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PORT OF PHILADELPHIA.

Flour.–From the opening of the navigation to the

30th September, inclusive, the amount of Flour receiv. During the present year, from January 1st to Septem.ed in this city, by way of the Schuylkill canal, has been ber 30th, the amount of Tonnage entered at the Custom

105,401 barrels. House, of vessels arriving from, and clearing to foreign

of this amount there was received from the Union ports, has been, 127,298 07 tons.

Canal,

64,674 ARRIVALS.

From Kernsville,

378 | 1st qr. | 2d qr. | 3d qr. I total.

Reading,

7,567 52,212 27 places below Reading,

32,782 American, 1 11,547 | 19,256 | 21,409 27 Foreign, 2,334 8,497 | 10,082 80 20,913 80

Total,

105,401 | 13,881 | 27,753 / 31,492 07 | 73,126 07 CLEARANCES,

Commercial Herald. 6,891 | 17,189 | 11,359 35,439 Foreign, 1,474 5,563 | 11,696 18,733

APPOINTMENTS BY THE GOVERNOR. | 8,365 | 22,752 | 23,055 1. 54,172 Ellis Lewis, President Juige of the Court of Com

mon Pleas, in the Ninth Judicial District, in the place From the reports made to the United States Treasury of the Hon. Seth Chapman, resigned. Department, we find that, during the year 1832, the GEORGE M. Dallas, attorney general of the common. Tonnage entered at the ports of Boston, New York, wealth, in the place of Ellis Lewis, Esq. appointed prePhiladelphia, Baltimore, and New Orleans, were'as fol- sident judge in the Ninth Judicial District.-American lows:

Sentinel ARRIVALS.

SOUTHWARK. | Boston | N. Y’rk | Phila. | Balt. | N. Orls.

Commissioners-Official. Amer'n. |136,369 | 298,127 | 64,245 | 50,936 | 68,637

Democrats. East, West. Foreign, | 21,442 | 102,908 | 17,971 | 20,857 | 56,942

Total. 690 508

1198 (157,811 | 401,035 81,916 171,593 |125,579 Thomas D. Grover,

D. Francis Condie, 680

518

1198 CLEARANCES.

John F. Stump,

672
512

1184 Amer'n. (125,751 218,490 46,724 | 48,933 | 88,236 William H. Yhost, 674

509

1183 Foreign, | 22,427 90,900 | 14,131 | 15,648 | 59,620 Richard Mackey, 669

505

1174 1148,178 309,390 60,855 | 64,581

|147,856 Independent Democrats.
Henry Flickwir, 516

430
UNITED STATES REVENUE.

John L. Ferguson,

514
430

944 Nathaniel C. Foster,

513
422

935 Pont of PHILADELPHIA.—The Collector of this port has enabled us to furnish the following account of the

William Hughes,

511
419

930 493

Dennis Sweeny, duties that have accrued to the government at the

419

912 port of Philadelphia, from January 1st, 1833, to Sept. 30th, inclusive.

The Commissioners of Southwark were organized

Oct. 15th, by electing Thomas D. Grover, President of 1st quarter up to March 31st inclusive, $797,316 23 the Board, and John Oakford, Clerk. Mr. John Curry 2d do. to June 30th inclusive, 594,638 10

was appointed Captain of the watch, James Green, 3d* do. to Sept. 30th inclusive, 1,003,120 00 Lieutenant, and Henry Manderfield, Police Officer. Total,

Joseph M. Doran was appointed Solicitor to the Board,

$2,395,074 33 in the place of Parsey Oakford, In 1832, for the corresponding period the receipts were, 1st quarter,

$1,332,479 93 CANAL Tolls.-From the Blairsville Record we learn 2d do.

977,698 56 that the tolls received at the Collector's office in that 3d do,

702,456 00 place, during the present season, have been, up to Oct

ist, $10,191 89. During the same period last year, Total,

$3,012,634 49 they were $3,677 97; making an increase this year of *Increase of 3d quarter in 1833 over 1832, $300,664 00. $6,503 92.—Com. Heruld, INSPECTION OF FLOUR,&c.-Inspection of Flour, Corn

CANAL TRANSPORTATION.—The Blairsyille Record Meal and Middlings, for the port of Philadelphia, for says: the six months ending Sept, 30th, 1833.

