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OF

MR. EDWARD JONES,

WRITTEN BY HIS CONTEMPORARY, MR. JOHN PARRY,

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Mr. Edward Jones was born at a farm in Merionethshire, called Henblas, or Old Mansion, on Easter Sunday, in the year 1752. His father was, what is generally termed, a musical genius : he could not only perform on various instruments, but he also made several. He taught two of his sons, Edward and Thomas, the Welsh harp, another son the spinnet, and another the violin, and he played himself on the organ; so that the “ Family Concert” was at least a tolerably strong one. Edward Jones came to London about fifty years ago, under the patronage of several persons of distinction, connected with the Principality. His performance on the harp was considered in those days, when taste, feeling, and expression, were the characteristic features of a Lyrist, to be very superior. He met with great encouragement, and had the honor of giving instructions to many ladies of rank. He was appointed Bard to the Prince of Wales in 1783, but it was merely an honorary situation.

In conjunction with Dr. Owen Pughe, Mr. Walters, and a few literary friends, he published a volume of Ancient Bardic Lore, and Welsh Airs, about thirty years ago, and in four years afterwards brought out a second volume. In 1820 he published the first part of a third volume, and had employed his days chiefly since in preparing the remainder, so as to complete the work; but he was not permitted to accomplish it. He had been severely afflicted with rheumatic pains for some time, and his memory became daily more defective; he was a very reserved man, and passed most of his time alone, with his chamber door locked.

He had been a collector of scarce books, and possessed many valuable ones; but his inability to follow his professional pursuits, and his high spirit preventing hin from making his situation known to his relatives, caused bim to dispose of a part of his library, on the produce of which he subsisted.

I and many others saw that he was daily becoming an object of our friendly attention, and we endeavoured to ascertain his circumstances ; but from him we could learn nothing, notwithstanding it was pretty certain that he passed many days without a dinner.

It became at length a duty incumbent on us to take him under our care; a recommendation to the Governors of the Royal Society of Musicians was promptly attended to, and an annuity of fifty pounds was granted him—unknown to him. This single act of benevolence speaks volumes in favor of that excellent Institution, which was founded in 1738, with a view of shielding the child of song" in the decline of life, from penury and want, also to provide for the widows and orphans of its indigent members, at their decease. Mr. Jones entered the Society in 1778.

I was deputed to give him the first monthly payment. It was in the evening when I called; I found him locked in his room, at his lodgings in Great Chesterfield-street, Marylebone; I was admitted, he did not recollect me immediately, although most intimately acquainted with him; he had his dressing-gown and night-cap on, his harp standing by the table, on which was a blotted sheet of music paper. I told him the purport of my visit, but he did not pay much attention to me, and only asked, with much fervency, whether I knew “ The Melody of Mona,” (See Relicks, vol. i. p. 168.) a most beautiful pathetic Welsh air, in the minor key, to which Mrs. Hemans has written an excellent song, called “ The Lament of the Last Druid.” He took his harp, and with a trembling hand,

“ Struck the deep sorrows of his Lyre.” It was impossible not to feel affected on such an occasion—the scene reminded me of the dying hour of a celebrated Bard, who called for his harp, and performed a most plaintive strain

" Sweet solace of my dying hour,

Ere yet my arm forget its power,
Give to my falt'ring band, my shell,

One strain to bid the world farewell." In a few days afterwards he fell in a fit; the landlady, who sat in the apartment below, heard a noise; she ran up, but could not gain admission; the door was burst open, when the poor Bard was found lying on his face, with a heavy chair on his back. He remained senseless for two days, and expired without a groan on Easter Sunday, April 18, 1824, aged 72. He was conveyed to his silent tomb, in St. Mary-le-bone burial-ground, on the following Sunday.

Mr. Jones left a number of scarce books, and much music, which were disposed of by public auction, in February, 1825, and produced nearly 5001. He had, at various times previous to his death, sold books and prints to the amount of about 3001., 80 that his whole collection may be stated at 8001. ; an extraordinary sum, considering the habits of the collector!

Of his professional abilities, his “ Relicks of the Welsh Bards” bear ample testimony; and will convey his name, with honor, to posterity. They are the result of forty years labour and research; and his countrymen of the Principality, may now boast, that, as well as the Irish and the Scotch, they also have their “MELODIES.

J. PARRY.

* Mr. Parry's publication consists of selections from the “ Relicks of the Welsh Bards," with English words adapted to them, after the manner of Moore's Irish Melodies.

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ANEURIN, the Bard

16--17 Eifeddvod, or Congress of the Bards; in the reign of

Of the Battle of Argoed Llwydain, by Taliesin,

18

Cadwalader, &c.

