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Rhoscolyn.-A rectory, in the bishop's gift.

Hath two chapels under it, viz. Llanvair yn Neu

bwll, and Llanvihangel y Traeth. Valued tempore Henry VIII.

10 6 8 Elizabeth,

10

5 0 Incumbent, 1785, Richard Owen; William

Griffith.
Llanrhuddlad.-A rectory, in the bishop's gift.

Hath two chapels under it, viz. Llanflewyn 3 and

Llanrhwydrus.
Valued tempore Henry VIII.

14 11 6 Elizabeth,

14 11 8 Incumbent, 1785, Richard Williams, B.A. Llansadwrn.—A rectory, in the bishop's gift. Valued tempore Henry VIII.

9 6 8 Elizabeth,

7 18 6 Incumbent, 1785, Hugh Humphreys. Trevdraeth.—A rectory, in the bishop's gift.

Hath under it one chapel, viz. Llangwyven.
Valued tempore Henry VIII.

14 8 10 Elizabeth,

14 9 93 Incumbent, 1785, Richard Griffith. Llantrisant.-A rectory, in the bishop's gift.

Hath four chapels under it, viz. Ceidio, Llechgyn

varwy, Gweredog, and Llanllibio. Valued tempore Henry VIII.

26 0 0 Elizabeth,

25 10 0 Incumbent, 1785, John Ellis, LL.B. Llanvachraith.—A rectory, in the bishop's gift.

Hath two chapels under it, viz. Llan ** and Llan

vugail.
Valued tempore Henry VIII.

16 0 0 Elizabeth,

14 11 0 Incumbent, 1785, Thomas Ellis. Llanvaethlu.24-A rectory, in the bishop's gift.

Hath one chapel under it, viz. Llanywrog.
Valued tempore Henry VIII.

0 0 Elizabeth,

17

7 6 Incumbent, 1785, Humphrey Jones, M.A. Llanvechell.25-A rectory, in the bishop's gift.

Hath one chapel under it, viz. Llanddygwal, fallen

to ruin many years since. Valued tempore Henry VIII.

11 11 3 Elizabeth,

11 11 6 Incumbent, 1785, Lewis Lewis, and vicar of

Llandan.

17

Llanvair Pwllgwyngyll.—A rectory, in the bishop's gift.

Hath one chapel under it, viz. Llandysilio, 2 6
Valued tempore Henry VIII.

7 6 8 Elizabeth,

6 15 0 Incumbent, 1785, Francis Wynne, obiit; Richard

Prichard, of Dynam, succeeded. Newborough.27_A rectory, in the lord chancellor's gift. Valued tempore Henry VIII.

10 13 7 Elizabeth,

8 10 0 Incumbent, Owen Jones, B.A.

ANNOTATIONS.

Aberfraw, or agitated river, is a place celebrated for being the residence of the Princes of Gwynedd, from the time of Roderic the Great, A.D. 843, to the last Llywelyn, in 1282. Some remains of the palace are still to be traced.

2 Beuno, the son of Huwgi ap Gwynlliw ap Glywis ap Tegyd, by Peren, daughter of Lleudyn Lluydawg, from Dinas Edwin, in the north. “There are several churches dedicated to this saint, to whom all calves and lambs that were cast with split ears were offered ; and it is believed, (until late times,) in Caernarvonshire.”

3 Padric, the son of Alvryd ap Goronwy ad Gwdion ap Don, from Gwaredawg, in Arvon, lived about the latter part of the seventh century.

4 Peulan, the son of Pawl Hen, or Paul the Aged, of the Isle of Man, lived in the beginning of the sixth century.

5 Maelog, son of Caw, of Britain, lived in the middle of the sixth century.

6 Tegvan, the son of Carcludwys ap Cyngu ap Ysbwys ap Cadrawd Calchvynydd, lived in the middle of the seventh century.

7 Beaumaris is supposed to have been Porth Wygyr, mentioned in the Triads as one of the principal ports of Britain.

8 Pabo, styled the Pillar of Britain, was son of Arthwys ap Mor ap

Cenau ap Coel, and lived about the beginning of the sixth century; he was buried in Llanbabo.

9 Tyvrydog, the son of Arwystl Glof, or Arwystl the Lame, ap Seithenyn, lived in the latter part of the sixth century; his mother, Tysvanwedd, was daughter of Amlawd Wledig.

10 Dyvnan, the son of Brychan, lived about the middle of the fifth century, and lies buried in Llanddyvnan.

11 Elian Geimiad ap Gallgu Redegawg ap Carcludwys ap Cyngu ap Ysbwys ap Cadrawd Calchvynydd, lived about the close

of the fifth century; his mother was Tegvan, daughter of Tewdwr Mawr.

12 Peirio, one of the sons of Caw, of Britain, and lord of Cwm Cawlwyd, lived about the commencement of the sixth century.