“A lot of goods was received at this place last week, 206,863 brls. Wheat Flour,

by the “Boatman's Line,” in eight days from Philadel10,183 hf. brls do do

phia. This is the quickest passage that has ever been 27,063 brls, Rye Flour.

made by Canal Boats. Formerly goods delivered here 24,546 bris. Corn Meal.

from the city, by wagons, would take 18 to 20 days6,178 hhds. do do

and at a price of from $2 50 to $3 25 per hundred; now 1,388 brls, Middlings.

by the Canal Boats, it is only $1 25 per hundred.” Commercial Herald.

Coal MINE.—Mr. Horn has recently opened a Coal We are indebted to Mr. Davis for the Inspections of Mine on Buck Mountain, a few rods south of the Turnflour and meal for the quarter ending 30th Sept. pike, and about four miles of this place. This is another 65,002 bbls. superfine Flour

proof of the great extent of the coal region, - Moun. 5,920 half do do

taineer, 4,617 bbls. scraped 197 half do do do

We were presented last week, with a small twig of 1,150 bbls. condemned do

the Indian cherry tree, bearing about thirty fine ripe 644 do middling do

cherries of the second growth, wbich are equal in fia9,284 do rye do

vor to those of the natural season. They grew upon 8,485 do Corn Meal

the premises of Mr. AURAHAM CULP, of this place. 2,333 hhds do do.

U, S. Gaz. Germantown Tel.

do

do

HAZARD'S REGISTER OF PENNSYLVANIA.

DEVOTED TO THE PRESRRVATION OF EVERY KIND OF USEFUL INFORMATION RESPECTING THE STATE.

EDITED BY SAMUEL HAZARD.

VOL. XI.-NO. 17.

PHILADELPHIA. OCTOBER 26, 1833. NO. 304

RECEPTION OF GEN. WASHINTON IN 1789. the assistance of my fellow citizens, it was my fortune (See last Register, page 252.)

to have been in any degree instrumental in vindicating An address to the President of the United States, from country, I now find a full compensation for my services

the liberty and confirming the independence of my the President and Supreme Executive Council of in a belief that those blessings will be permanently se. Pennsylvania.

cured by the establishment of a free and efficient go. SIR

vernment. And you will permit me to say, on this ocThe President and Supreme Executive Council of casion, that as nothing could add to the evidence I have Pennsylvania cheerfully embrace this interesting occa. formerly received of the invariable attachment of your sion to congratulate you upon the establishment of the commonwealth to the interests and honor of the union, Federal Constitution, and to felicitate ourselves and so nothing could have been more agreeable to me at our country upon your unanimous appointment to the this time than the assurances you have given me of the Presidency of the United States.

zealous co-operation of its executive authority in facilitaIn reflecting upon the vicissitudes of the late war, in ting the accomplishment of the great objects which are tracing its difficulties, and in contemplating its success, committed to my charge. we are uniformly impressed with the extent and magni.

While I feel my sensibility strongly excited by the tude of the services which you have rendered to your expressions of affection and promise of support, which country; and by that impressioni

, we are taught to ex. I every where meet with from my countrymen, I enpect that the exercise of the same virtues and abilities tertain a consolatory hope, that the purity of my intenwhich have been thus happily employed in obtaining tions, and the perseverance of my endeavours to promote the prize of liberty and independence, must be effecti. the happiness of my country, will atone for any of the ally instrumental in securing to your fellow citizens and slightest defects which may be discovered in my ad. their posterity, the permanent blessings of a free and ministration. For, whatever may be the issue of our efficient government. And although the history of the public measures, or lowever I may err in opinion, I revolution will furnish the best evidence of the invaria- I trust it will be believed, that I could not have been ac. ble attachment of this Commonwealth to the interests tuated by any interests separate from those of my coun. and honour of the Union, yet we canrot resist this fa- try, vourable opportunity of personally assuring you, that in Suffer me, gentlemen, to conclude by assuring you every measure which tends to advance the national that I am well pleased with the justice you have done character, you may rely on the zealous co-operation of to the motives from which I have acted, and by thank. the executive authority of Pennsylvania.

ing you for the tender concern you have been pleased to In discharging the duties of your present important manifest for my personal felicity, station, it must, sir, be a never failing source of conso

GEORGE WASHINGTON. lation and support, that the unbounded love and confi. The address of the Mayor, Recorder, Aldermen, and dence of the people, will produce a favorable construc. tion of all your actions, and will contribute to the har.

