Interesting Anecdotes, Memoirs, Allegories, Essays, and Poetical Fragments; Tending to Amuse the Fancy, and Inculcate Morality, Volumen7

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Página 195 - There are many more shining qualities in the mind of man, but there is none so useful as discretion ; it is this indeed which gives a value to all the rest, which sets them at work in their proper times and places, and turns them to the advantage of the person who is possessed of them.
Página 185 - ... them. As Greece and Rome are the fountains from whence have flowed all kinds of excellence, to that veneration which they have a right to claim for the...
Página 101 - Is it for thee the lark ascends and sings? Joy tunes his voice, joy elevates his wings. Is it for thee the linnet pours his throat? Loves of his own and raptures swell the note.
Página 90 - For no assumed behaviour can at all times hide the real character. In that unaffected civility, which springs from a gentle mind, there is a charm infinitely more powerful, than in all the studied manners of the most finished courtier. True gentleness is...
Página 69 - What a gloom hangs all around! The dying lamp feebly emits a yellow gleam; no sound is heard but of the chiming clock or the distant watchdog. All the bustle of human pride is forgotten; an hour like this may well display the emptiness of human vanity.
Página 92 - Attacked by great injuries, the man of mild and gentle spirit will feel what human nature feels ; and will defend and resent as his duty allows him.
Página 198 - He supersedes every little prospect of gain and advantage which offers itself here, if he does not find it consistent with his views of an hereafter. In a word, his hopes are full of immortality, his schemes...
Página 91 - Gentleness is, in truth, the great avenue to mutual enjoyment. Amidst the strife of interfering interests, it tempers the violence of contention, and keeps alive the seeds of harmony. It softens animosities; renews endearments ; and renders the countenance of man a refreshment to man. Banish gentleness from the earth ; suppose the world to be filled with none but harsh and contentious spirits ; and what sort of society would remain ? the solitude of the desert were preferable to it. The conflict...
Página 117 - ... time. If you have resolution enough to do this, you cannot but love learning ; for the mind always loves that to which it has been long, steadily and voluntarily attached.
Página 34 - Were they to give us in their catalogue of such worthies as are now living, how different would it be from that which any of our own species would draw up! We are dazzled with the splendour of titles, the ostentation of learning, the noise of victories...

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