25-31

Avallenau Myrddin, or his Poem called the Orchard,

Bards, Musicians, and other Votaries of the Druidical

24-25
King Arthur's Tomb discovered from a Bard's Song,

Ceremonies, wore wreaths of Oak,

5-89
Grants of King Arthur to the University of Cambridge,

The Bardic Regalia, or the Silver Harp, &c.

37

33-49 25-89

The three chief Palaces of King Arthur,

The Character of a Druidic Bard,

3-28-84-122
The Knight-Counsellors of Arthur's Court,

Ź

Celestial Blue, or the colour of the Bardic Robe,

The golden-tongued Knights of King Arthur's Court, IO

Of the Bards, after lofing their facerdotal character,

9

The three undaunted Chiefs of King Arthur's Court,

The three Primitive Institutional Bards of Britain,

II

The three Free Guests of King Arthur's Court,

The three Principal Bards of Britain;

10

The three Compeers of King Arthur's Court,

12

The three bloody-spear'd Bards of Britain,

Of Arthur, and two of his Knights,

58

Of the three Enfign Bards,

82

Of the two British Conquerors of France,

117

Of the three privileged Persons who frequented Palaces,

80

* Abaris, the Hyperborian, described; who is said to have

The three Duties of a Bard,

81

taught Pythagoras the doctrine of transmigration,

The three Memorials of the Bards,

56-81

America first discovered by Madoc ab Owen Gwynedd,

37

The Etymology of Bardd,

2-122

The Acts of the British Princes,

26

The Massacre of the Bards,

38

Armorial Enfgns used by the ancient Britons from the

Musical and Poetical Contests of the Bards, 26-27-31 34
remotest period,

10-56

46-47-50-58-85
Emigration of the Britons to Armorica,
1–69 Missal, or the Service Book of Bangor,

87

Antiquity of the Harp,

90-91

Englyn, on the Great Bell at Christ Church, Oxford,

77

A Print of two Ariandlws, Badges, or Prizes of Honour, 89 Of the latter Meetings of the Bards, &c.

60

Æolus's Harp,

106 Beverages of the Ancient Britons,

21

Anlaf, King of the Isles, disguised as a Minstrel, procured

Coins of Boadicea, Bladud, &c.

8

admittance into King Athelftan's Camp,

94-95

Bangor is Coed University founded by King Lucius,

The Arcadians, and their delight in Music,

Beli Mawr, one of the oldest Historical Fragments

97

Anecdote of Sir Roger Williams, and Marshal Biron,

117

respecting him,

6.

A curious Anecdote of Arnaud Daniel, a Troubadour,

52
King Brian Boiromb's Harp,

97

The three Animals whose Foot is as valuable as their

The Bell Harp,

107

whole Body,

80 Bleddyn ab Cynwyn established a Code of Laws,

28

Ar y-mór ucha, or Armorica,

Bagpipes used by the Britons at a very early period, 116-117

Corn Buelin, or Bugle Horn,

27-117

B

The Bugle Horn anciently in equal estimation, both
Blegywryd, King of Britain, called the God of Music, 1-&c. to excite Heroism, and as a Mead Cup,

118 - 121

A List of the ancient Bards and Historians, their Works, and The Horn of the Bugle, tipt with silver, used for

when they flourished, 13-14-15-16-48 to 52-87-88 drinking among the Gauls,

121

The Court Bard or Laureat, the eighth Officer of the King, 27 Brazen-horns found in Ireland,

121

Of the Pencerdd Gwlad, or Chief Bard of a Province,

27
The Bentwo, a Coromantee Musical Instrument,

114
The Fine for an Injury done to a Bard, in the reigo of Howel, 27 Burlesque Ode on St. Cecilia's Day, which was admirably
Relics of Bardism,

9-10-81

adapted to the common old English instruments : viz.

Laws to reform Abases among

the Bards,

28-29-31

the Salt-box, Jaw's-harp, Marrow-bones and Cleavers,

The Bardic Profeflion divided into three Grand Orders, 29

the Hurdy-Gurdy, &c.

107-&c.

