Lectures on History: Second and Concluding Series, on the French Revolution, Volumen2

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W. Pickering, 1840

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Página 331 - Cover your heads, and mock not flesh and blood With solemn reverence : throw away respect, Tradition, form, and ceremonious duty, For you have but mistook me all this while: I live with bread like you, feel want, Taste grief, need friends: subjected thus, How can you say to me I am a king?
Página 81 - The spirit it is impossible not to admire; but the old Parisian ferocity has broken out in a shocking manner. It is true that this may be no more than a sudden explosion ; if so, no indication can be taken from it ; but if it should be character, rather than accident, then that people are not fit for liberty, and must have a strong hand, like that of their former masters, to coerce them.
Página 331 - To monarchize, be fear'd, and kill with looks; Infusing him with self and vain conceit, — As if this flesh, which walls about our life, Were brass impregnable; and...
Página 43 - Early reformations are amicable arrangements with a friend in power ; late reformations are terms imposed upon a conquered enemy : early reformations are made in cool blood ; late reformations are made under a state of inflammation. In that state of things the people behold in government nothing that is respectable. They see the abuse, and they will see nothing else. They fall into the temper of a furious populace provoked...
Página 81 - Ye horrid towers, the abode of broken hearts ; Ye dungeons, and ye cages of despair, That monarchs have supplied from age to age With music, such as suits their sovereign ears, The sighs and groans of miserable men ! There's not an English heart that would not leap To hear that ye were fallen at last; to know That e'en our enemies, so oft employ'd In forging chains for us, themselves were free.
Página 82 - ... even though against a predominant and fashionable opinion : — When I know all this of France, I shall be as well pleased as every one must be, who has not forgot the general communion of mankind, nor lost his natural sympathy, in local and accidental connexions.
Página 325 - Tuileries be forced or insulted, if the least violence be offered, the least outrage done to their majesties, the king, the queen, and the royal family, if they be not immediately placed in safety and set at liberty, they will inflict on those who shall deserve it the most exemplary and ever memorable avenging punishments, by giving up the city of Paris to military execution, and exposing it to total destruction ; and the rebels who shall be guilty of illegal resistance shall suffer the punishments...
Página 43 - ... imposed upon a conquered enemy : early reformations are made in cool blood ; late reformations are made under a state of inflammation. In that state of things the people behold in government nothing that is respectable. They see the abuse, and they will see nothing else : they fall into the temper of a furious populace provoked at the disorder of a house of ill fame ; they never attempt to correct or regulate ; they go to work by the shortest way : they abate the nuisance, they pull down the...
Página 444 - I know there are several persons, amongst those who are attached to me, who have not behaved towards me as they ought to have done, and who have even shown ingratitude ; but I forgive them (for in times of trouble and effervescence, men are not always masters of their conduct), and I beseech my son, should he find an opportunity of serving them, to reflect only upon their misfortunes. " I wish it were in my power...
Página 80 - Plowshares his swords and pruning hooks his spears ; Calls to the good and brave with voice that rolls Like Heaven's own thunder round the echoing poles ; Gives to the winds his banner broad unfurl'd, And gathers in its shade the living world...

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