The letters of Marcus Tullius Cicero to several of his friends, with remarks [and tr.] by W. Melmoth, Volumen1

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Página 150 - Cassius, now Leap in with me into this angry flood, And swim to yonder point ? ' Upon the word, Accoutred as I was, I plunged in And bade him follow : so indeed he did. The torrent...
Página 139 - Industry to Wealth; from Wealth to Luxury; from Luxury to an Impatience of Discipline and Corruption of Morals; till by a total Degeneracy and...
Página 29 - I am always at a loss what to write ; and, as there is nothing in the present dejection of my mind that I perform with greater reluctance in general, so I never attempt it with regard to you and my dearest daughter, that it does not cost me a flood of tears. For how can I think of you without being pierced...
Página 42 - I desire you would give me a full and faithful information how things go on : though indeed I have now more reason to expect the final result of this affair, than an account of its progress. " Take care of your health, I conjure you ; assuring yourself that you are, as you ever have been, the object of my fondest wishes. Farewell, my dear Terentia ! I see you so strongly before me whilst I am writing, that...
Página 82 - Tin; single treatise which Xenophon has written in praise of that renowned general, is more to his glory, than all the pictures and statues of all the artists in the universe. It would be a much higher satisfaction to me, therefore, as it would be a far greater honour, to be recorded by your hand than that of any other; not only because your...
Página 435 - The purpose of it was, to create a decemvirate, or ten commissioners, with absolute power for five years over all the revenues of the republic ; to distribute them at pleasure to the citizens ; to sell and buy what lands they thought fit ; to...
Página 245 - But surely you are become a most intolerable fine gentleman, that you could not bear the fatigue of writing to me, when you had the opportunity of doing so by a man, whom, you know, I look upon as one almost of my own family.
Página 30 - ... expect, that you act with great spirit and tenderness in all my concerns. But I lament it should be my cruel fate to expose you to so many calamities, whilst you are thus generously endeavouring to ease the weight of mine. Be assured it was with the utmost grief I read the account which Publius sent me, of the opprobrious manner in which you were dragged from the temple of Vesta, to the office of Valerius.1 Sad reverse indeed!
Página 35 - I am sensible, at the same time, of the many difficulties that must be conquered ere that point can be effected; and that it would have been much easier to have maintained my post than it is to recover it. Nevertheless, if all the tribunes are in my interest; if Lentulus is really as zealous in my cause as he appears; and if Pompey and Ccesar likewise concur with him in the same views, I ought not, most certainly, to despair.
Página 148 - PERCEIVE, by your letter, that my friend Caesar looks upon you as a most- wonderful lawyer: and are you not happy in being thus placed in a country where you make so considerable a figure upon so small a stock* ? But . with how much greater advantage would your noble talents have appeared, had you gone into Britain? Undoubtedly there would not have been so profound a sage in the law throughout all that extensive island. Since your epistle has provoked me to b...

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