Heroic Adions celebrated by the Bards and accompa• Belin, first built the Tower of London, and Belin's gate,

nied on the Harp,

3-27 The Battle of Gwengfirad described by Talielin,

20

Privileges of the Ancient Bards,

27-28-86

The time of Clera of the Bards, or Musical Circuit, 33-57-86
After the Dissolution of the Princely Government of The various Degrees of Bards, and Musicians in the latter
Wales, the Bards were reduced to employ their facred

centuries,

83-84-85
Art in Obscurity and Sorrow,

39-59-108
Bedd Cilbart, or the Grave of Killhart,

75

The Bard, before and after Battle, performed on his

с

Harp the Monarchal Song of Britain,

3-27
A Bard obtained his pre-eminence by Musical and Poeti-

The Cymry, or Welsh, descendants of Gomer,
cal Contests,

27--58

Coats of Arms in use among the Britons from the
remoteft period,

10-56

Requisites to become a graduated Bard, or Chair Bard, 30-31

6

Various Orders of Bards in the time of Gruffydd ab Conan, 29–30 Julius Cefar twice repulsed from Britain,

Revenues, and Donations of the Bards,

King Calfwallon's Banquet,

6

of Caradacus, Cynvelyn, Carawn, Bladud, &c.

8

A Bard received a treble Reward,

56

The Institutes of the Bards,

28, &c.

King Cadwalader presided in the Congress of the Bards,

Anecdote of Hugh Llwyd Cynvad,

Of eminent Bards, and Musicians,

37-38

The Constitutional System of the Bards became almost

Congress of Berds held at Caerwys in the reign of Elizabeth, 46

extinct in the reign of Elizabeth,

6

Carados of Llancarvan collected the Acts of the British Princes, 26

Colgrill

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i · CONTENTS OF THE FIRST VÔLUME OF RELICKS OF THE WELSH BARDS.

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60-74

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Colgrin besieged in the city of York by King Arthur, 94 Eisteddvod, or Congress of the Bards held triennial in the

The Crwth,

114-115 reign of Cadwalader,

26

Of the three stringed Crowth, or Rebeck,

116
Eisteddvodau, and where held, &c.

31–45–76
The Cornicyll, a kind of Pastoral Pipe,

116 Eisteddvodau beld at Caerwys, under the auspices of Queen

Cyhelyn, and Cadwgan, celebrated Harpers, and Composers

Elizabeth,

46–76

of Welth Music,

55-48 A Summons for an Eisteddvod, to all Professors of Poetry

Counterpoint, or Harmony known to the Ancient Britons · and Music, by the authority of King Henry the VIIIth, 46

prior to Guido,

29–34-35–36-105 Exglynion i'r Eos, or extempore Stanzas on the Nightingale,

The term Canon (or Song in parts,) appears in the Sixth

which were the fruit of a Poetical Contest,

47

Century,

105 The three Enchanters of Britain,

80

Thu three perpetual Choirs of Britain,

I!

82

Of the three Ensign Bards,
Clerwr, or Circuit Songster, and his occupation,

33-83

An Elcgy in commemoration of One and Twenty Musicians

Clera of the Bards, or Musical Circuit,

26-33-86 and Poets, and foretelling the decline of Music and

Cyff Cler, or the Butt of the Cler,

34 Poetry in Wales,

50-51-52

The Extent Book of North Wales,
A Cornish Song; Plays, &c ; the Cornish began to lose

87
their Celtic dialect in the reign of Elizabeth,

69 Elifba the Prophet, thought Mufic necessary to excite him
Corn Buelin,

27-117

to a fit disposition for receiving the impression of the

The Cuckoo's Song to Meirionydd,

67 Spirit of God,

91

Craig y Deryn, in Merionethshire, described,

78 Englynion, or Poetical Blossoms, and Stanzas, 74 75 76 77 78

Claudius Philips, the Harper ; his Epitaph by Dr. Johnson, 50 Epigram on the Ten Commandments,

68

A Charter granted to the King of the Minstrels,

II2 A beautiful Englyn upon a Woman's Kiss,

74

The Charge to the Minrels, which was delivered in the A remarkable Englyn on the faithful Greyhound of Prince

Music Court of the Honour of Titbury, 109-110-111-112

Llewelyn,

75

The three Irresistible Chiefs of Britain,

IL

Eran Mailan, Harper to Queen Anne, and Performer

The three Undaunted Chiefs of King Arthur's Court, II

on the Harp, in the choir of Westminster Abbey,

49

Three things belonging to Composition,

82 The Seven Excellences which a man ought to possess,

British Coins, and Iron Rings of a certain weight, prior to Extempore Effufions, or Pennillion,

theirintercourse with the Romans. (And, see farther

38

King Edward's Harper faved his life from affaflination,

Edward the First said to have destroyed the Welsh Bards, 38

in Borlafe's ntiquities of Cornwall, Chap. XII. p. 258,

8

Of the Father of English Poetry,

&c. and plate XXIII second edition).