Common Council of the City of Philadelphia, in Com. mony and success of your administration. For we know,

mon Council assembled. that eventually your happiness must depend upon the To His Excellency GEORGE WASHington, President of happiness of your country, and we believe that in wish

the United States of America, ing an adequate execution of your intentions and de- Sir, signs, we comprehend all that is necessary to both. We, the Mayor, Recorder, Aldermen and Common

Uniting, with our sister states, in the admiration of Council of the city of Philadelphia, have assembled, to those motives, which at this interesting era of our present you our sincere congratulations on your ap; affairs, have ind iced you again to relinquish the enjoy- pointment to the station of President of the United ment of domestic peace, for a conspicuous and laborious States of America. participation in the cares and toils of public life, we We rejoice, sir, that the citizens of America, so long fervently pray for the preservation of your health, and accustomed to claim your services in every hour of pubwe confidently hope that the consummation of a patriot's lic difficulty, have again given the most affectionate and wishes-the glory and felicity of your country, will honorable testimony to your distinguished worth, by crown the period of a long and illustrious existence, and calling you, with iinited suffrage, to take the highest prepare you for the enjoyment of an everlasting reward. seat of power amongst freemen.

THOMAS MIFFLIN. When the gloom which overcast the cause of liberty Council Chamber.

at the opening of the late war, occasioned by the alarm To which the President of the United States was dom in this infant land, for a moment sunk the spirit of

a mighty nation, armed, to suppress the voice of free. pleased to return the following answer:

its sons- You, sir, arose! instantaneous confidence pos. To the President and Supreme Executive Council of sessed the minds of your fellow citizens;-—under your Pennsylvania.

auspices—they fought—they bled-and, through unpar. GENTLEMEN,

alelled distress of war-you led them to freedom, the I receive with great satisfaction, the affectionate con. choicest gift of Heaven. gratulations of the president and supreme executive Scarce had that solemn scene passed over. when a council of Pennsylvania on my appointment to the Pre. triumphant victor returned his sword to the bands of the sidency of the United States.

civil rulers of his country. If under favour of the Divine Providence, and with ) Scarce had you retired to the calm retreat of domcsVOL. XII.

33

think my.

tic peace, when the civil rule, which we had suddenly God, for the great deliverance he hath wrought for tis established amidst the busy tumult of war, proved un. by your Excellency, when General and Commander in equal to secure the Flessings to be derived from a well chief of the armies of our country, and fur baving indigested constitution, you, sir, were again called spired the people with the wisdom of appointing you, forth, and, presiding over our, wisest councils, have by an unanimous suffrage, to the chair of the First Mahanded to your country a system of civil policy, happily gistrate over them. uniting civil liberty with effective government.

The tender regard which heretofore you always paid What then remained undone-is now accomplished: to the laws and liberties of these states, when you pos-And you are called to preside-in dispensing the bles. sessed almost dictatorial power, gives us a certain pros. sings of that government, in the forming of which you pect of a mild, legal and upright government. We are took so distinguished a part.

duly impressed with the mercies of God in preserving May your administration derive blessings to your you hitherto, in so many public and private dangers to country, and honor and happiness to yourseif.

which your person hath been exposed; and we hope In the name of the citizens of Philadelphia, we bid and pray the same Providence will carry you through you welcome; and assure you, that we, and those we the great work (which seems reserved for you) of es represent, have the warmest personal attachment to tablishing justice, insuring tranquillity, promoting the you, and shall always rejoice to meet you singly, or general welfare, and securing the blessings of liberty connected with the august body over whom you are and independence to the good people of your native going to preside.

country and in the latest posterity. Signed by order of the Mayor, Recorder, Aldermen, We want words to express our sat sfaction on this

and Common Council of the city of Philadelphia, occasion, and beg leave to assure you of our affectionate in Common Council assembled, this twentith day of attachment to your person, and our best endeavours to April, Anno Domini, 1789.

render your admin stration happy and glorious. ALEX. WILCOCKS, Recorder.

THO. M'KEAN, C. J.

WILLIAN A. ATLEF, jlis EXCELLENCY'S ANSWER.

JACOB RUSH, To the Mayor, Recorder, Aldermen and Common Coun.

