tale thereha.

People full oft are put into a pother,
TRANSIENT PASSION AND

For want of understanding one another;

And strange amusing stories creep about, TRUE LOVE,

That come to nothing if you trace them out; There is a Love that lasts awhile,

Lies of the day perhaps, or month, or year, A onc-day's flower,-no more! Which, having serv'd their purpose, disOpes in the sunshine of a smile,

appear ; And shuts when clouds come o'er.

From wbich, meanwhile, disputes of every

size, There is a Love that ever lasts,

That is to say, misunderstandings rise, A shrub that's always green;

The springs of ill, from bick'ring up to battle; It flowers amid the bitter blasts, Prom wars and tumults, down to tittle tattle. And decks a wintry scenc.

"To note howmeanings that were never meant,
A chcek,-an
an eye,-a well-turn'd foot,

By eager giving them to rash assent,
Mav give the first it's birth;

Will Hy about, just like so many crows
The Howeret has but little root,

Of the same breed of which the story goesAnd asks but little earth.

It may, at least it should, correct a zeal

That hurts the public or the private weal.
No scanty soil True Love must find, Two honest tradesmen meeting in the
It's vigour to controul;

Strand,
It plants itself upon the mind,

One took the other briskly by the hand;
And strikes into the soul.

Hark ye,' said he, 'tis an odd story this, HENRY. * About the crows! I don't know what it is,

A TALE.

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Replied his friend. "No! I'm surpris'd at ROSANNA VALENZA, the only daughthat,

ter of the Marquis Stephano Alvaroni, - Where I come from it is the common chat. * But you shall hear,--an odd affair indeed !

who was the sole mistress of the palace * And that it happen'd, they are all agreed.

of her father, during his absence at Rome, Not to detain you from a thing so strange, being weary of the bustle which the city

A gentleman that lives not far from Change, of Manfredonia constantly presented to * This week, in short, as all the alley knows, her sight, and anxious to visit the se• Taking a puke, has thrown up Three Black questered villa which had formerly been

Crows! Impossible." "Nay, but indeed 'tis true;

the favorite residence of her departed I have it from good hands, and so may you;'

mother, gave the necessary orders; and, * From whose, I pray ?-So, having nam'd on the day succeeding that on which the the man,

marquis had quitted the city, she reStraight to enquire his curious comrade ran.

paired to the retired villa of Seveta, siSir, did you tell P-relating the affair,Yes, Sir, I did ; and if 'tis worth your care,

tuated near the mountain Saint Angelo, • Ask Mr. Such-a-one, he told it me; commanding, in the fore ground, a dis* But, by the bye, 'twas Two Black Crows,

tant view of the Gulf of Venice; while, not Three.'

in the rear, the majestic beauties of naResolv'd to trace so wondrous an event,

ture presented themselves in the most Whip to the third the virtuoso went. • Sir and so forth—- Why, yes ; the thing ting at a distance, in the misty mountains

variegated forms and colours, terminais fact; Though in regard to number not exact: of the Appenines. • It was not Two Black Crows, 'twas only The mind of Rosanna Valenza being

One; "The truth of that you may rely upon.

awake to every thrilling sentiment that The gentleman himself told me the case."

warms the breast of sympathy, felt, in this Where may I find him? Why, in such a

tranquil seclusion, the most romantic bliss place.'

that a melancholy pleasure can commuAway goes ho, and having found him out, nicate to the heart. It soon became her Sir, be so good as to resolve a doubt,'

custom, early in the morning, deviously Then to his last informant he referr'd, And begg'd to know if true what he had

to stray through this sequestered scene, heard :

wholly captivated with the verdant beauDid you, Sir, throw up a zek Crow ?' ties that glittered in Aurora's golden says, Not I;'

bespangled with the transclucent dew. « Bless me! how people propogate a lie! It was then that her soul felt animated Black Crows have been thrown up, Three, with fervent adoration for that beneficent

Two, and One,
And here, I find, all comes at last to none.

and all-gracious Divinity, from whom "Did you say nothing of a Crow at all ?" alone these multifarious blessings spring, • Crow! Crow! Perhaps I might, now I recal which hourly arise to enliven the eye, · The matter over.' * And pray, Sir, what animate the heart, and elevate the huwas't?'

man soul to rapture. • Why, I was horrid sick, and at the last, "I did throw up, and told my neighbour so,

In the course of her morning walks it • Something that was as black, Sir, as a

was the custom of Rosanna to visit a
Crow.'

small chapel, dedicated to our Lady of
Grace, which had been directed by one
of the Ancestors of the Alvaroni family

, . LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT; and which reared its fret-worked spire An interesting Tale, from events sup in a remote and tufted wood of darkposed to have occurred in the twelfth green waving pines, whose aspiring heads Century.

were seen at some distance from the « Specchless the hero, and astonishid, stood,

villa Seveta. To Rosanna this ancient And found an unknown temper in his blood, chapel was peculiarly dear, it having A painful pleasure seiz'd his beating heart, been the spot

where her mother was wont And, in his breast, he felt and for'd the to offer up her fervent orisons, and the

smart ; The wand'ring. flame creeps through his

silent meditations of returning eve. wounded veins,

In the middle of the choir stood a And all the springs of life the soft contagion sculptured monument of veined marble, gains."

BLACKMORE. whereon rested the effigies of Huberto “ Reason and love rond my divided soul :- Alvaroni, the founder of that edifice. Love to his tune myjarring heartwould bring, The altar was of alabaster, most curiBut reason over-winds and cracks thestring." ously wrought, representing, in basso re

thou chee

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