13 Eigrad, the son of Caw y Coed aur, lived in the middle of the sixth century.

14 Gallgov, son of Caw of Britain, lived about the middle of the sixth century.

15 Cadwaladr, styled the Blessed, was the son of Cadwallon ap Cadvan ap lago ap Beli ap Rhun ap Maelgwn; he was the last king of the Britains, and is said to have founded Cadwaladr church, in 686, when he abdicated the throne, and went to Rome, where he died in 703; this church was called Eglwysael, or Church on the brow, before it was dedicated to Cadwaladr.

16 Meirion, the son of Owain Danwyn ap Einiawn Urth ap Cynedda, lived in the close of the fifth century.

17 Ceinwen, daughter of Brychan, lived about the middle of the fifth century.

18 Cafo, the son of Caw, of Britain, lived about the middle of the sixth century. At Fynon Gafo, a celebrated well in the parish, young cocks were used to be offered to the saint, to prevent children from crying.

19 Nidan, the son of Gwrvyw ap Pasgen ap Cynvarch ap Meirchion ap Grwst ap Cenau ap Coel Godebog, lived in the beginning of the seventh century.

20 Edwen was either a niece or daughter of Edwin of Northumberland; she was educated under Cadvan, at Caersegaint, (Caernarvon,) and lived about the middle of the sixth century.

21 Llanddeiniol Vab, i. e. son of Deiniol ap Dynawd ap Pabo; he lived about the beginning of the sixth century.

2. Penmynydd was the ancient residence of Owain ap Maredydd ap Tudor Vychan, grandfather of Henry VII.

23 Flewyn, the son of Ithel Hael, or Ithel the Generous, lived about the year 480.

24 Maethlu, the son of Caredawg Vreichvras, or the Strongarmed, lived in the middle of the sixth century.

25 Mechell, a daughter of Brychan, lived in the middle of the fifth century.

26 Tysilio, the son of Brochwal Ysgythrawg ap Cyngen ap Cadell Deyrnllug, lived about the middle of the seventh century; his mother, Addun Benasgell, or Addun the Winged-head, was the daughter of Pabo Post Brydain.

97 The ancient name of Newborough was Rhosvair, the church NO. XIII.

being erected on the moor, (which Rhos implies,) and dedicated to Mary. In the time of Edward I. it was made a corporate town, and the privileges were confirmed by Edward III., in whose reign it was first called Newborough. In the reign of Henry VIII. it returned a member to Parliament. According to some of our early bards, there appears to have been a palace of some importance:

“Mae llys yn Rhosvair, mae llyn
Mae eur-gloch, mae Arglwydd Llywelyn,
A gwyr tal yn ei ganlyn,
Mil myrdd, mewn gwyrdd a gwyn.”

In Rhosvair is a palace where hospitality
And opulence prevail, under Lord Llywelyn,
Who is surrounded by thousands of attendants,
Gigantic in stature, and attired in white and green.

Ymddyddaniad rhwng Pumlùmon ac Havren.

Aron Havren, dechreuad yr hon sydd yn agos i ben Pumlumon, ac yn rhedeg oddiyno trwy isel-dir swydd Amwythig yn dra annhrefnus, 'herwydd ei throadau cyfeiriadol; yr amgylchiad hwn a berodd, yn ol y traddodiad ar ryw achlysur, yn awr yn anhysbysol i'r ymrafael canlynol:

Mynydd. Igamogam* b’lér ei di?
Afon. Moel heb wallt beth waeth i ti?
Mynydd. Fe dyf gwallt ar fy mhen i

Cyn uniawnir dy faglau ceimion di.

* I gam o gam, from crook to crook.

ENGLISH WORDS

ADAPTED TO THE BEAUTIFUL WELSH AIR OF SERCH HUDOL;

(THE ALLUREMENT OF Love.)

The Scene is laid in the Neighbourhood of the

Bannau Brecheinog.

1.

FAREWELL, my native glen!
Farewell to the valiant men
Who fought for the land
With the Saxon band,
And quelled it again and again.
Land of my sires! how dear thou art !-
Yet soon must the sad Llewelyn part
From the friend of his choice, and the maid of his heart,
And sail o'er the distant main.
Our harvests droop at home:
And many a Cymro now must roam,
A wanderer, 'mid the perilous foam
And the tempest's fearful roar,
To the far-off world, where the tiger keeps
His deadly watch in the forest deeps,
And the serpent his jaws in the red blood steeps, –
Nor see my birthplace more.

II.

Penyvan! thou mountain king,
Whose peaks their shadows fling,
Like a dark deep veil,
When the summer heats prevail
O'er the Cantref's teeming spring :-
No more thy blaze, at the dawn of day,
Shall warn me to take my upland way,
And watch lest the lambs should fall a prey
To the Hebog's* arrowy wing;
Lanfigan's bell would cheer,
On sabbath morn, my youthful ear:
But now I listen with a tear,
That bell has done with me!
Hark! the weary-hearted train moves on;
Loved cot, farewell,-I must be gone:
Alas! I am a friendless one,-
Then welcome, western sea!

W.V.

* Hawk.

r 2

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