GEO. BRYAN. cil of the City of Phi'adelphia.

Philadelphia, April the 20th, 1789 I consider myself particularly obliged to you, gentle.

His ExceLLENCY'S ANSWER. men, for your congratulatory address on my appointment to the station of President of the United States. To the Judges of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania.

Accustomed as I have been to pay a respectful regard GENTLEMEN, to the opinion of my countrymen, I did

It affords me the most sensible pleasure to be informself at liberty to decline the acceptance of the high ed, that my accession to the Chief Magistracy of the office, to which I had been called by their united suf. United States has met the approbation of my fellow frage.

citizens in general, and particularly tbat of the judges When I contemplate the interposition of Providence, of the supreme court of Pennsylvania. as it was visibly manifested, in guiding us through the Your recapitulation of the deliverance, in wbich AlRevolution, in preparing us for the reception of a gene- mighty God hath been pleased, in some sort, to make al government, and in conciliating the good will of the use of me as his instrument, ought only to awaken my people of America towards one another after its adop. deepest gratitude for his niercies in the time past, and tion; I feel myself oppressed, and almost overwhelmed an hun ble reliance on them for the time to come. with a sense of the Divine munificence. I feel that no. Feeling how greatly I shall stand in need of the pa. thing is due to my personal agency in all these compli- triotic assistance of every good citizen of America, the cated and wonderful events, except what can simply be confidence they continue to express in the rectitude of attributed to the exertions of an honest zeal for the my dispositions will always be as it erer has been, an good of my country.

unfailing source of consolation to me, in every hour of If I have distressing apprehensions, that I shall not difficulty or distress. While the whole course of my be able to justify the too exalted expectations of my past conduct will be a better security for my future countrymen, I am supported under the pressure of such iran:actions, than any verbal assurances I can give, I uneasy reflections by a confidi nce, that the most gra- will only say, that I should find myself singularly hapcious Being, who hath hitherto watched over the inter. py in contributing to realize the glorious work, which ests and averted the perils of the United States, will your partiality for me has been indulgent enough to never suffer so fuir an inheritance to become a prey to anticipate, of establishing justice, insuring tranquillity, anarchy, despotism, or any other species of oppression. promoting the general welfare, and insuring the bles.

I thank you sincerely for your kind wishes, that my sings of liberty and independence to the good people of administration may be honorable and bappy to myself our native country, and their latest posterity. and country.

I entreat you to be persuaded, gentlemen, that, al. ! pray you, gentlemen, will accept, on your own though it was with the utmost difficulty I could prevail behalf, as well as on that of the citizens you represent, upon myself 10 enter again on the stage of public life, my heartfelt acknowledgments for the polite welcome yet, since I have done it, the unequivocal encourage. I have received upon my arrival in your city. In ten- ment of support, given by the most respectable citizens dering these acknowledgments, I must also desire it and magistrates, will tend very much to remove my emmay be fully understood, that I entertain the same re. barrassments, and, I hope, to open the way for a prosciprocal sensations of attachment for the good people perous administration. of Philadelphia, which they have on all occasions

G. WASHINGTON. evinced in my favor.

G. WASHINGTON. To His Excellency GEORGE WASHINGTON, Esq. L.L.D,

President of the United States of America, CommanTo His Escellency GEORGE WASHINGTON, Esq President der in Chief of the Army and Navy thereof, &c.

and Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States.

The Address of the Trustees and Faculty of the UniverSir,

sity of the State of Pennsylvania. We, the Judges of the Supreme Court of the State Permit, sir, the University of the State of Pennsylvania to of Pennsylvania, du most heartily congratulate your join in the general joy,occasioned by your accession to the accession to the high and important office of President first office in the Federal Empire. 'It is by this honor, of the United States of America.

(the highest that America can bestow) that a grateful We are deeply sensible of what we owe to Almighty people express the affection which your eminent ser1833.]

RECEPTION OF GENERAL WASHINGTON, 1789.

