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68 TLYSAU PENNILLION, or POETICAL BLOSSOMS, and PASTORALS. Gwna Havdy clymmedig,

Now the twining arbour rear, Ac adall o goedwig ;

Now the verdant seat prepare ; Athyn y glau ewig i glywed y Góg,

And woo thy fair and gentle love, A newid yn ffyddlon,

To hear the cuckoo in the grove : Gusanau'n gyfonion,

Through the smiling season range,
Tan dirion coed irion cadeiring.

And with faithful lips exchange
Mutual kisses with the maid,
Seated in the folding shade.

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A mi'n rhodio’monwent eglwys,

Along the church-yard as I stray'd, Lle 'r oedd amryw gyrph yn gorphwys ;

Where many a mould'ring corpse is laid ; Trawn vy nhroed wrth vedd vy 'nwylyd,

My conscious heart its pain confest, Clywyn vy nghalon yn dymchwelyd !

As on my love's green fod I prest. 0000000000000000000000000000000000

I. Dioval ydyw'r aderyn,

Blythe is the bird whồ the plain, Ni hau, ni ved, un gronyn;

Nor sows, nor reaps, a single grain; Heb ddim goval yn y byd, ond canu hyd y wlwyddyn! Whose only labour is to fing,

Through Summer, Autumn, Winter, Spring.

1.

2.

Ve vwytty ei fwpper heno,
Nis gwyr ym mh'le mae 'i ginio ;
Dyna'r môdd y mae'e'n byw, a gadaw i Dduw arlwyo!

3.
Ve eistedd ar y gangen,
Gan edrych ar ei aden ;
Heb un geiniog yn ei gód, yn llywio bod yn

yn llawen ;

At night his little meal he finds,

Nor heeds what fare may next betide,
The change of feasons nought he minds,
But for his wants, lets Heaven provide.

3.
Oft on the Branch he perches gay,

Oft on his painted wing looks he,
And, pennyless, renews his lay,

Rejoicing in unbounded glee.

Kan

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2.

Pa le erew why moaz móz vean whég,

Where are you going, my fair little maid, Gen alaz thég bagaz blèu melyn?

With your rosy cheeks and your golden hair? Mi a moaz a ha leath ha sirr a whég,

I am going a milking, Sir, she said : A delkiow sevi gura muzi tég!

The strawberry-leaves make maidens fair ". ź. Ka ve moaz gan a why, móz vean whég,

Shall I go with you, my fair little maid, Gen alaz thég bagaz blèu melyn?

With your rosy cheeks and your golden hair ? Gen oll an collan sirr a whég,

With all my heart, kind Sir, she said, A delkiow sevi gura muzi tég?

The strawberry-leaves make maidens fair. 3.

3. Pa le 'r ew an Bew, mộz vean wheg,

Where is the cow, my pretty little maid, Gen alax thég hagaz blèu melyn?

With your rosy cheeks and your golden hair? En park an mow, ha firr a whég,

In Parken-pig, kind Sir, she said, A delkiow sevi gura muzi tég!

Where strawberry-leaves make maidens fair. THE inhabitants of Wales and Cornwal are the only Aborigines ? of this island now remaining ; both of which, as well as their fraternal tribe of Bretagne, in France, all speak the ancient British language ; allow ing their dialects to be pow greatly corrupted, owing to the length of time they have been separated. The Welsh language was common to all Britain, prior to the Saxon invasion. The natives of Cornwal, and part of Devonshire, began to lose their old Celtie dialect in the reign of Elizabeth, and it is now almost extina ; although the people of Cornwal still retain many of their ancient customs, and diversions ; such as hunting, hawking, archery, wrestling ‘, hurling', and singing three men's songs; also, they used to perform what they call Chware-mirkl, miracle-play, or Cornish Interludes . At Redruth, there were till very lately, the evident remains of an amphitheatre, and another, near the church of St. Juft, vulgarly denominated a round; and the uses of those rounds anciently were to act religious, and other interludes. There is a Cornish play, in MS. with an English translation, in the Harleian Library: and two other Cornish MSS. in the Bodleian Library,.NE. B. 5. 9. which contain several interludes, or Ordinales. See p. 97. of the ad vol.

TLYS AU PENNILLION. Cleddwch fi pan fyddwyf farw,

When death shall call, do thou In y Coed o dan y Derw;

Inter me in the oaken grove; Y no gwelir llangc-penfelyn,

A golden - headed (wain shall play, Uwch fy mhen yn canu 'r Delyn.

A dirge, to soothe my dormant clay! Weithiau 'n Llundain, weithiau Ynghaer, Sometimes in London, far I rove, Ac weithiau 'n daer am dani ;

Sometimes to Chester town repair ; Weithiau 'n gwasgu'r Fűn mewn cell,

Sometimes caress my dearest Love, Ac weithiau ymhell oddiwrthi;

Or fondly dally with the fair : Mi gusanwn flodeu Rhos,

Her lily-hand now I would kiss, Pe bawn yn agos atti.

And call her smile an earthly bliss * ! Yn y Môr y byddo'r Mynydd,

Low

ye

hills in Ocean lie, Sydd yn cuddio sír Feirionydd;

That hiding Meirion tower so high; Na chawn unwaith olwg arni,

One distant view, O let me take, Cyn im calon dirion dorri !

Ere yet my longing heart shall break

my Love,

2

' A fimilar custom still prevails in Wales : when women + See Sir Thomas Parkyn's Cornilb-hug Wrestler. 3d Edition. have freckled faces, they frequently wash themselves with s At a village called St. Cleere, in Cornwal, there are the Tansy and buttermilk to make them fair.

remains of an ancient monument distinguished by the name of Cæfar says, that the inland parts of Britain were inhabited the Hurlers. See Borlafe's Antiquities of Cornwal. by Aborigines of the soil. Bell. Gall. V. 10. and Diodorus * Curew's Survey of Cornwal, p. 71. &c. Lhwyd's Archana Siculus.

logia Britannica. And Pryce's Archæologia Cornu-Britannica, 3 See also the first page of this Book, and page 37.

• David Thomas.
T

Tra

70

TLYSAU PENNILLION; or, POETICAL BLOSSOMS, AND PASTORALS.

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Robin-góch ddaeth at y rhiniog

Ni bydd tân béb wrés lle byddo, A'i ddwy aden yn anwydog ;

Ni bydd dŵr heb wlybrwydd ynddo ; Ac ve ddweuda mo'r ysmala,

Ni bydd 'vallen dda heb 'valau ; Mae hi'n per, ve ddaw yn eira.

Na bywiol ffydd heb dduwiol frwythauts

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72

TLYSAU PENNILLION; or, POETICAL BLOSSOMS, AND PASTORALS.

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