16-100

Chriitianity introduced very early among the Aboriginal The Errors of the Press at the bottom of page

123

Britons,

II-79-80 Extempore compofitions of the Bards for the Chair,

76-47

British Clergy flain by Ethelvred,

F

Of the Horn given by King Canute to the Pufey family, 121 The three Honourable Feasts of Britain,

6-80

A Stratagem of Malgwn to tavour the Poets at a Contest, 26 n.5 The Fine for striking a Bard, or Harper,

D

Of Freckled Faces,

69

Tomb of the Bard Davydd Ddú of Hiraddug, facing page 16 The three Family Beauties,

80

G

The three Orders of the Druids,

2-3-4
Druidical Verses,

Gwallog ab Llëenawg, or Galgacus Rex,
Druidical Maxims ; Laws, Temples, &c. 5-6-7-8-9

Grëal, or St. Grëal, the holy collection of Legends,

87
Druids and Bards, the Fathers of Science,

3-7-8

Giraldus Cambrensis's account of Welsh Music, and

Druideffes,

6-8 Musicians,

34-35-95

Druidism originated in Britain,

7-93

Sir John Gower, of Glamorganshire, the Father of

Druids and Bards supposed to be the first Framers of Laws English Poetry,

16-100

in Britain.

The Golden age of Welsh Poetry,

13-37-38

The Etymology of Derwydd, or Druid, &c.

The three primary requisites of Genius,

81

Disciples of the Druids studied twenty years,

Gruffydd ab Conan, created Laws to reform Abuses among

4

Transmigration of the Soul, a Tenet of the Druids,

the Bards,

28-29-31

The Dress of the Druids,

8-9

Donations, and Privileges appointed by the statute of

Druids and Bards resume their Functions,

7

Prince Gruffydd ab Conan to be given to all the Bards

and Musicians,

86

The Druids took refuge in Ireland, Bardsey, the Ille

The Four and Twenty ancient Games of the Welsh,

of Man, &c.

9

The Horn of Sir Piers Gruffydd, of Penrhyn,

The Bards and Druids had an extraordinary veneration

89-120
for the number Three,

The Gododin, an heroic Poem, by Aneurin

105

17

Dyunwal Moelmud, the first Monarch who constituted Laws

H

in Britain,

56-79 Historical, or Antiquarian Bards,

10-29-83-&c.

The different degrees of Persons among the Ancient Britons, 57 Howel Dda's Laws,

27

St. Dunstan, accomplished in Music: His Harp would An Ancient Heroic Poem,

17-&c.

without the interposition of any visible hand, pour out ·

The Harp, the most Ancient of all Musical Instruments, 90, 94

the most harmonious Sounds,

106 The Harp totally different from the Grecian Lyra,

The Drum,

117 The ten stringed Harp of David was made of Cedar,

92

Of Davydd ah Gwilym, the Bard,

42-43-&c. Anciently among the Welsh, the Harp was one of the

A Tranflation of Davydd ab Gwilym's Cowydd y Delyn Ledr, 102 indispensable accomplishments for a Gentleman,

94

Of the Ducking Chair, at Dolgelleu,

75

Lord Herbert of Cherbury's Epitaph

78

The

-

89-90

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The three Lawful Harps of the Welsh,

94

A Print, or Trophy, of fome of the Welsh Musical Instru-

The Privileges of a Bard, or Harper,

27-28-94 ments ; viz. the Triple Harp, the Crwib, the Crwth Tri-

Female Performers on the Harp among the Antient Wellh, 95 thant, the Pibgorn, the Bugle Horn, and the Tabret, or
The Harp of Holy Kejeinus,

95

Drum į with some Specimens of the Ancient Mufical

Panegyrics on the Harp by Sacred Writers, Bards,

Notation of the Welsh, at the bottom of page

89

and Poets,

99-100-101 The Welsh formerly had Six kinds of Music | Instruments, 122

A list of Poems written to folicit a Harp,

Musical Instruments of Ireland in the

year TI88

95-97

of the hair-strung Harp, and Poem on the Leathern

The Irish formerly used the Bagpipes as an incentive to War, 98

Harp,

28-32-102 Of the Musical Instruments of the Ancient Britons, ex-

Progreffive improvements, and compass of the Welsh

tracted from the Welsh Laws,

114

Harps, viz. the Harp with a fingle row, a double

The three Indifpenfibles for an Instrumental Musician, 82

row, and a tripple row, of strings

103104

к
Harmony in all probability was first played on the Harp, 35-105 The three Golden-tongued Knights of King Arthur's Court, 10
The Harpsichord first originated from the Harp, 97-104 The three Knight-Counsellors of King Arthur's Court, – 12
The Harp the Armorial Ensign of Ireland,
98 The Insatiable Kisser,