259

for my

vices have excited in their bosom. It is this that has Society of the Cincinnati embrace this opportunity of given them but one voice in their delegation of this im- waiting on your Excellency with their congratulations portant trust, and that unites the homage of the heart on your unanimous appointment, by the People, to the with the duty of the citizen. To be the first magistrate office of first magistrate of this great empire,it being the of a great empire, is a station that many have attained: strongest evidence of your unrivalled merit, and of their but to acquire it by the unanimous voice of a free peo- exalted wisdom. Permit us to express our peculiar joy ple, is an event in the history of the world, as rare as and pride upon the occasion, that our beloved General, those illustrious virtues, of which it is the just reward, and the President-General of our Society, has received We rejoice in an event so auspicious to our coun. the free suffrage of each of our fellow citizens of these try:-and we confidently hope, that your endeavors to States. We have now the most perfect assurance, that extend the blessings of good government will be crown. the inestimable rights and liberties of human nature, for ed with a success as brilliant as that which distinguished which we have toiled, fought and bled, under your your exertions in defence of our freedom.

command, will be preserved inviolate; and we felicitate As guardians of this University, (which boasts the our country, that their national safety and dignity are honor of enrolling the name of your Excellency among secure, and that they have the best grounded prospects those of her sons we anticipate the encouragement of all that happiness, which a good constitution, under which such institutions will receive under your adminis a wise and virtuous administration, can afford. As we tration. The influence of sound learning on religion have the fullest confidence that our Society, whose baand manners, on government, liberty and laws, will sis is friendship and charity, will, equally with others, make it a favorite object in every civilized society:--and enjoy these blessings, ane partake of your regard, so the sciences having experienced your protection amidst we beg leave to assure you, that we shall never be the convulsions of war, reasonably expect a distinguish. wanting in our endeavours to contribute all in our powed patronage in the calm of peace.

er to your personal comfort and honor, and the prosWe devoutly play the Almighty Ruler of the Uni- | perity and g'ory of your government. verse, that you may long enjoy the felicity of that coun.

Signed by order of the Committee. try wh ch you have rescued from tyranny,and establish

THOMAS M'KEAN, Vice President.' ed in the blessings of freedom and independence: and Philadelphia, April 20, 1789. that finally you may meet the reward which awaits his good and faithful servants.

His EXCELLENCY'S ANSWER.
THOMAS M'KEAN, President.
Philadelphia, April 20, 1789.

To the State Society of the Cincinnati in Pennsylvania.

GENTLEMEN, To wbich His Excellency was pleased to make the following answer:

The congratulations of my fellow soldiers and faith. To the Trustees and Faculty of the University of the ful followers in the military line of this state, on my State of Pennsylvania.

election to the ch ef magistracy of the Union, cannot but GENTLEMEN,

be exceedingly flattering and pleasing to me, I accept with peculiar pleasure the address of the mind has been so deeply affected with a grateful sense University of the State of Pennsylvania, upon my ap- of the attachment and aid I have experienced from pointment to the first office in the union.

them, during the course of our arduous struggle for Notwithstanding I had most seriously determined liberty, that the impression will never be effaced. never more to take any part in transactions of a public

Ileaven alone can foretell whether any, or what ad. nature, yet a conviction of duty would not suffer me, on vantages are to be derived by my countrymen from my the present occasion, to refuse a compliance with the holding the office, which they have done me the honor unanimous call of my country:

of conferring upon me, not only without my solicita. Nor could I remain insensible to the honor that was tions, but even contrary to my inclinations. conferred upon me by this fresh and distinguished proof

I promise nothing but an unremitted attention to the of its approbation. Probably my fellow citizens antici. duties of the office. If by that attention I may be so pate too many and too great advantages from the ap. fortunate as still to continue to possess the affectionate pointment. It will, however, be an object indeed near regard of my fellow citizens, and particularly of that to n.y heart, to verify, as far as may be in my power, body of which you are the representatives, it will be no those favorable presentiments, by endeavouring to se

small addition to my happiness. The support which cure the liberty, and promote the happiness, of the they and you have promised cannot tail,' under the American people.

smiles of Providence, to contribute largely to the ac. I am not a little Aattered by being considered by the complis! ment of my wishes, by promoting the prosperi. patrons of literature as one of their number. Fully ap. ty of our common country. In the mean time I thank prised of the influence which sound learning has on you, gentlemen, for the interest you so kindly take in religion and manners, on government, liberty and laws, my personal comfort and honor, as well as in the prosI shall only lament my want of ability to make it still perity and glory of the general government. more extensive. I conceive hopes, however, that we

G WASHINGTON. are at the eve of a very enlightened era. The same unremitting exertions, which, under all the blasting storms of war,caused the arts and sciences to flourish in Amer.

The Rail Roan - A few days ago, we visited secica, will doubtless bring them nearer to maturity, when tions Nos. three and four of the Railway between this they shall have been sufficiently invigorated by the and Lancaster. About a mile and a half out of the four milder rays of peace.

embraced in the two sections, are ready for the rails, I return you my hearty thanks for your devout inter- and the spirited contractors (Messrs. Flynn & McGincession at the Throrie of Grace, for my felicity both here ley), only await the arrival of the bolts and wedges, and here:fter. May you also, gentl men, after having (which are daily expected) to complete the distance been the happy instruments of diffusing the blessings | They are fast laying the blocks on the remainder. of literature, and the comforts of religion, receive the immediately west of Lancaster is finished.

We understand that a mile and a half of the section just compensation for your virtuous deeds.

G. WASHINGTON.

They have commenced digging trenches on section

2-and in front of our borough and on the inclined To His Excellency GEORGE Wasuington, Esq. Presi- plane, they are engaged in the same work. dent and Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy The Engineer confidently assuses us that we shall of the United States of America, &c. &c.

have an opportunity of visiting Lancaster this season, Sir: the standing Committee of the Pennsylvania State / by the rail-road. — Columbia Spy.

CANDIDATES.

N.Mulberry

S. Mulberry

U.Delaw're

L.Delaware

North.

High Street

Chestnut.

Middle.

South.

Walnut.

Dock.

Locust.

New Mar't.

Cedar.

Pine.

Total.

ASSEMBLY. Samuel B. Davis, 476 318 392 304 294 182 180 315 178 104 179 433 373 363 181 4272 Henry Simpson, 472 309 391 301 287 178 174 317 174 98 177 430 368 361 176 4213 Wm. J. Leiper,

469 314 385 301 297 186 182 317 176 97 186 430 371 360 181 4252 Charles J.Ingersoll, 466 314 384 310 296 185 182 316 171 104 192 431 371 362 179 4263 Thomas S. Smith, 477 318 393 306 294 183 185 315 182 106 181 428 369 361 180 4278 William Stewart, 471 310 389 303 292 181 182 314 174 100 182 438 372 362 179 4249 Joseph H. Newbold, 482 319 396 318 298 187 186 916 183 106 186 438 373. 361 184 4333 Abraham Miller, 280 314 296 388 439 331 256 207 322 243 359 348 272 213 334 4602 Wm. H. Keating,

274 310 290 377 434 327 256 205 313 234 359 342 272 215 331 4539 Wm. White, Jr. 267 306 286 375 426 323 255 197 309 231 344 345 269 211 326 4463 John Wiegand, 278 309 289 378 426 323 256 205 302 233 344 344 271 216 327 4508 Davis B. Stacey,

269 310 285 377 434 326 255 204 307 237 351 337 273 212 328 4505 Joseph T. Matber, 274 311 293 389 435 332 256 206 311 236 357 344 271 212 328 4555 Chau'y P. Holcomb, 269 312 285 383 427 319 254 202 302 234 347 337 268 212 331 4482

SELECT COUNCIL. Joshua Lippincott, 775 617 681 674 714 492 427 514 482 333 531 774 638 572 505 8699 Wm. E. Lehman,

479 329 398 315 300 188 181 324 186 104 182 437 373 359 188 4345 John Moss,

478 319 397 312 303 188 176 322 185 105 189 433 371 358 188 4324 Henry G. Freeman, 472 324 392 303 296 185 174 320 173 100 174 430 371 358 186 4258 Richard Price, 272 313 291 378 425 322 255 203 316 247 359 351 269 218 319 4538 Wm. M. Meredith, 271 312 281 371 423 322 255 198 311 238 352 347 269 217 324 4501 WashingtonJackson, 271 311 286 377 426 321 257 200 303 237 350 340 268 216 320 4483

COMMON COUNCIL. Isaac Wainwright, 478 332 401 308 301 190 181 315 188 102 189 447 378 369 190 4369 John M. Hood, 473 328 389 304 303 183 180 312 181 98 182 437 375 367 188 4300 Lewis Ryan,