74-75

Anciently the Italians had not the Harp,

97 An admirable Poem on a Kiss

76

When the Harp was first introduced into Italy, it

L

contained three O&aves, and afterwards acquired

Lucius, the first Christian King of Britain,

8-IT

two rows of strings,

95–96 The three Holy Lineages of Britain,

80

The Harp formerly in use among the Scots, where

Llywarch Hên, the Cunubrian Prince, and a noted Bard, 21-22

there is a Bardic Veftige still remaining,

99 The Lamentations of Leyarch Hến,

Thom de l'indo's account of the Harp,

99 Llyvr o Gaer Vyrddin ;'a Manufcript,

15

Le dia de la Harp,

105-106 Llyvr-Côch ö Hergest ; a Manuscript,

The etymology of Telyn, or Harp,

113 Of the Lyra, Testudo, Barbiton, Kithara, Phorminx, or Chelys,

The Pedal Harp,

103 see Note 12, in pages

90-91

Th Ealian Huy,

106 Of Ancient British Letters,

7-8-56-79

Of the 1 heban Harp,

114 The three Exciters of Love,

The Bell Harpa

107 M.S. Records of Llandaft; and of Bangor, ftill extant, 16 -87

The Jaw's Harp, erroneously termed Jew's-Harp, 107

M.

Hurdy Gourdy,

91107
The three Memorials of Britain,

-56-57-58–59

Henry the Fifth's Grand Coronation,

106

The Mead Song, by Taliesin,

The Saxon's, probably, had not the Harp, nor letters,

Mead, Bragget, Ale, Clary-wine, &c.

21-118

prior to their arrival in Britain,

9-8-106

Myrddin ab Morurya, the Bard,

23-71-25

Hirlas, the Drinking Horn of Owen Cyveiliog, 118&c.

Myrddin Emrys, the Magician,

23

Three Social Horós allotted for the use of the King,
117 Of the Monarchal Song of Britain,

27-94

The Horn of St. Patrick,

121

Mwynen Gwynedd,

26

The Bugle Horn,

120

Morvydd's Pipes,

26

A new Era of British Harmony,

55

Music and Poetry were inseparably united in the fame

A remarkable Account of Hugh Llwyd Cynvael, the Poet

perfon in the reign of Howel,

28

and Warrior,

78

The names of the four-and-twenty Metres of Welsh Poetry, 30--53

A Hunter's Horn fuppoted to have been given by John

The names of the four-and-i wenty Measures of Welsh Music, 29

of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, to the Efcheator and

An Ancient Welsh Musical Manuscript written in an un-

Coroner of the Honour of Titbury,

common Notation

28

According to the old Welin Hunting Laws, every person

A series of celebrated Musicians, and when they flou-

that carried a Horn was obliged to know the Nine Chases, 118

rished,

37-38-48-49-50

Stanzas on a Pack of Hounds,

74-77

Of the National Melodies, or Bardic Tunes of the Ancient

Of the lager Horn,

Britons,

29-38-55-122

The three Golden-robed Heralds of Britain,

IO

Musical and Poetical Circuits of the Bards,

33-86

The three War-tombed Heroes of Britain,

12

Of Ancient Welle Manuscripts, 1-9-15-16-79-87-&c.

The privilege of founding the Trumpet among the

Musicians, and other Votaries of the Druidical Ceremo.

Hebrews was reserved to the Priests only,

1214&c.

nies, were wreathed with Oak,

5

The Harp totally different from the Grecian Lyra,

go Of the Mistletoe,

I

Of Madoc ah Owen Gwynedd, who first discovered America, 37

Ithel, Iorwerth, and Yr Athro Védd, supposed to have been Of Musical and Poetical Contests, 26-27-31-34-46-47-50-58-85

Druids,

The three chief Magicians of the Ifand of Britain,

79

The Holy Men of Ireland anciently amused themselves in

The three graduated Songiters, or Musicians,

playing on the Harp,

95 The three indispensables for an Instrumental Musician,

James Stuart, King of Scotland, (the first of that name;)

The three Honours of a Musician,

civilized the Scotch nation, and was an admirable

The three Excellences of a Minstrel,

Musician, and performer on the Harp,

99 The three principal kinds of Welsh Metres,

82

Stanza on the Igyzer Vách,

100 The various degrees of Musicians,

48-85-&c.

A Differtation on the Musical Instruments of the

Memorandums respecting some of the Bards and Historians,

Aboriginal Britons, or Welsh,

go, to 122

with an Account of their Works, 13-14-15-16--87-88

Immunities, and Donations of the Bards, 27-28-33--56--86 | The Minstrels of the Saxous,

108_&c.

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