475 330 398 307 303 187 183 314 191 103 189 443 376 370 193 4359 George W. Tryon, 475 330 402 307 299 188 180 315 186 99 186 446 379 370 193 4359 John Troubat, 470 330 398 305 298 186 180 314 182 100 183 437 377 365 187 4312 Michael Baker, 476 322 389 303 300 181 184 307 178 102 181 438 373 365 191 4290 Silas W. Sexton,

476 329 391 303 301 182 182 313 182 99 181 440 376 370 180 4315 Evans Rogers,

475 332 403 308 300 189 183 314 189 102 186 448 378 369 191 4367 James Fearon,

473 328 398 304 297 188 180 314 186 99 185 445 378 366 190 4301 William Geisse, 472 330 399 306 298 186 180 313 184 101 183 442 376 364 183 4322 John T. Sullivan, 468 322 392 300 296 180 173 311 176 96 170 432 372 362 184 4234 John Horn,

473 328 396 302 296 184 177 313 184 99 181 447 377 365 188 4310 John Crean, Jr. 473 327 390 302 299 182 177 312 179 98 179 440 375 366 186 4285 S. J. Henderson, 475 326 389 300 297 181 180 312 183 99 182 436 374 364 189 4275) John Bell,

473 330 395 302 297 185 180 314 184 99 184 444 377 367 187 4318 Lewis Taylor, 471 330 398 306 298 184 179 313 185 99 183 443 377 367 187 4320 Peter Fritz, 476 323 390 283 302 180 178 313 175 98 176 433 372 359 187 4250 Joseph Winters, 475 327 389 299 297 181 179 312 178 97 178 455 373 363 186 4269 William Camm, 478 327 390 305 304 180 180 313 180 98 179 438 374 366 189 4301 James Andrews, 473 331 399 306 298 192 181 315 184 99 182 437 377 369 189 4322 Henry Troth, 275 309 290 382 431 327 253 209 312 238 363 344 261 211 323 4528 Joseph B. Smith, 268 307 294 378 419 321 255 197 302 236 353 338 255 209 320 4452 Peter Wright, 270 310 291 387 420 327 251 199 307 240 362 347 261 210 314 4496 Robert M'Bullin, 270 308 237 378 416 326 253 199 303 237 354 340 258 212 322 4463 John Gilder, 268 314 290 383 422 324 256 198 311 238 356 339 261 210 320 4490 Benjamin H.Yarnall, 268 308 284 380 425 321 249 197 309 233 356 339 257 208 320 4454 John Byerly,

270 308 287 375 421 322 255 200 302 257 353 338 254 207 322 4450 John S. Warner,

269 309 294 382 430 327 254 201 310 239 359 345 261 209 220 4509 Thomas Firth,

271 307 289 376 425 326 253 200 307 238 357 341 259 210 321 4481 Dr. George S. Schott, 270 308 285 376 430 323 255 198 307 237 355 339 259 206 322 4470 John Darragh,

270 307 286 392 423 323 254 199 301 235 356 337 257 205 320 4465 Robert Toland, 275 310 288 380 431 323 258 201 306 239 357 341 259 210 323 4500 Dr. R. M. Huston, 270 309 287 380 426 324 254 199 309 236 357 339 260 210 323 4479 Thomas Lancaster, 270 311 295 383 427 328 256 201 314 239 361 347 263 221 323 4530 William Montelius, 273 311 295 381 427 329 257 202 309 238 359 347 262 212 324 4526 Joseph R. Chandler, 267 307 282 372 423 322 256 198 300 234 350 338 257 211 321 4438 Enoch Robbins, 269 310 286 378 423 323 253 199 301 235 353 338 258 206 318 4450 James Hutchinson, 272 309 294 382 423 329 255 201 310 238 358 347 263 212 318 4511 Charles H. White, 269 310 294 381 426 327 255 200 310 239 356 346 262 211 321 4507 William Kirk, 270 307 287 376 422 321 254198 302 236 350 339 257 209 318 4446

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, William Ruff, 478 323 381 294 313 186 176 318 179 111 174 435 348 360 180 4256 Jacob Gardner, 257 304 297 385 411 317 255 202 304 227 351 344 276 212 329 4471

AUDITOR. Dr. Joseph Moore, 494 312 376 300 290 178 170 313 169 99 170 425 352 359 180 4187 Wm.J. Bedlock, 240 321 290 383 426 323 258 206 311 240 349 347 269 213 324 4500

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